Candidate Preparation

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION CERTIFICATION PROGRAM APPLICATION

CANDIDATE PREPARATION – Option 1

October 29, 2010

Candidate Perceptions of Teacher Preparation Program

Data on candidate performance is collected, analyzed and disseminated by the Associate Dean of Teacher Education and the Director of Field Experiences. Michigan Department of Education data for Elementary Pedagogy for the 2007 – 08 MDE Teacher Exit Survey demonstrate that 94% of elementary candidates felt prepared to teach mathematics, social studies, science, language arts, reading, writing, and comprehension. 2008 – 09 MDE Teacher Exit Survey results in Elementary Pedagogy show 96% of elementary candidates prepared to teach in those same areas. NMU surveys all teacher candidates, cooperating teachers and university supervisors in these areas as well through the use of survey tool (Final Evaluation of Student Teacher) designed to reflect the Professional Standards for Michigan Teachers. A review of these data for fall 2007 through winter 2010 show that student teachers self report a level of “Proficient” in the areas of “Content Area Knowledge” (94.7%) and “General Knowledge” (93.1%). Cooperating teachers assessed elementary candidates at 98.1% and 95.6% “Proficient” and university supervisors ranking elementary candidates at 94.6% and 93.8% “Proficient” respectively in these two areas.

Candidate perceptions of the program in the area of technology are also reflected in a 95% efficacy score on ELSMT 7 of the 2007 – 2008 MDE Teacher Exit Survey and a score of 97% on the 2008 – 2009 MDE Teacher Exit Survey ELSMT 7.

The Final Evaluation of Student Teacher in the area of technology shows the following candidate perceptions:

Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Winter 2008, Winter 2009, Winter 2010 - Elementary

 Integrate Technology

Student Self Report

P

I

B

NC

B.  INSTRUCTIONAL COMPETENCE5. Lesson planning

 

B.5.5. Uses a variety of methodologies, technologies and techniques.

90.8%

7.6%

0.8%

0.8%

B.  INSTRUCTIONAL COMPETENCE6. Lesson Presentation

 

B.6.4. Uses a variety of methodologies, technologies and techniques.

93.1%

6.1%

0.8%

0.0%

B.  INSTRUCTIONAL COMPETENCE7. Use of materials and resources

 

B.7.2. Selects, creates and incorporates appropriate instructional techniques, technology and materials needed for instruction.

94.7%

5.3%

0.0%

0.0%

B.7.3. Demonstrates current knowledge about instruction, resources and technology.

92.4%

7.6%

0.0%

0.0%

B.7.4. Helps students access and use information technology and other resources to become independent learners and problem solvers.

81.7%

15.3%

0.0%

3.1%

C.  ASSESSMENT COMPETENCE2. Grading and reporting student achievement

 

C.2.3  Uses technology to organize, manage, evaluate and communicate information about student performance.

83.2%

9.2%

0.8%

6.9%

Follow-up conversations with candidates in the lower scoring areas of helping students access technology (81.7%) and using technology to communicate student performance (83.2%) in seminars revealed a lack of available technology in some classrooms used for the student teaching experience.

Candidate performances in the areas noted above (Content/General Knowledge & Technology) are combined with the other overarching categories assessed on the Final Evaluation of Student Teacher. Specifically, our program looks at additional performance indicators in the areas of Liberal Arts, Pedagogy and Diverse Field Experiences, and Becoming Caring and Committed Professionals. These data are used in concert with the MDE Teacher Exit Survey (2007-08; 2008-09) data with faculty and cooperating teachers to make program revisions.

In 2008, faculty were curious about NMU alumni perceptions of their teacher education program. Survey results were combined with previous MDE data and new learning around the following questions:

Combining the alumni survey results with the MDE Teacher Exit Surveys and NMU Final Evaluation of Student Teacher led faculty to recognize that managing students’ behaviors remains a top priority into the induction years and beyond. It has led us to discuss how these skills could be taught separate from the student teaching experience and to question how this is tied to student teacher’s adherence to the style of their cooperating teacher.

Content:

Michigan Test for Teacher Certification

ANNUAL SUMMARY OF STATE RESULTS: INITIAL & CUMULATIVE

Program Year: September 2006 - August 2009

KEY: N = Number of Eligible Test Takers; N Pass (% Pass) = Number (Percent) of Eligible Test Takers Who Passed the Test

NOTE: This table should be viewed with the accompanying descriptive page and interpretive cautions.

Preparation Institution = 21 Northern Michigan University

 

Attempt Type

 

 

Initial

Cumulative 

 

N

N Pass

% Pass

N Pass

% Pass

Test:

 

 

 

 

 

005 Reading

2

2

100

2

100

083 Elementary

177

174

98.3

176

99.4

084 Social Studies

76

58

76.3

67

88.2

089 Mathematics (Elem)

48

46

95.8

47

97.9

090 Language Arts (Elem)

58

52

89.7

53

91.4

093 Integrated Science (Elem)

34

23

67.6

26

76.5

 

The Associate Dean of Teacher Education uses the MTTC data to inform faculty of NMU’s performance and to suggest how these data may be used for program revision. Faculty revise course content based on several indicators of candidate performance of which the MTTC is one.

MDE Performance Score Data

Northern Michigan University scored at the exemplary rank for the past two years with an overall score of 63/70 for the 2008-2009 Academic Year and 68/70 for the 2007-2008 Academic Year. The State Board of Education approved the “Teacher Preparation Performance Score” in June 2006.  This rubric assesses the effectiveness of teacher preparation programs on criteria related to program approval, MTTC scores, program completion rates, program satisfaction, and recruitment of minority teachers and high needs content areas.  NMU is constantly striving to maintain its exemplary rating, realizing efforts to do more to increase candidate racial diversity have had limited effect.

Pedagogy (Based on 2008 Professional Standards for Michigan Teachers)

Elementary Student Teaching (ED 420) and the Student Teaching Seminar (ED 450) are designed around the PSMT as evidenced in the Final Evaluation of Student Teacher. The student teacher, cooperating teacher and university supervisor all complete the same evaluation. The area of Pedagogy and Diverse Field Experiences demonstrates consistency in content and instructional pedagogy with the exception of “Controls classroom behavior” and “Makes smooth transitions” where the student teacher on average ranks themselves about 9% lower than the cooperating teacher and university supervisor.

All student teachers complete an electronic portfolio addressing the PSMT. This portfolio is assessed by practicing administrators, human resource personnel, superintendents, mentor teachers and university faculty at a mock interview conducted at the final elementary education seminar.

Cooperating Teacher/Mentor Perceptions of Teacher Preparation Program

The Final Evaluation of Student Teacher, aligned with the PSMT, is completed by all cooperating teachers. The data from fall 2007 through winter 2010 is organized in the following ways for program review: Candidate Knowledge, Technology, Liberal Arts, Pedagogy and Diverse Field Experiences, and Becoming a Caring and Committed Professional. Performance data indicates candidates perform well in student teaching as evaluated by cooperating teachers and university supervisors.

The MDE collects efficacy scores from NMU University Supervisors.  The efficacy score for the 2008-09 and 2007-08 academic years were at 99%.

The elementary education program holds four meetings each semester for cooperating teachers and university supervisors to reflect on the supervision of student teachers and to review quantitative and qualitative data on candidate and program performance. This is done according to a published Student Teaching Calendar.

Content-Area Faculty Perceptions of Teacher Preparation Program

All changes, additions, and deletions of curricula for undergraduate programs based on program data are routed to the Committee for Undergraduate Programs (CUP), a standing committee of the Academic Senate. Since the 2007-2008 academic year, CUP has been chaired by Dr. Laura Reissner, a member of the School of Education, Leadership and Public Service. Having the chair so easily accessible to our Unit has allowed for a better understanding of the submission process for program changes.

CUP has clearly defined forms for submitting changes to academic programs and all actions are accounted for and published on the Academic Senate website providing full transparency. A check of bulletin copy demonstrates that actions taken through this process have been documented.

Evidence of Impact of Program Graduates on K-12 Learning

The NMU School of Education, Leadership and Public Service administered a Principal Survey in 2007-08 and 2008-09. Principals in the 07-08 survey reported positively on new teachers and their use of technology in the classroom to teach and to manage classroom. Faculty inquired about technology use specific to content area teaching and the gap between technology available at the university and what is available in the public schools. The 08-09 principal feedback in the category “Shows evidence of enabling students to meet content standards (GLCEs/HSCEs)” resulted in 34/37 respondents replying “Always” or “Usually”. These data are consistent with student teaching evaluations forms documenting high proficiency for our teacher candidates in this area.

Candidates are assessed in their ability to implement and assess the curriculum on the Final Evaluation of Student Teacher. An assessment completed by the candidate, cooperating teacher and university supervisor evaluate the candidate’s ability to implement content and instructional pedagogy as well as their ability to do this in a caring and professional manner.

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