Event Speakers

Taino burn Tabonuco (candlewood) before a ceremony and Anishinaabe burn Giizhik (cedar) for healing. We welcome you into our speakers' space of learning and conversation as we listen in on how Dr. Moore and Dr. Bassett circle the questions and experiences that lead them where they are today in their profession and research. The conversation will offer reflection on how knowledge is shared and exchanged between our two researchers and Native American communities. They will also talk about conducting research using decolonizing practices and more diverse methodologies.

 

JOIN THE VIRTUAL TALK BY CLICKING HERE. 

Or copy and paste the link: https://youtu.be/5VK0jBCht-w. You can also bookmark the event on Youtube. 

 

On NMUV Campus, you can join the talk in the Gichigami (Lake Superior) Lecture Hall.

Download a flyer here. 

 

Erica J. Moore

Erica J. Moore, PhD, is Boriken Taíno and a member of the United Confederation of Taino People.  She has a PhD in Higher Education Leadership, Master’s and Bachelor’s degrees in History. She serves as the Director of the American Indian Student Center at SDSU. Before coming to SDSU, she was at Lower Brule tribal college as the Chief Academic Officer.  She has worked in education for over ten years, teaching history and political courses. Her research focuses upon Native American student success. Additionally, she shares her expertise in culturally responsive practices through workshops in K-12 classrooms, museum networks, and medical facilities.

 

Sharity Bassett

Sharity Bassett, Assistant Professor and Co-Coordinator of American Indian and Indigenous Studies at South Dakota State University, is a scholar of Indigenous methodologies, literary analysis, and transfeminist theories. Her manuscript, under contract with Michigan State Press, examines how Haudenosaunee women lacrosse players shape definitions of tradition, medicine, and sovereignty in contested spaces. Sharity’s present research collaborations are centered around Oceti Sakowin and Anishinaabe quillwork, digital storymapping based on oral histories, and gender and parenthood in the workplace during a global pandemic.