Upcoming Events

Beaumier Coffee House Series

French-Canadian Holiday Concert with the Maple Sugar Folk

December 6, 7 p.m., Peter White Lounge, Don H. Bottum University Center

The Beaumier Coffee House Series continues on December 6 with a special concert of French-Canadian holiday songs featuring the Maple Sugar Folks.  The concert will begin at 7p.m. in the Peter White Lounge of the Don H. Bottum University Center.  Admission is Free (Donations are appreciated).  There will be coffee, tea, lemonade and water available.  In addition to the music and treats, there will be a holiday ornament craft area for families at tables in the back of the lounge. Feel free to bring you whole family to this non-denominational event.

Maple Sugar Folk was formed in 2005 by David Bezotte to celebrate and share the Keweenaw’s French Canadian heritage through music, song and dance. 

They have performed at two Upper Peninsula Folklife Festivals in Marquette and at museums, heritage centers, libraries, schools, and community festivals in the Copper Country. Recent performances include folk music presentations for music classes at Barkell Elementary School in Hancock, summer outdoor concerts at Portage Lake District Library in Houghton, participation in fund raiser concerts for the Omega House hospice in Houghton, and a concert celebrating French-Canadian Heritage Week at the Chassell Heritage Center in Chassell. 

Group members include David Bezotte (Director/Accompanist), Amanda Binoniemi, Bill Francis, Marcia Goodrich, Ralph Horvath, Barbara Lide, Bryan Milde, Beth Murrell, Barry Pegg, Karin Schlenker, and Janet Wieber.  Several of the members grew up in homes where French-Canadian customs were practiced and where French was spoken by parents and other relativees.  Many of their songs are Chansons à Répondre, or response songs, designed for singing along.  They encourage the audience to sing along, dance, clap your hands or tap your feet and experience genuine French-Canadian Joie de Vivre!

 

Great Lakes Graham & the Fiddleman and Jerry Mills

November 1, 7 p.m., Peter White Lounge, Don H. Bottum University Center

The Beaumier Coffee House Series continues on Saturday, November 1 with a performance by two of Marquette’s finest folk artists; the duo Great Lakes Graham & the Fiddle Man and singer-songwriter, Jerry Mills.  The performance will begin at 7p.m. in the Peter White Lounge of the Don H. Bottum University Center.  Admission is free (donations are encouraged).

Great Lakes Graham & the Fiddle Man are a folk bluegrass duo from Marquette, Michigan.  They have been playing all over the states of Michigan and Wisconsin since May of 2014.  Great Lakes Graham and the Fiddle Man have an energetic and fun sound that will get every ones feet taping.  They will be playing a mix of original and traditional songs that everyone can enjoy.

Jerry Mills’ performance will be a rare local appearance that follows shows in London and Manchester, England and precedes one in Ann Arbor.  For 20 years, Jerry has been inspiring audiences from Monaco to Sydney, Liverpool to Singapore and all across the US.  Composing hundreds of songs during his 30 year songwriting career, his performances sparkle with a mixture of compelling lyrics, music, humor and insight. “This is a rare opportunity for people to experience some of my most timely songs right here in Marquette, so I personally invite each of you to this show”, Jerry stated. “I write most of my songs in and around Marquette and plan to debut several new gems from the Presque Isle collection,” Mills added. He has recorded a number of CDs including Urgent Reply, The Real You and his latest release, Lifeline. His song, “Come Join Us” was recorded at one of Nashville’s major studios along with more than fifty of Nashville’s finest artists and a music video of that production has been distributed worldwide.

 

Presentation, "English Music on the American Frontier"

October 28, 7 p.m., Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center

The Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center and the Department of History at Northern Michigan University are sponsoring the presentation, “English Music on the American Frontier,” by Dr. William Van Vugt, professor of History at Calvin College.  The lecture will take place on Tuesday, October 28 at 7 p.m. in the Beaumier Center located at 105 Cohodas Hall.  Admission is Free.  This lecture is in conjunction with the Beaumier Center’s exhibition, “Music in the Pines: the history of the Hiawatha Traditional Music Festival,” which is on display through January 31, 2015.

Between 1700 and the American Revolution, many thousands of English people left for America. Some of them came to the region of the Appalachian Frontier. They took along their music and planted it in America, where it evolved to fit the American environment. This music eventually became part of the foundation for early American country music, especially Bluegrass music, also called "Appalachian music," "Old Time Music," or "Roots Music." This session presents a selection of these songs and melodies—demonstrated on the guitar with some vocals—and shows how English music became assimilated to the American frontier, like the immigrants who brought it there.

William Van Vugt is Professor of History at Calvin College, Grand Rapids, Michigan, where he teaches courses in English and American history.  He earned his doctorate at the London School of Economics and Political Science.  His books include Britain to America: the mid-Nineteenth Century Immigrants to the United States (1999); British Buckeyes: the English, Scots, and Welsh in Ohio, 1700-1900 (2006); and British Immigration to the United States, 1776-1914 (2009). He has long had an interest in British music in America, and has performed that music with various ensembles in Britain and America.

 

Beaumier Coffee House Series - Arto and Anti Järvelä

October 11, Reynolds Recital Hall - 7 p.m.

On October 10 and 11, legendary Finnish folk musicians, Arto and Anti Järvelä, will be performing two concerts in Marquette County.  The first concert on October 11, will take place in the Fellowship Hall of Bethel Lutheran Church in Ishpeming at the corner of Third and Ridge Streets.  This concert is sponsored by the UP Chapter of the League of Finnish-American Societies, Finlandia Foundation Chapter.  The second concert will take place on October 11 at Reynolds Recital Hall on the campus of Northern Michigan University, as part of the Beaumier Coffee House Series sponsored by the Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center.  Both concerts will begin at 7p.m. and have free admission (donations will be accepted).

Cousins Arto and Antti Järvelä are members of the famous Järvelä music family of Kaustinen, Finland. With centuries of family tradition behind them, they are touring the US in Fall 2014 playing music from their first album together, “Os fera liluli.” Järvelä fiddlers have been fiddling in the front line of weddings in Ostrobothnia (on the eastern shore of the Gulf of Bothnia, the northernmost arm of the Baltic Sea) for generations, as far back as Juho Järvelä (1794-1837). A long heritage also comes from grandma Martta's (born Kentala) side. The first non-Järvelä fiddler we know of was Juho Wirkkala, who had to pay a fine of five Finnish marks for the crime of playing fiddle in a dance one Sunday evening in 1726.

Growing up in a musical family means growing up with a respect for traditions and history. Arto's and Antti's roots are naturally in Ostrobothnian dance music and ceremonial tunes. With the influence of international traveling and late-night music sessions, both cousins are composers of original music, continuing and expanding the tradition while staying firmly rooted in it. For many years, Arto and Antti have been making music together and separately with different groups, most notably JPP and Frigg. The duo has toured in Canada, Denmark, Norway and United States. They are also experienced teachers of their music and traditions, and so there are a number of possibilities at each tour date for educational workshops. Arto plays with JPP, Nordik Tree, Kaivama, Maria Kalaniemi, Erik Hokkanen & Lumisudet and performs solo. Antti is known for his work with Frigg, JPP, Baltic Crossing, Troka and Kings of Polka.

 

Past Events

French Canadian Heritage Days - October 3 & 4, 2014

On August 28, 2014, Michigan House of Representatives adopted a resolution declaring September 29-October 5, 2014, as French-Canadian Heritage Week in the state of Michigan.  To commemorate this honor, communities around the State will be holding events celebrating the contributions and culture of French Canadians, including the city of Marquette.  These events will take place on October 3 and 4, and are sponsored by the Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center at NMU,  Marquette Regional History Center, Peter White Public Library and the City of Marquette Arts and Culture Division.

The celebration begins on Friday, October 3 with the showing of the film, “The Rocket: The Legend of Rocket Richard,” in the Community Room of the Peter White Public Library.  The showing of this film is part of CineArts Films, sponsored by the Friends & Carroll Paul Memorial Trust Fund of the Peter White Public Library.  Admission is free.  This film tells the story of Quebec’s most famous hockey player, Maurice “The Rocket” Richard, focusing on the struggles of the French Canadian in the National Hockey League dominated by Anglophones.  Richard exceeded the expectations of what an individual was capable of offensively in hockey, the first to score 50 goals in 50 games.  He also became a symbol of French Canadian independence in Quebec and Canada throughout his lifetime. 

On October 4, there will be several events taking place at the Marquette Regional History Center from 11a.m. through 2p.m.   Admission will be $5 for adults and $2 for children.  Throughout the day, there will be an interactive voyageur program in the History Center’s museum gallery, featuring hands on activities and presentations by the Museum’s voyageur interpreters.  In the History Center lobby, there will be presentations of the logging culture of Michigan by interpreter Rob Burg at 11a.m. and 1p.m.  Burg is the former museum manager of the Logging Museum at Hartwick Pines State Park and conducts interpretive programs on the history of logging throughout the State of Michigan.  There will also be a Genealogy Open House in the J.M. Longyear Research Library upstairs at the History Center.  Lastly, there will be a French Canadian Walking Tour of Marquette starting at 1p.m.  This walking tour will show some of the significant historic sites, buildings and homes related to the French Canadian citizens of Marquette.  The tour will be led by members of the French Canadian Heritage Group of Marquette.

Beaumier Coffee House Series - September 6, 7-9 p.m., Wahtera Pavilion

The Beaumier Coffee House Series begins its third season with a performance by two amazing acoustic groups from Marquette featuring original songs and great grooves on Saturday, September 6 at 7p.m.   The evening will begin with a performance by the duo of Kerry Yost and Dylan Trost.  They will be followed by the acoustic swing band, Nick Adams & the Aral Sea Divers.   The performances will take place in the Wahtera Pavilion on the campus of Northern Michigan University, which is located next to Lee Hall.  Admission is free but donations are encouraged.  In the case of bad weather, the performance will be moved to the Peter White Lounge of the Don H. Bottum University Center.

Kerry Yost and Dylan Trost (MALAMUTE) are musicians from the Marquette area and are lovers of old-timey music, blues, and rock n' roll. These influences can be heard in their experimental instrumentals and eccentric, folky songwriting.

Nick Adams and the Aral Sea Divers was formed over the winter of 2014 when Aaron O'Brien, guitarist and vocals, discovered clarinetist Audra Hagan. They immediately bonded over their love for 1930s big band jazz and soon enough found bass player Dan Zini, drummer Phil Kessel, and Trombonist Roscoe Schieler. The group began making surprise appearances at the Blackrocks and Ore Dock breweries, eventually sharing the stage once with Violinist Matt Mitchell, whom they never let go of. Over the summer they recruited Lucas Lafave on upright bass, and since then the group has gone full swing, (no pun intended) playing various events such as wedding receptions, retirement homes, fundraisers, The Marquette Farmers Market, and frequently appearing at local bars. The appeal of the Sea Divers comes from their ability to play timeless and sentimental music in a refreshing and upbeat way. When you hear an old standard your father used to sing, or if a certain note strikes you and sends a shiver down your spine, or if perhaps your feet start moving and you're not too sure why, it may be that Nick Adams and the Aral Sea Divers are around the corner.

Exhibit Opening: "What's On Tap?: Brewing in the Upper Peninsula." - April 19, 1 - 3 p.m.

Join us to celebrate the opening of the Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center’s latest exhibit, “What’s On Tap?: Brewing in the Upper Peninsula,” from 1 – 3p.m. on Saturday, April 19. As part of the opening event on April 19th, there will be free samples of the Ore Dock Brewery’s Bum’s Beach Wheat, food and live music from the local folk group, Kreb’s Cycle.

This student created exhibition is the result of over 4 months work by Beaumier Center assistants Courtney Herber, Gabby Hoffman and Adam Papin. On display from April 19th through September 6th, this exhibit will take visitors on a walk-through of brewing in the UP, starting in the 1850’s and exploring the legacy that has led up to today’s modern breweries.  Brewing, and drinking, beer has been a part of the social experience of living and working in the UP since the days of mining and beyond.  From the saloons of yesterday to today’s modern brewpubs and hobby brewing, we explore the lives of the people involved in creating a driving force of social life in the UP: beer.   On display will be photos, historic breweriana, and modern brewers telling their stories in their own words.  

Admission to the event is free but donations are always appreciated.

 

Beaumier Coffee House Series

Bryan Drewyor and Raymond Little

April 5, 7p.m.

The Beaumier Coffee House Series will feature two singer-songwriters from Marquette County April 5, when Bryan Drewyor and Raymond Little take the stage.  The concert will begin at 7p.m. and will take place in the Peter White Lounge of the Don H. Bottum University Center.  Cookies and beverages will be available.  Admission is Free (donations encouraged). 

Bryan Drewyor takes in life, celebrates it, processes it, and tosses it back at us in one big, soul thumping, feet moving, mindful emotion. This predominantly self-taught performer grew up in the Midwest surrounded by a family full of musicians and artists. From childhood Bryan was heavily influenced by bluegrass, jazz, rock and folk; he inevitably connected with the piano at an early age and acoustic guitar soon after. Bryan encompasses countless different styles, into his song writing. His main focal point is on the energy and emotion of the words, and how they mingle with the melody that carries the song to a whole new intensity. A mixture of folk, rock, soul, pop, ragtime, blues, and classical, this artist does not hesitate to explore the worlds that raised him. The lyrics that fill his songs with life, are deeply rooted in relationships, and experiences, that come from living, growing, and realizing life’s greater gifts. Bryan shares his understanding of the world, and leaves us with a message well played and received.

Raymond Little is a 25 year old singer songwriter who currently resides in Big Bay, Michigan. Little has put out two full length LP's "Brighter shade of blue" (2011) and "Dice Cup" 2013. He currently performs in two local groups, Lost Dog (acoustically based) and Lost Dog & The Big Hustle (electric). Lost Dog (acoustic) recently finished a six song EP titled "Monster in the sea". Lost Dog members will accompany Little at the Beaumier Coffee House Series on April 5th.

 

Special Programs at the Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center to Highlight Folklorist Alan Lomax’s Michigan Legacy

In 1938, a young folk music collector named Alan Lomax—destined to become one of the legendary folklorists of the 20th century—came from Washington, DC to record Michigan’s richly varied folk music traditions for the Archive of American Folk-Song at the Library of Congress. Michigan in the 1930s was experiencing a golden age of folksong collecting, as local folklorists mined the trove of ballads remembered by aging lumbermen and Great Lakes schoonermen. In addition to the ballads of these north woods singers, Lomax recorded a vibrant mix of ethnic music from Detroit to the western Upper Peninsula. A series of commemorative activities will mark the 75th anniversary of Alan Lomax's historic documentation of music and folklore in Michigan-- and its lasting impact on our lives today. This includes innovative publications, public programming, performances, a traveling exhibition, community engagement, digital educational resources, and the return of copies of collections to their home communities.  

The Michigan State University Museum is coordinating two special programs that will travel to the Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center at Northern Michigan University in February 2014. The multimedia performance event Folksongs from Michigan-i-o, February 22, combines live performance with Lomax’s 1938 color movie footage and recorded sound.  Some of these materials haven’t been heard or seen by the general public for more than seven decades. The Lumber Jakki, a trio comprised of Les Ross Sr., Randy Seppala and Oren Tikkanen, will be special guests for the evening. The group performs Finnish songs learned by Ross when he was a young man spending time with lumberjacks around his hometown of Eben.  The event will be held in Jamrich Hall 103 on the campus of NMU and will begin at 7:30p.m.  Admission is free to the public (donations are encouraged).

The traveling exhibition Michigan Folksong Legacy: Grand Discoveries from the Great Depression (on view February 3-March 31) brings Alan Lomax’s 1938 field trip to life through words, song lyrics, photographs, and sound recordings. The exhibit explores this ground-breaking collection of Michigan folk music and what it reveals about Michigan history and culture. Ten interpretive banners explore themes such as Alan Lomax and Michigan folksong collecting in the 1930s; the geography of Lomax’s travels; the musical culture of lumberjacks, miners, and schoonermen (Great Lakes sailors); Michigan’s ethnic diversity and its reflection in Lomax’s field recordings; and the importance of the Lomax Michigan legacy today. Each panel contains a QR code that links to related sound recordings from the Alan Lomax Collection at the American Folklife Center, Library of Congress.

These programs are made possible in part by a grant from Michigan Humanities Council, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities; with additional support from the Michigan State University Museum and its the Great Lakes Traditions Endowment; the American Folklife Center of the Library of Congress; the Center for the Study of Upper Midwestern Cultures at the University of Wisconsin; the Association for Cultural Equity; and the Finlandia Foundation.  The Beaumier Center has also received additional funding from a Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs minigrant administered by the Central Upper Peninsula Planning and Development Commission and the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

For a full list of Cabin Fever Days events, click on this link.

The Life of John Muir

Thursday, January 16 at the Beaumier Center

The Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center is proud to announce a special event to close the Center’s exhibition “U.P. Mosaic: A working landscape for its people.” On Thursday, January 16 at 7p.m., naturalist John Muir comes back to life to tell his story in this one-man performance by Steve Waller. From his early life in Scotland, to growing up in the Midwest and then to the Sierras. John details the amazing life-changing experiences and adventures that changed a self-taught Wisconsin farm boy into a world famous and influential activist, preservationist, explorer, writer and co-founder of the Sierra Club. Few have a more fascinating, entertaining and important life story to tell than John Muir. Hearing him tell his own story is educational, entertaining and inspirational.

Steve Waller is a Marquette area resident who lives in a solar and wind-powered home north of Marquette in the foothills of the Huron Mountains. He was formerly a wilderness guide and co-director of Canadian Wilderness Voyage program, a wilderness canoe adventure program in the Quetico Provincial Park in Ontario Canada.

This event will take place at the Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center, which is located in 105 Cohodas Hall at 1401 Presque Isle Ave. in Marquette. Admission is free to the public (Donations are encouraged).

 

"1812" Exhibition Opening

The War of 1812 was a dramatic event in Canadian history. But what was at stake, and who won? The Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center is proud to bring a traveling exhibition produced by the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa to Marquette that explores the War of 1812 through the perspectives of the four central participants: Canadians (including Canadian First Peoples), Americans, the British, and Native Americans.

To celebrate the opening of this exhibition, the Beaumier Center will be hosting a reception on Thursday, January 23 at 6p.m. in the Center’s gallery.  Non-alcoholic drinks and hors d’oeuvres will be served.  There will be comments from Dennis Moore, Public Affairs Officer, General Consulate – Detroit and also Dr. Russell Magnaghi, Professor of History, Northern Michigan University.

1812, supported by National Presenting Sponsor TD Bank Group and National Supporting Sponsor Ancestry.ca, explores the way in which each participant experienced the war. These multiple perspectives together provide a deeper understanding of the event as a whole.

 

The Great Yooper Folk Dance

January 25, Great Lakes Rooms, Don H. Bottum University Center

The Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center is proud to announce the beginning of the inaugural Cabin Fever Days to be held in Marquette from January 25 through March 22.   This two month long series of cultural events celebrating the culture of the Upper Peninsula will begin with the Great Yooper Folk Dance on January 25 in the Great Lakes Rooms of the Don H. Bottum University Center.  The dance will feature two of the best dance bands in Marquette County.  At 7:30 p.m. there will be a contra dance led by the traditional music group All Strings Considered and with local dance caller Marge Sklar.  This will be followed by a dance at 9 p.m. with the legendary Derrell Syria Project.  Admission to the dance is $5 for adults and $2 for students/kids. 

The Cabin Fever Days is being funded in party by a Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs Arts Minigrant administered through the Central Upper Peninsula Planning and Development Regional Commission.   The idea behind the series of events is to encourage people in the Upper Peninsula to get out and enjoy cultural events in their community during the cold and weather challenging winter months.   For a full list of Cabin Fever Day events, visit the Beaumier Center’s website, www.nmu.edu/beaumier.

All Strings Considered evolved out of the Hiawatha Music Co-op Old-Time Acoustic Jam that began in Marquette in 2007 and continues on the first Saturday of each month. Band members have assorted performance histories with a host of old-time, folk, and bluegrass bands of near and far. All Strings Considered has a primary focus on traditional old-time instrumental and vocal music of the Appalachian region with a bit of Celtic and Scandinavian tossed into the mix from time to time. The group’s sound is a blend of Jamie Kitchel on fiddle, Rochelle Schuster on hammered dulcimer, Phil Watts on guitar, Annette Watts on autoharp, and Maggie Morgan on bass. All Strings Considered will get your feet tapping to those great traditional fiddle tunes then soothe your day with a gentle waltz or tell a story with an Appalachian song.  Marge Sklar has been leading folk dances in Marquette for over a decade and is the owner of the Dance Zone in Marquette.

Derrell Syria needs almost no introduction due to his over 30 year presence on the Marquette music scene.   As one of the co-founders of Conga Se Menne, he has helped define a unique Upper Peninsula sound that has gathered attention far beyond the borders of the U.P.   The Derrell Syria Project is a musical group that features a floating cast of quality musicians that varies in size depending on the performance venue.  They travel throughout the Great Lakes states, entertaining audiences with their unique style of original music along with a large variety of re-arranged cover tunes, mixing their performances with guitars, bass, percussion, congas, keyboards and vocals, playing everything from Finnish dance music, Reggae, Latin, Contemporary and Alternative music. The bands energetic music has pleased audiences, both young and old, at concerts, festivals and many other events and you can be sure that once they start playing, you'll be moving to the rhythm.

Yuletide Celebration, December 19

The Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center at Northern Michigan University will celebrate the end of the year with a traditional Yuletide Celebration from 6-8 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 19.  This non-denominational event will feature activities reflecting cultural traditions for the holiday season and a presentation on the roots of many of these events. It will be held at the Beaumier Center in 105 Cohodas Hall, located at 1401 Presque Isle Ave. in Marquette.  Admission is free to the public (donations are encouraged).

The end of the calendar year, sometimes referred to as the Winter Solstice, has been a time of celebration and reflection for people around the world for centuries. From the very earliest ancient cultures, through the celebration of Hanukkah, to the designation of Dec. 25 as the birthdate of Christ, the “darkest time of the year” has been a period in which many cultures celebrate their most sacred holidays and feasts.  

The Yuletide Celebration at the Beaumier Center focuses on the ethnic and religious traditions found in the U.P. and beyond during the end of the calendar year. Yule tide (“time”) is an ancient Germanic celebration that existed before the spread of Christianity.  Many of the ancient traditions of the season were later absorbed into the Christmas celebrations, including the use of decorated trees and the singing of seasonal songs known as “wassailing.”

Activities that will take place include:

  • Traditional seasonal dances from Europe led by Marge Sklar

  • Samples of traditional ethnic holiday sweets representing the Upper Peninsula’s cultural groups.

  • Craft area for making holiday tree ornaments, candles and gingerbread men.

  • Presentation, “The Darkest Night of the Year” by Daniel Truckey, director, Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center

  • Gallery tours of the Beaumier Center’s new exhibition, “U.P. Mosaic: a working landscape and its people.”

For more information, please contact the Beaumier Center at 906-227-3212 or by e-mail at heritage@nmu.edu.

 

Beaumier Coffee House Series - January 4, 2014

The Beaumier Coffee House Series will continue into the New Year with performances by two talented singer-songwriters from different parts of the Upper Peninsula.  The evening will begin with a performance by the Ishpeming teenage sensation, Bailey Hubbs, accompanied by her father Rusty and will conclude with a performance by a veteran singer/musician, Dave Cormier, from Wakefield.  The coffee house will begin at 7p.m. on January 4 in the Peter White Lounge of the Don H. Bottom University Center.  Admission is free (donations are encouraged).

Bailey Hubbs is still only in high school but has a strong singing voice and is a burgeoning songwriter in her own right.  A member of the Wednesday Night Music Club, she regularly performs at venues in Ishpeming and benefits throughout the community.  Her father Rusty Hubbs is an accomplished guitarist, singer and songwriter, with three decades of experience performing in blues bands and as a solo artist.

Dave Cormier formed his first band, Westwind, when he was still only a junior high student in Wakefield.  That band would stay together through his high school years and after graduating he headed to Minneapolis to continue his music career.  Along with some other musicians from Wakefield, he formed the heavy metal band, Toy Jester, which was a Stallworth in the hard rock scene of Minnesota, Wisconsin and the U.P. for many years.  He relocated to his home town in the 1990s and has only recently begun to perform again and release his solo recordings.

Beaumier Coffee House - Troy Graham and Amy Lakanen

The Beaumier Coffee House Series for December will feature two Marquette singer-songwriters, Amy Lakanen and Troy Graham.  The concert will take place on Saturday, December 7 at 7 p.m. in the Peter White Lounge of the Don H. Bottum University Center.  Admission is free (donations are encouraged).  Drinks and snacks will be available. 

Amy Lakanen  is an experienced songwriter who has performed with many artists in the community, including in the group Cannonball McKay with Jeff Krebs.  She is also a member of the Dead River Derby. Troy Graham has been an active performer and songwriter in Marquette for over a decade.  In addition to his solo performances, Troy is a member of the groups Sparrow Tree and Shadow Arcade.  He has performed at almost every venue in the region and also at the Hiawatha Traditional Music Festival. 

 

French-Canadian Heritage Days Celebration

October 3-4

On June 22, 2013, the State of Michigan designated October 4 as the official French Canadian Heritage Day for the Great Lake State.  This day will celebrate the contributions of French Canadians to the State of Michigan and the impact of their cultural heritage on that of the entire state.  The Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center and the City of Marquette are collaborating on a series of events over two days to help commemorate both French Canadian culture and family history. 

At 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 3, the Beaumier Center will present a concert by the Quebecois folk group Mil at NMU’s Reynolds Recital Hall.  The concert is free to the public. 

On Friday, Oct. 4, the group Mil will be conducting workshops at some Marquette schools.  That evening, the City of Marquette and the Beaumier Center and will host a French Canadian family history event and folk dance. The family history event will begin at 6 p.m. in the Marquette Arts and Culture Center (MACC), located in the lower level of the Peter White Public Library. The event is open to the entire public, but people of French Canadian heritage are encouraged to bring family photo albums and genealogical information to share with others at the event. There will also be French Canadian food items to enjoy. At 7:30 p.m., the folk dance will begin with music provided by Mil with caller Dan Gorno.  The event is free to the public, but a suggested donation of $5 for adults and $1 for students is appreciated.

Mil’s line-up consists of Claude Méthé (fiddle, vocals, tenor guitar, mandolin), Dana Whittle (guitar, vocals, accordion, harmonica, foot percussion), Denise Levac (flute, whistle, vocals). Mostly-original and occasionally-recycled traditional songs and music from Québec featuring Claude Méthé, one of the province’s most-respected fiddlers and singers, flutist/whistle-player, Denise Levac, and “Amériquoise” Dana Whittle on vocals and accompaniment. Crunchy vocal texture, edible harmonies, spicy arrangements, highly danceable compositions, hefty rhythm and tasty playing with true Québécois style and a lovely dash of modernity.

Mil is a fraction of a unit of measure, a tiny seed growing in the rich soil of Québec and North American folk traditions. An offshoot of trad-folk group Dentdelion, this “parenté” has already produced a bountiful musical harvest with the help of their progeny (Béatrix Méthé and Colin Savoie-Levac, whom they continue to perform with), but with the birds frequently away from the nest at school or off with their own bands, the older generation has decided to sprout on their own (does this make Mil “genetically modified”?). The name is also a clear reference to the sheer quantity of music these three are capable of generating – Claude alone composes at least a tune per week! Dana, a song-factory herself, and Denise, a gifted composer in her own right, struggle to keep up with his output. Mil dishes up a melodic treat, with a unique flavour, proudly made in Québec from domestic and imported ingredients.

 

October 5, 2013

Beaumier Coffee House Series with Jenn Copeman and Angela Josephine

The Beaumier Coffee House Series will continue with its second show of the 2013-14 season on Saturday, October 5 with performances by two talented singer-songwriters, Jenn Copeman and Angela Josephine.   The performance will take place in the Peter White Lounge of the Don H. Bottum University Center at 7 p.m.  Admission is free but donations are suggested.  Coffee, lemonade and snacks will be provided.

Jenn Copeman delivers a distinctive show featuring a diverse collection of original music spiced with select covers. Jenn has been playing guitar since she was 12 years old and played shows all over the United States-including a spotlight on the stage of the Grand Ole Opry and in the The Colgate Country Showdown. She hails from Marquette Michigan, and has just recently moved back here from Austin Texas where she was furthering her music career. When she is not touring solo, she joins forces with a variety of musicians, custom tailoring her brainchild, The Copeman Band. Jenn has released her first full length CD titled "Pursuit". This show is bound to be a pleasure for the entire family.

Angela Josephine grew up in Munising and describes herself as a singer, songwriter and seeker of the sacred in the simple stuff.  Since becoming a solo performer, Angela has graced the stage of countless festivals and venues, while coffee houses across the Midwest have warmed to the soulful brew of her music.  In 2006 Josephine’s album “Grace Exhaled” was a finalist in the Detroit Music Awards and in 2007 she was an Artist Ovation Contest Winner for Unity Festival in Muskegon, MI and her song “Spirit of Motherhood” received an honorable mention in the Great Lakes Songwriting Competition. In 2011 she again was a finalist for the Detroit Music Awards in the category of Best Instrumentalist for hammered dulcimer. She has also participated in ArtPrize, performing for “Jukebox” (2011) and “The Looking Box” (2012) by artists Royce Deans (Traverse City) and Tali Farchi (Amsterdam) who interpret music with paint.  Angela often incorporates her original paintings in performances along with facilitating community canvases at various events. 

 

Saturday, April 20th

“Lost and Found: Historic Structures of the U.P.”

On Saturday, April 20, the Beaumier Center will be opening an important and dynamic exhibition on the importance of historic preservation in our communities.  “Lost and Found: Historic Structures of the U.P.” will feature buildings from throughout the region that have either been lost or that have been restored for continued use.  There will be a reception at 1p.m. on April 20 with drinks and snacks.  The exhibition will be on display in the Beaumier Center’s gallery through September 2013. Admission is free to the public. The Center’s hours are Monday through Saturday, 10a.m. to 4p.m.

More and more, communities throughout the United States are recognizing the importance of historic preservation.  Every town has lost structures due to fires, neglect or urban renewal.  Where not all historic buildings can be saved, communities that have created historic districts and have preserved important historic structures have saved more than just the past but also a sense of place and commercial viability. 

This exhibition will delve into these ideas looking at important structures from throughout the U.P. that have been lost and in the process how that affected the community.  In addition, the exhibit will feature historic preservation success stories where buildings that once were considered “eyesores” or even dangerous were restored and have become centerpieces of the community. 

There will be more than 40 structures featured in this exhibition from throughout the region.  Some lost buildings include Northern Michigan University’s Kaye Hall (see image above), which was razed in the 1970s.  Others include the Wakefield Community Building, the Italian Hall in Calumet and the Alger County Courthouse, which was destroyed by fire in 1978.  Success stories include the Calumet Theatre, Carnegie Library in Ishpeming, Marquette City Hall, Ironwood Memorial Building and many others.

To create this exhibition, the Beaumier Center sent requests to historical societies and museums throughout the U.P., asking for them to nominate buildings to be included in the exhibit.  This resulted in dozens of contenders, though there will unfortunately not be enough space for all of the buildings. 

The exhibition is being curated by the Beaumier Center staff.  Research assistant Erin Comer has been conducting research on the structures and will be assisting with writing the narrative and installing the exhibition.  Museum assistant Adam Papin will be designing the layout and interpretive panels of the exhibition.  All of the museum’s staff will be involved in the installation of the exhibition.

Friday, April 26th

​"The U.P. In Story"

The Upper Peninsula has long been a place of fascination for authors, songwriters and storytellers.   From Henry Schoolcraft to Ernest Hemingway to Jim Harrison, the landscape and people of the U.P. have been provided a seemingly endless source of written material.  It is these words that will be front in center in a unique public event being sponsored by the Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center.  “The U.P. in Story,” will take place on Friday, April 26 at 7:30p.m. at Forest Roberts Theatre.   The event will be dedicated to the written and sung word and will feature a wide variety of individuals including radio personalities, local performers and scholars, reading or performing written works by the famous and not so famous.  The event is free and is being sponsored by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs. 

In addition to the authors aforementioned, there will be works read by Robert Traver (John Voelker), Jane Johnston Schoolcraft, Philip Caputo, Lon Emerick, Jane Piirto and many others.  In addition there will be traditional folks songs and contemporary songs by other U.P. songwriters.  Some of the individuals currently signed on to read and perform are Oren Tikkanen, Nicole Walton, Walt Lindala, April Lindala, Daniel Truckey, Leigh Barry, Steve Waller, Corinne Rockow, Dan Rydholm, Jeff Krebs, Jerry Mills and more are to be announced soon.

As part of this exciting event, the Beaumier Center will also be awarding the 2013 Upper Peninsula Folklife Award to the late storyteller and historian, Fred Rydholm.  In 2009, the Beaumier Center created the Upper Peninsula Folklife Award to honor individuals and organizations that have made a significant contribution to the preservation and promotion of the region’s traditional arts and culture.  This will be the fourth time the award has been given with past recipients including folk musicians Johnny Perona (2009) and Les Ross Sr. (2010) and storyteller/musician Oren Tikkanen (2012).  

Fred Rydholm’s legend as a historian of the Upper Peninsula’s ancient and recent history has grown far and wide.  One of the most highly regarded bearers of the U.P.’s oral traditions, his work as an educator, author and guide in the Huron Mountain wilderness cemented his importance to preserving the traditions of the region.  His service work for the Bay Cliff Health Camp, Yellow Dog Watershed and as the mayor of the City of Marquette, rounded out a life dedicated to community and the land.  In his April 6, 2009 obituary, the Mining Journal wrote, “Known and beloved as a storyteller, mentor and friend to countless numbers of followers and fans both regionally and internationally through his books, travels and speaking tours, Rydholm inspired and influenced the way many think and relate to their personal life story, their cultural identity and their relationship to the Upper Peninsula's wilderness heritage.”

 

Past Events

 

 

​Saturday, March 9

Beaumier Coffee House Series

The Upper Peninsula Folklife Festival continues in March with the Beaumier Coffee House Series on Saturday, March 9.    This evening will feature two very different groups, The Door Cats and Eclettico.  The show will be held in the Peter White Lounge of the Don H. Bottum University Center and begins at 7p.m.  The U.P. Folklife Festival is sponsored in part by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs.

The Door Cats are a folk trio based in Marquette. These three have performed across a variety of venues, their most favored being an acoustic set played fireside, each Sunday evening, at the Historic Landmark Inn's North Star Lounge. Kerry Yost provides a heartfelt collection of originals alongside the group's eclectic array of covers. Marcella Krupski's tight-knit harmonies are softened by the lull of Roo Sinski's cello, and the love these women have for music and for one another shines forth with every song.

Eclettico is a group of local, classically trained, professional musicians who strive to present a vast array of musical styles with a funky fresh string sound. They aim to bring our traditional string instruments into non-traditional settings, while opening the ears of listeners to non-traditional music.  Their musical selection ranges from classical to pop to fiddle music, and everything in between--such as Mozart, Bach, and Beethoven as well as The Beatles, Michael Jackson, Lady Gaga, and many more!  Eclettico is composed of current, future, or recently graduated music students. Locally, they are members of the Marquette Symphony Orchestra, the NMU Symphony Orchestra, various chamber ensembles, and maintain strong connections with the public school string programs in the Upper Peninsula. 

Beaumier Heritage Center Hosts St. Patrick's Day Dance & Potluck

On Sunday, March 17, the Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center is hosting a St. Patrick's Day Dance & Potluck.  The potluck will begin at 5:30 p.m. with dancing from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  This event will take place at the Dance Zone, 1113 Lincoln Ave., Marquette.  Admission is $5 adults, $2 students and kids.  Please park in the Dance Zone or Marquette Senior High School lots.  This event is part of the Upper Peninsula Folklife Festival which is funded in part by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs.

Originally a Catholic feast day to commemorate the passing of the patron saint of Ireland, St. Patrick’s Day has become a worldwide celebration of Irish culture.  The Beaumier Center created its annual celebration in 2011, as a way for families to celebrate the holiday and enjoy the food, music and dance of the Emerald Isle.  People are encouraged to bring a dish to pass (though it doesn’t have to be Irish) and, of course, wear something green. 


Traditional Irish music will be provided by Tim Clancy, Tim DeMarte and Barb Rhyneer.  Marge Sklar will offer dance lessons and instructions on traditional dances.  There will also be readings of poetry and folktales about St. Patrick. For more information, call 906-227-1219.

 

Thursday, March 21

Title IX Roundtable

The Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center will be hosting a roundtable discussion on the impact of Title IX on women’s athletics and education on Thursday, March 21 at 7p.m.  The roundtable discussion will feature several individuals whose  lives and work have been effected by Title IX legislation and includes:  Dr. Rebecca Mead, associate professor of history at NMU; Cindy Paavola, director of NMU’s communications and marketing department; Barb Patrick, retired NMU coach and assistant athletic director and  Jamie Tuma, athletic director for Marquette Senior High School.  The event will be held at the Beaumier Center which is located in 105 Cohodas Hall, 1401 Presque Isle Ave. in Marquette.  This discussion is in conjunction with the Center’s current exhibition, “U.P. Power! High School Sports in Upper Michigan.”

It was on June 23, 1972, that the U.S. Congress passed what would become known as “Title IX,” which was actually part of the Education Amendments of 1972, Public Law No. 92‑318, 86 Stat. 235.  In this document was passed the following statement, “No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance...”   This law would have far reaching ramifications by making it law that women should have all the same educational opportunities as men in federally funded institutions.  One of the biggest changes was that school districts would now have to provide as many athletic opportunities for women as men.   

This roundtable will deal not only with how the law came into being but also the changes that have taken place over the past 41 years.   Dr. Mead will discuss the history of Title IX legislation and the other panelists will discuss how Title IX has effected them personally,  the impact of Title IX on the entire female population at universities or high schools receiving federal fund and the status of compliance with Title IX today at our institutions locally and through the US.

Saturday, March 23 at 1p.m.

Rag Rug Weaving Workshop with Roxanne Eberts

The Upper Peninsula Folklife Festival continues with a rag rug twining workshop on Saturday, March 23 at 1 p.m.  The workshop, led by Roxanne Eberts of Hessell, will take place at the Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center located in 105 Cohodas Hall, 1401 Presque Isle Ave. in Marquette.  The cost for the workshop is $15 for the general public and $5 for NMU students.  The workshop is limited to 10 participants, so reservations are highly recommended.  Reservations can be made by calling 906-227-3212. 

Participants will learn the technique called “twining.”  Using  1” strips of fabric and a frame, Roxanne Eberts will show the class how to create beautiful, strong hot pads, placemats, rugs and more!  In this class, participants will work on a small frame so they can complete the project.  Frames will be provided (and can be purchased after the class), as well as the fabric, although, participants may bring your own fabric (at least 2 yards of 100% cotton.  They can also use old clothing, but it should be washed and ready to cut into strips - i.e., if using an old shirt, the collar, cuffs, buttons, etc. should all be cut off).  Each person will need a sharp pair of scissors.

Roxanne Eberts is the owner of Woolderness, Fiber Arts Studio and Gallery, located in the village of Hessel, in Michigan’s Eastern Upper Peninsula.  She opened the studio in November of 2006.  She teaches classes in spinning, weaving, locker hooking, felting & rag rugs!  She began her fiber arts experience with a spinning lesson in the early 1990’s.   She has taught various classes at the Northern Michigan Lamb & Wool Festival in West Branch, as well as at Spring Fling, a spinning weekend sponsored by her local guild, Country Spinners and Bridge Shuttlers.  She lives in Cedarville with her husband, Rick, and two of five children, Sam & Annie.

Wednesday, February 6, 7 p.m.

Memories of Hedgecock with Craig Remsburg, Tom Peters and more

Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center, 1401 Presque Isle Ave.

Free admission

This program features an informal roundtable discussion amongst local sports writers, athletes, and coaches about the memories of the legendary Hedgcock Fieldhouse on the campus of NMU.  Hedgcock, named after Northern’s former head of physical education, CB Hedgcock, was the site of hundreds of competitions including men’s and women’s basketball, volleyball, tennis, wrestling and even track.   Notably, it was the site of the high school regional basketball tournament, which gave the venue some of its most memorable events.   Join in the discussion and hear some great yarns spun about one of the U.P.’s most revered sports venues.

This program is in conjunction with the Beaumier Center’s current exhibit, “U.P. Power: High School Sports in Upper Michigan.”

 

Saturday, February 9, 1 p.m.          

Snowshoeing history tour of Presque Isle     

Meet at the Pavilion on Presque Isle

Free admission

Lace on your snowshoes and join the Beaumier Center for a truly unique walking tour of Presque Isle in the winter.  Dr. John Anderton, professor of geography, will be giving a history tour of the island, showing participants some of the island’s fascinating geographic features and their connections to human inhabitation of the island from the first aboriginal peoples to the present.   Participants will be required to bring their own snowshoes.  There will be hot chocolate and snacks served at the Pavilion before and after the walking tour.

 

Saturday, February 9, 7 p.m.

Beaumier Coffee House Series

Featuring Sam & Taylor and the Chanteymen

Peter White Lounge, University Center

The Beaumier Coffee House Series continues on February 9, with a performance by two exciting young groups from Marquette.   The evening will begin with a set by local duo, Sam and Taylor, followed by the thouroughly original sounds of the Chanteymen.

Good things happen when you sing like nobody’s listening. Such has been the case for the Marquette duo of Sam Graves (21) and Taylor Martin (19). The two have been playing music together for four years now, but for casual, personal enjoyment, and only recently have they decided to bring their brand of acoustic indie to the spotlight. Sometimes folky, sometimes soulful, and sometimes even hinting at punk inspiration, their style doesn’t always adhere to one influence, and it definitely won’t sound like anything you’ve heard on the radio. “We don’t really listen to a song and say ‘we want to sound like that’”, says Sam.  “We just play and see what we can come up with, try to keep it as natural as possible.”

The Chanteymen is a musical ensemble based out of from Marquette. Their music is the words and chords of Christopher Lander Moore, interpreted through a collection of close friends. The sounds have been described as "folk", "folk-punk", "alt-folk", "nu-folk", "folk?", "pop", and "rock", and compared to artists such as Andrew Bird, Sigur Ros, The Mountain Goats, Leonard Cohen, and The Misfits. To date, they have released an album and an EP, both on Grand Rapids MI's "SELF-SATISFIED" label.

Thursday, February 14, 7:30p.m.

Valentine’s Day Concert with

Canzoniere Grecanico Salentino from Italy

Ishpeming Westwood High School Auditorium

Tickets: $20

Tickets can be purchased at the door or at www.nmu.edu/tickets or by calling 906-227-1032

 

Make it a very special Valentine’s Day by coming to this concert by the southern Italian music and dance ensemble, Canzoniere Grecanico Salentino.  This concert will be held at Ishpeming Westwood High School in the school auditorium.  Your ticket will include an afterglow reception with Italian sweets provided by the Paisano Club of Marquette County. 

Formed by writer Rina Durante in 1975, Canzoniere Grecanico Salentino is regarded as Italy’s leading and longest-standing traditional music ensemble, hailing from the Salento, the heel of the Italian boot, in Puglia. Italy's fascinating dichotomy of tradition and modernity come together in the music of CGS: the seven piece band and dancer are the leading exponents in a new wave of young performers re-inventing Southern Italy's Pizzica musical and dance traditions for today's global audience.

The tens of thousands who often congregate for this Lecce-based band’s concerts in Italy know: Bandleader, fiddler, and drummer Mauro Durante and company can make an audience shimmy with the energy of the ancient ritual of pizzica tarantata, said to cure the taranta spider’s bite with its frenzied trance dances. CGS shows are a life explosion: full of energy, passion, rhythm and mystery, they bring the audience from the past into modernity, and back.

 

Friday, February 22, 6p.m.

Student Euchre Tournament

Great Lakes Rooms, Don H. Bottum University Center

Free admission

Considered by many to be the favorite card game of the Upper Peninsula, Euchre was brought to the region by Canadian, Cornish and German settlers.  Now it is played throughout the U.P. and is the “official” card game of NMU’s residence halls.  This tournament is open to all NMU students on or off campus.  Pairs will be required to register together at the tournament or ahead of time by calling 227-3212.  Cards will be provided by the Beaumier Center for the match, no outside card decks will be allowed.   This event is part of NMU’s annual Winter Fest celebration.  Prizes will be given to the 1st, 2nd and 3rd place pairs. 

 

Sunday, February 24, 1p.m.

The Great Yooper Folk Dance and Café

Great Lakes Rooms, Don H. Bottum University Center

Admission: $2 for adults, Free for students/kids

The Beaumier Center’s will end its month-long event with a folk dance featuring two exciting traditional music acts, a large dance floor and a café where you can buy some of your favorite Yooper treats and drinks. 

The dance will begin with a performance by Kaivama, the Minneapolis duo featuring Ishpeming native Jonathan Rundman.  The duo, which also features fiddler Sara Pajanen, is considered one of the most popular and cutting edge Finnish music groups in the United States.  They have been touring the U.S. for nearly two years and have played for thousands of people, including featured performances at this year’s Finn Fest USA in Tucson, Arizona.

They will be followed by one of the U.P.’s most respected and loved music groups, White Water.  For over two three decades, White Water has performed at concerts, festivals, and dances all year round. White Water is known for its musicianship, four-part harmony vocals, and endearing stage presence. In addition to traditional and contemporary folk music, White Water has a large repertoire of dance music and teaches folk dancing to audience members of all ages.

Upper Peninsula Folklife Festival: Beaumier Coffee House Series (12/15/12)

The Upper Peninsula Folklife, Festival continues in December with the Beaumier Coffee House Series, featuring three amazing performing artists Naomi Noordyk and Michael and Erika Waite. This performance will take place on Sat. December 15th and will begin at 7 p.m.  in the Peter White Lounge of the Don H. Bottum University Center.  Admission is free (donations are encouraged).   The Upper Peninsula Folklife Festival is funded in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs.

16 year old Naomi Noordyk is the lead singer for the local Christian band 41West and a lead singer and acoustic guitarist for the local country band, GRN Twine.  Naomi is also a member of the Wednesday Night Music Club.  She has been practicing music for over 12 years and is ready to perform at the Coffee House Series!

Michael and Erika Waite is a local married couple from Marquette. She studied ballet at Western Michigan University and he studied music at Northern Michigan University. Together they perform songs of love and life through images of nature and the lives of common people.  Michael’s music is thoughtful Americana without any glitz, both brutally and joyously honest. Erica is a dancer and choreographer who interprets Michael’s songs into movement. Their collaborations invite the audience into their intimate creative space in a way that only a married couple can.

The Upper Peninsula Folklife Festival is an eight month long series of cultural events featuring folk artists from throughout the Upper Peninsula and reflecting the traditions of the region.  It is sponsored by the Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center at Northern Michigan University, which is dedicated to celebrating the history and culture of the Upper Peninsula.

Upper Peninsula Folklife Festival: Beaumier Coffee House Series (11/3/12)

 

The Upper Peninsula Folklife Festival continues in October with the Beaumier Coffee House Series, featuring two legendary singer/songwriters from the U.P., the Derrell Syria Project and Bobby Bullett.  This performance will take place on Sat. November 3 and will begin at 7 p.m.  in the Peter White Lounge of the Don H. Bottum University Center.  Admission is free (donations are encouraged).   The Upper Peninsula Folklife Festival is funded in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs.

Darrell Syria needs almost no introduction due to his over 30 year presence on the Marquette music scene.   As one of the co-founders of Conga Se Menne, he has helped define a unique Upper Peninsula sound that has gathered attention far beyond the borders of the U.P.   The Derrell Syria Project is a musical group that features a floating cast of quality musicians that varies in size depending on the performance venue.  They travel throughout the Great Lakes states, entertaining audiences with their unique style of original music along with a large variety of re-arranged cover tunes, mixing their performances with guitars, bass, percussion, congas, keyboards and vocals, playing Reggae, Latin, Contemporary and Alternative music. The bands energetic music has pleased audiences, both young and old, at concerts, festivals and many other events and you can be sure that once they start playing, you'll be moving to the rhythm.

Celebrating over fifty years in the music business as a writer/performer, Bobby Bullet, born Robert St. Germaine in 1942 on the Lac du Flambeau Reservation, continues to draw from a life and career filled with uncertainty, joy, love and difficult decisions to create memorable lyrics and heartfelt music. He considers himself a Country/Folk songwriter; his audiences, however, know him to be much more. He is a cross genre musical performer, humorous, multi-faceted performance artist who reaches across generational lines to gently assault the consciousness about critical issues. His journey is the journey of a generation of Indian men born into tumultuous times seeking identity, fading traditions and language, the way to live with one foot in each cultural world and the strength to forge a new way still grounded in and old world of resourcefulness and honor.

The Upper Peninsula Folklife Festival is an eight month long series of cultural events featuring folk artists from throughout the Upper Peninsula and reflecting the traditions of the region.  It is sponsored by the Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center at Northern Michigan University, which is dedicated to celebrating the history and culture of the Upper Peninsula.

 

U.P. Beaumier Heritage Center: Sports Exhibit (10/20/12-3/30/12)

 

High school athletics are a staple of the life of communities throughout the Upper Peninsula.   They are represent more than just an opportunity for your people to compete but also are a source of pride and even entertainment for the community as a whole.  Over the past 130 years, the Upper Peninsula has had a proud history of athletics in its schools and some of these stories and legends will be on display in the new exhibition, “U.P. Power! High School Sports in Upper Michigan.”  The exhibit will open on October 20 at 1p.m. in the Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center on the campus of Northern Michigan University.  There will be a reception for the exhibit and a number of U.P. sports legends will be on hand at the display.  The exhibition will be on display at the Beaumier Center through March 30, 2013.

The exhibit will feature stories about the greatest teams, players and coaches in Upper Peninsula high school sports history, including photographs, trophies, uniforms and other memorabilia.  There will also be an interactive computer station with statistics for each team sport for boys and girls.   The artifacts for the exhibit will be on loan from high schools, historical societies and individuals from throughout the Upper Peninsula, and will represent the greatest stories in U.P. sports history.

To create the exhibit, the Beaumier Center put together a committee of sports writers, historians and former athletes from throughout the Upper Peninsula.  The task of the committee was to form the basic framework of the exhibit, develop the outline and identify players and teams that would be featured.  Members of the committee include Craig Remsburg from the Mining Journal, Denny Grall from the Daily Press (Escanaba), Rob Roos from the Sault Ste. Marie Evening News, and many at large members including Rod Guizetti, Larry Rubick, Dave Hallgren, Dave Lahtinen, Tom West, Pat Gallinagh, Tom Peters, Barb Patrick, and many others contributors.  The group began meeting in January 2012 to discuss the exhibit.

The exhibition will feature several great teams and sports dynasties in high school sports. An example would be the Chassell boys basketball team which went undefeated from 1956 through 1958, winning three state titles and setting a still unbeaten winning streak record.   The Chassell Historical Society is loaning several historical items related to the team to the Beaumier Center for the exhibit.   The exhibition will be broken up into various sections not by sport but by subjects, such as Dynasties, Greatest Teams, Greatest Performances, and Legendary Games. 

Throughout each section will be featured teams, players and coaches who contributed to these teams or achieved something great either during their career or on one particular day.  An example would be John Payment, the Brimley high school high jumper who broke the all-state, all class high jump record in May 1989 with his jump of 7’ 1” at the U.P. finals in Marquette.  This meet is a legend in U.P. sports history and Payment’s record still stands for all schools in the State of Michigan.  Another athlete, who many sports historians had forgotten, was Christy (Salonen) Provost who from 1993 to 1996 won four straight Giant Slalom state titles (3 all-class, 1 Class B) and one slalom title, the only skier ever to do that in state competition.  

The title for the exhibit comes from a popular chant of U.P. high school teams and their fans when they go to downstate Michigan for state tournaments.   No one is sure when it exactly originated but it became a rallying cry for U.P. teams after the 1975 State Football championships when both Ishpeming and Crystal Falls-Forest Park won titles on the same day.  It is considered a watershed moment for U.P. football because for over 50 years, our teams never got to play the best teams from the Lower Peninsula.  Ishpeming ended Hudson’s record setting winning streak in the Class C final and CFFP trounced Flint Holy Rosary 50-0.  

Friday, October 26th

​Upper Peninsula Folklife Festival Featuring Contra Dance and All Strings Considered 

The Upper Peninsula Folklife Festival continues with a Contra Dance and performance featuring All Strings Considered.  This event will be held on Friday, October 26, at the Dance Zone, 1113 Lincoln, Marquette.  It will begin with contra dance at 7:30p.m. followed by a concert performance by the group at 9:20p.m.   There is a suggested donation of $5 for adults, $2 for students/kids.  The Upper Peninsula Folklife Festival is presented by the Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center and is funded in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

All Strings Considered evolved out of the Hiawatha Music Co-op Old-Time Acoustic Jam that began in Marquette in 2007 and continues on the first Saturday of each month. Band members have assorted performance histories with a host of old-time, folk, and bluegrass bands of near and far. All Strings Considered has a primary focus on traditional old-time instrumental and vocal music of the Appalachian region with a bit of Celtic and Scandinavian tossed into the mix from time to time. The group’s sound is a blend of Jamie Kitchel on fiddle, Rochelle Schuster on hammered dulcimer, Phil Watts on guitar, Annette Watts on autoharp, and Maggie Morgan on bass. All Strings Considered will get your feet tapping to those great traditional fiddle tunes then soothe your day with a gentle waltz or tell a story with an Appalachian song.

 

Upper Peninsula Folklife Festival: Beaumier Coffee House Series (10/6/12)

 

The Upper Peninsula Folklife Festival continues in October with the Beaumier Coffee House Series, featuring two acts specializing in historical songs and stories.   On October 6, the series will feature three songwriters, storytellers and historians including the Escanaba performer, Bill Jamerson, and the Sault Ste. Marie duo, Dave Stanaway and Susan Askwith.   This performance will begin at 7 p.m. at the Peter White Lounge of the Don H. Bottum University Center.  Admission is free (donations are encouraged).   The Upper Peninsula Folklife Festival is funded in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs.

Bill Jamerson knows a good story when he hears one. Since 1992, when he produced his first PBS film, Bill has been collecting stories and turning them into films, books, articles and songs. His school assemblies and “History through Song” programs have been presented in eleven states at diverse venues including college life-long learning groups, libraries, state and national parks, historical societies, nature conservancies, community concerts, senior living communities and cruise lines.  History was a hobby for Bill until the summer of 1991 when he discovered archival films of CCC Boys. He used the films to produce his first PBS documentary, Camp Forgotten – The Civilian Conservation Corps in Michigan. Bill went on to produce 10 more films for Michigan Public Television.

For the better part of a decade, Dave Stanaway and Susan Askwith have been performing together as a duo, focusing on writing and performing historical songs about the Sault Ste. Marie region.  In addition to giving twice-weekly summer concerts at the John Johnston House, they performed at the Historical Society of Michigan's 2005 Upper Peninsula History Conference, held at Lake Superior State University. They have also brought history to life for fourth grade students at various Eastern Upper Peninsula elementary schools, through a grant with the Chippewa County Historical Society.  The duo recorded the CD, “John Johnston:  His Life and Times in the Fur Trade Era,” with songs about the early Sault Ste. Marie settler and fur trader. 

The Upper Peninsula Folklife Festival is an eight month long series of cultural events featuring folk artists from throughout the Upper Peninsula and reflecting the traditions of the region.  It is sponsored by the Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center at Northern Michigan University, which is dedicated to celebrating the history and culture of the Upper Peninsula.

 

Funky Folk Dance at Ore Dock Brewing Company (9/21/12)

 

The Upper Peninsula Folklife Festival continues on Friday, September 21 with the Funky Folk Dance featuring U.P. Gumbo.   The dance will take place at the Ore Dock Brewing Company at 114 Spring Street in Marquette at 8:30p.m.  Admission to the dance is free and limited to individuals age 21 and over.   This event is in conjunction with the Homecoming Week activities of Northern Michigan University and is co-sponsored the Alumni Association.    It is funded in part grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Michigan Council for the Arts and Cultural Affairs.

U.P. Gumbo is a Marquette based folk group specializing in the dance music of the Missisisipi Delta and the New Orleans region.    Their music is infused with the sounds of the Delta Blues, Zydeco and early rock and roll.  Its band members are all long-time legends of the Marquette music scene, including Bill Hart (resophonic guitar and vocals),  Dan Flesher (upright bass and vocals), Warren Hantz (keyboards, dobro and banjo) and Randy “Da Bones Man” Seppala (percussion). 

The Upper Peninsula Folklife Festival is an eight month long series of cultural events featuring folk artists from throughout the Upper Peninsula and reflecting the traditions of the region.  It is sponsored by the Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center at Northern Michigan University, which is dedicated to celebrating the history and culture of the Upper Peninsula.

 

Upper Peninsula Folklife Festival: Quilting Workshop (9/15/12)

 

The Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center, as part of its Upper Peninsula Folklife Festival, will be hosting a beginner’s level quilting workshop on Saturday, September 15 from 1p.m. to 4p.m.  The workshop is limited to 12 participants and reservations are highly encouraged.  The cost for the workshop is $10 for adults and $5 for students and is limited to high school age and up.  To make a reservation please call 906-227-3212.  This workshop is funded in part by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs.

The workshop is being led by Kathy Peters and Judy Parlato, members of the Marquette County Quilters.  Workshop participants will make several small fabric pieces of traditional and liberated designs using no sew fusing techniques.  The workshop will be held in the Beaumier Center which is located in 105 Cohodas Hall, 1401 Presque Isle Ave. in Marquette. 

The Upper Peninsula Folklife Festival is an eight month long series of cultural events featuring folk artists from throughout the Upper Peninsula and reflecting the traditions of the region.  It is sponsored by the Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center at Northern Michigan University, which is dedicated to celebrating the history and culture of the Upper Peninsula.

 

Upper Peninsula Folklife Festival: Beaumier Coffee House Series (9/14/12)

 

The Beaumier U.P. Heritage Center announces the opening of the 2012-2013 Upper Peninsula Folklife Festival on Friday, September 14 with its monthly Beaumier Coffee House Series.   The featured performers will be two local songwriting duos, Team Awesome and Shadow Arcade.  The show will begin at 7p.m. in the Peter White Lounge of the Don H. Bottum University Center.  Admission is free but donations are encouraged.  Refreshments and treats will be available.  This event, as with all UP Folklife Festival events, is funded in part by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs.

Team Awesome is an original alternative rock group based out of cozy Marquette Michigan. They play not only as a dynamic acoustic duo, but also as a garage rock trio with talented drummer Dawson McKenzie. Their music is derived from the sounds around them, and draws influences from all areas--jazz, funk, blues, folk, and rock. Heather Evans, guitarist and singer, began playing viola in grade school, eventually taking up guitar at age thirteen. Soon she was to be introduced to the band The White Stripes by Gretchen McKenzie, who began playing bass at eleven in the school orchestra. Thanks to a shared love of the band, the two soon began jamming, and formed Team Awesome.  The group has been gigging in Marquette regularly since 2010, and is set to release a double acoustic-electric album in the near future. The original songs composed by Evans and McKenzie have become a key element of their sets, along with an eclectic mix of covers by various artists.

Shadow Arcade plays energetic and enjoyable indie pop music about girls, boys, booze, cars, trains, and awkward occurrences… And they do it well.  In April 2012 through the magical combination of raucous basement concerts and breweries in Marquette, Michigan, local musicians Troy Graham and Breanne Kanak met, conversed, and soon began to write catchy, revealing, and sometimes hilarious songs. This melding of the minds would, a mere week later, be known as Shadow Arcade. This band envelops their audience with only a guitar, tambourine, and two dissimilar but refreshingly harmonious vocal styles. Shadow Arcade has been featured at MTU’s Keweenawesomefest, The Orpheum Theater, The Doug Garrison Show, Music on Third, and several other venues in and around the Upper Peninsula. They will be releasing their first full-length album “Were We” in mid-August.