Current Programs and Course Offerings

18010503_10154831959108124_652335567010734213_n.jpg

Here is the NAS course offering list for the winter 2019 semester. Registration at NMU opens November 2. Classes begin January 14, 2019.
The NMU Center for Native American Studies offers the following academic programs.

► the Native American Studies major

► the Native American Studies minor (generalist)

► the (new) Native American Community Services minor

► the (new) Native American Community Services associate degree - offered in cooperation with the NMU Department of Social Work

► a 12-credit undergraduate certification in American Indian Education endorsed by TEDNA (the first and only program to be awarded such an endorsement) and

► core courses in the Masters of Educational Administration: American Indian Education Administration and Supervision endorsed by TEDNA and offered in cooperation with the NMU School of Education, Leadership and Public Service

Print off the CNAS Program Offerings and along with the CNAS course listings (updated F18) look at the two side by side to help build a blueprint of what is possible (best viewed with legal size paper).

Photo above: NAS majors work with Dr. Jud Sojourn on an Anishinaabemowin project. From left to right: Tanya Zorza, Dr. Jud, Jeremy Martin, Grey Shea, and Mitch Bolo.

TEDNA: Tribal Education Departments National Assembly


37560428605_29cfe36859_o.jpg

The CNAS offers several courses online as asynchronous courses (students work independently) or through the online video platform Zoom with pre-arranged meeting times. A very specific Native American Studies minor can be completed online. Learn more about online learning at NMU's Global Campus.

 

The online asynchronous NAS courses include:

NAS 204 Native American Experience

NAS 315 History of Indian Boarding School Education

NAS 330 Native Cultures and the Dynamics of the Religious Experience

 

Online courses that utilize the video platform Zoom include: 

NAS 101 Anishinaabe Language, Culture, and Community I

NAS 404 Research and Engagement in NAS

NAS 485 American Indian Education

NAS 486 American Indian Educational Law and Leadership

 

Photo right: NAS faculty and students take part in a special topics course Native American Professional Development (F17) taught by Dr. Jud Sojourn. The right screen features satellite students away from the NMU Campus: (top left) Dr. Chris Gordon, faculty at JKL Lumsden Bahweting Anishinaabe PSA School, (top right) Denise Cadeau, Native American studies director at Keweenaw Bay Ojibwe Community College, (bottom) Kristi Phillips, faculty at Nah Tah Wahsh PSA. Students on the NMU campus: (bottom) Tom Biron, (left to right), Dr. Jud Sojourn, April Lindala, Dr. Martin Reinhardt, and Leora Lancaster. 


36558220_10156079877458124_2921968231172276224_o.jpg

What also makes NAS courses distinct is the connection to Indigenous ancestral homelands as well as connection to forests, animals, water, and environment. Students concerned about an Indigenous earth ethic may wish to explore these following courses.

NAS 207 a, b, c Seasonal Exploration Anishinaabe Language

NAS 240 Sacred Ground: Native Peoples and Mother Earth

NAS 340 Kinomaage: Earth Shows Us the Way

NAS 342 Indigenous Environmental Movements

NAS 440 Awesiinh: Wild Animal Relations

Photo: Students from NAS 340 Kinomaage course (summer 2018).


Educators already in the classroom and students interested in education would benefit from the following NAS courses (some of which are available for graduate credit)

NAS 212 Michigan Wisconsin Tribal Relations [meets PA 31 requirement in Wisconsin]

NAS 315 History of Indian Boarding School Education

NAS 340 Kinomaage: Earth Shows Us the Way (Kinomaage is the Anishinaabe word for education and teacher)

NAS 484 Native American Inclusion in the Classroom (offered every other summer)

NAS 485 American Indian Education [meets PA 31 requirement in Wisconsin]

NAS 486 American Indian Educational Law and Leadership


12080252_10153353648553124_1931222356805937315_o.jpgStudents interested in political science, pre-law, and social justice would benefit from the following NAS courses.

NAS 212 Michigan Wisconsin Tribal Relations

NAS 288 Politics of Indian Gaming

NAS 310 Tribal Law and Government

NAS 342 Indigenous Environmental Movements

NAS 414 First Nations Women

NAS 424 Indian Activism and Contemporary Cultural Expression

NAS 488 Native American Service Learning Project

Photo: Martin Reinhardt (back to the camera) does a demonstration of the Moccasin Game with NMU students in Jamrich Hall to promote the offering of NAS 288.


41545020591_283140f1e0_b.jpg

Students immersed in the fields of art, literature, media, and cultural studies would enjoy the following NAS courses.

NAS 101 Anishinaabe Language, Culture, and Community I

NAS 224 Native American Beadwork Styles

NAS 280 Storytelling by Native American Women

NAS 320 American Indians: Identity and Media Images

NAS 330 Native Cultures and the Dynamics of the Religious Experience

NAS 422 American Indian Humor

NAS 424 Indian Activism and Contemporary Cultural Expression

Photo: NAS students Caitlyn Wright, Amy Jo Klas, and Julie Rae Perry stand with their bead art during the 2018 Celebration of Student Works (April 12, 2018). Each student in NAS 224 (W18) created a portfolio of work to submit to the CSW for public presentation.


Do you have questions about Native American Studies programs and courses? Make an appointment to meet with April Lindala, director of the Center for Native American Studies, by calling 906-227-1397. April is also available for meetings via Zoom video if you live far from the NMU Campus. Chi miigwech for your interest in Native American Studies programs and courses.

 

students