Fragments

Fragments are incomplete sentences.  Some fragments are obviously related to the sentences before or after them.  Therefore, a fragment is often next to the sentence it should join, and one of the easiest ways to correct a fragment is to connect it to a nearby whole sentence.

For example:
Northern offers many majors in English.  Such as writing, education, and graduate bound.
Revision:
Northern offers many majors in English, such as writing, education, and graduate bound.

For example:
I need to find a new friend.  Because the one I have now is mean.
Revision:
I need to find a new friend because the one I have now is mean.
OR
I need to find a new friend.  The one I have now is mean.

Some fragments are not clearly parts of sentences.  These often lack a subject or a verb.  Both a subject and a verb are necessary to make up a complete sentence.

For example:
A story with deep thought and emotion.  (no main verb)
Revision:
She told a story with deep thought and emotion. OR A story with deep thought and emotion would be best right now.

For example:
Walking softly through the night.  (no subject)
Revision:
She went on walking softly through the night. OR She walked softly through the night.

To spot fragments: Watch for sentences that lack either a subject or a verb.

Compiled and edited from Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL).