Diversity Edge Opportunities

Diversity Edge Opportunities


For the Diversity Edge, you will need a 100 hours that must include a combination of international and domestic diversity (a minimum of at least 20 hours in each area).

Movies only count if there is a formal discussion afterwards.

You can log 30 hours for language classes, including sign language.

 

Possible Citizenship or Diversity (International) Edge Hours

Interested in volunteering or studying abroad?  Check out what projects are being offered now.
 

Possible Diversity Edge Hours - Domestic

Tony-Award winner George C. Wolfe’s groundbreaking play, The Colored Museum, has electrified, shocked, and delighted audiences of all colors. “A black comedy” broken up into 11 “exhibits” or sketches, The Colored Museum takes a satirical look at prominent themes and identities of African American culture and what it means to be black in contemporary America. Check it out on Saturday, February 6, at 7:30 p.m. in the Whitman Commons.

Possible Diversity Edge Hours - International

On Tuesday, February 9, from 9-10:30 a.m. in JXJ 2319, join Bing Goei, State of Michigan Office for New Americans (MONA), as he discusses, "Migration to Michigan:  Challenges and Opportunities."  Mr. Goei, the former owner of Eastern Floral who now leads Michigan’s Office for New Americans, discusses how Michigan receives the third largest share of refugees coming to the U.S. and the State of Michigan’s efforts to integrate newcomers into the state. As more immigrants arrive, what are the implications?  
 
In partnership with the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan, NMU’s Political Science Department and International Programs office are hosting the 2016 Great Decisions Global Discussion Series in Marquette.  Great Decisions is a series of critical examinations of the most important foreign policy issues of the day (as determined by the Foreign Policy Association) presented by a roster of experts with world-renown in their fields. 

Each event will begin with the screening of a 30-minute video produced by the Foreign Policy Association, which will set the context for the foreign policy topic examined that week.  Following the video, participants will watch a webinar by the featured presenter.  Often, the webinars will be live and interactive.  Presenters webcast from Grand Rapids to other World Affairs Council of Western Michigan partners.  Following the webinar, there will be time for discussion with the local participants.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact Kevin Timlin at (906) 227-2510.

Possible Diversity Edge Hours - Domestic

On Wednesday, February 10, at 7 p.m., location TBD, Dr. Bakari Kitwana, Black History Month Speaker, will give "A Frank Discussion about Straight Outta Compton, Hip Hop culture, and today's youth."

Possible Diversity Edge Hours - Domestic

Want to learn more about ALLIES, a campus organization for people of all sexual orientations?  If so, we have meetings on Fridays (February 12, March 11, and April 8) from Noon-1 p.m. in 2603 Hedgcock.

Possible Citizenship Edge - Civic Engagement or Diversity Edge Hours - International

On Tuesday, February 16, from 9-10:30 a.m. in JXJ 2319, join George Heartwell, Mayor of Grand Rapids (former), as he discusses, "Climate Change:  Local Solutions to Global Problems."  When it comes to climate change, the local can impact the global! Former Mayor Heartwell draws on his decades of work creating a more sustainable Grand Rapids and insights gained from the Paris Climate Change Conference. He discusses the role that local communities can play in addressing climate change.

In partnership with the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan, NMU’s Political Science Department and International Programs office are hosting the 2016 Great Decisions Global Discussion Series in Marquette.  Great Decisions is a series of critical examinations of the most important foreign policy issues of the day (as determined by the Foreign Policy Association) presented by a roster of experts with world-renown in their fields. 

Each event will begin with the screening of a 30-minute video produced by the Foreign Policy Association, which will set the context for the foreign policy topic examined that week.  Following the video, participants will watch a webinar by the featured presenter.  Often, the webinars will be live and interactive.  Presenters webcast from Grand Rapids to other World Affairs Council of Western Michigan partners.  Following the webinar, there will be time for discussion with the local participants.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact Kevin Timlin at (906) 227-2510.

Possible Diversity Edge Hours - International

On Tuesday, February 23, from 9-10:30 a.m. in JXJ 2319, join Dr. Brett O'Bannon, Conflict Studies Program, DePauw University, as he discusses, "Never Again:  The UN's Role in Genocide Prevention."  Though 70% of Americans believe the U.S. should prevent mass atrocities worldwide, according to a recent study by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, how do we do this? Dr. O’ Bannon discusses the “Responsibility to Protect,” a philosophy aimed at early prevention of mass atrocities. While we may look to the United Nations as being one of the key players in genocide prevention, can it, or even should it, play such a large role?

In partnership with the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan, NMU’s Political Science Department and International Programs office are hosting the 2016 Great Decisions Global Discussion Series in Marquette.  Great Decisions is a series of critical examinations of the most important foreign policy issues of the day (as determined by the Foreign Policy Association) presented by a roster of experts with world-renown in their fields. 

Each event will begin with the screening of a 30-minute video produced by the Foreign Policy Association, which will set the context for the foreign policy topic examined that week.  Following the video, participants will watch a webinar by the featured presenter.  Often, the webinars will be live and interactive.  Presenters webcast from Grand Rapids to other World Affairs Council of Western Michigan partners.  Following the webinar, there will be time for discussion with the local participants.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact Kevin Timlin at (906) 227-2510.

Possible Citizenship or Diversity Edge Hours - Domestic

Northern Michigan University’s Relevant is planning a spring break trip to Texas to help with rebuilding in Garland or Rowlett, Texas. Both communities were devastated by EF-3/EF-4 tornados on December 26. At the same time, both communities have been working to clean up after last May’s rainstorms and flooding. They say everything is bigger in Texas - let’s show them that Michigan’s U.P. has as big of hearts and compassion as those in the “Lone Star State”. For more information, contact Relevant at 362-4669 or by email at relevant@nmu.edu

Possible Diversity Edge Hours - International

On Tuesday, March 8, from 9-10:30 a.m. in JXJ 2319, join Dr. Jessie Clark, Geographer, University of Nevada-Reno, as she discusses, "Our Allies in the Middle East:  The Future of Kurdistan."  Kurdistan, a mountainous area made up of parts of Turkey, Iraq, Iran, and Syria, is home to one of the largest ethnic groups in the region: the Kurds. Most in the West know them as a close U.S. ally in the Middle East and a bulwark against the expansion of the so-called Islamic State.  Dr. Clark will discuss what current regional and internal state conflicts in the greater Kurdish region mean for the future of Kurdistan.

In partnership with the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan, NMU’s Political Science Department and International Programs office are hosting the 2016 Great Decisions Global Discussion Series in Marquette.  Great Decisions is a series of critical examinations of the most important foreign policy issues of the day (as determined by the Foreign Policy Association) presented by a roster of experts with world-renown in their fields. 

Each event will begin with the screening of a 30-minute video produced by the Foreign Policy Association, which will set the context for the foreign policy topic examined that week.  Following the video, participants will watch a webinar by the featured presenter.  Often, the webinars will be live and interactive.  Presenters webcast from Grand Rapids to other World Affairs Council of Western Michigan partners.  Following the webinar, there will be time for discussion with the local participants.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact Kevin Timlin at (906) 227-2510.

Possible Diversity Edge Hours - International

On Tuesday, March 15, from 9-10:30 a.m. in JXJ 2319, join Dr. James Person, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Washington, DC, as he discusses, "Is Korean Reunification Possible?"  At the end of World War II, Korea was divided in two. Today, North and South Korea couldn’t be further apart. Concerns over North Korea’s supposed hydrogen bomb testing has created heightened tensions between North Korea and the world. Dr. Person discusses whether North and South Korea might ever be able to reconcile differences and emerge once more as a unified country. 

In partnership with the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan, NMU’s Political Science Department and International Programs office are hosting the 2016 Great Decisions Global Discussion Series in Marquette.  Great Decisions is a series of critical examinations of the most important foreign policy issues of the day (as determined by the Foreign Policy Association) presented by a roster of experts with world-renown in their fields. 

Each event will begin with the screening of a 30-minute video produced by the Foreign Policy Association, which will set the context for the foreign policy topic examined that week.  Following the video, participants will watch a webinar by the featured presenter.  Often, the webinars will be live and interactive.  Presenters webcast from Grand Rapids to other World Affairs Council of Western Michigan partners.  Following the webinar, there will be time for discussion with the local participants.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact Kevin Timlin at (906) 227-2510.

Possible Diversity Edge Hours - International

On Tuesday, March 22, from 9-10:30 a.m. in JXJ 2319, join Patrick Skinner, CIA Case Officer (former), The Soufan Group, New York, as he discusses, "ISIS:  What Don't We Know?"  Patrick Skinner is a consultant from the Soufan Group (Ali Soufan was the FBI Special Agent investigating international terrorism cases after 9/11).  He brings a fresh perspective to address the dangers ISIS poses to U.S. interests.  Born out of an umbrella organization of Al-Qaeda in Iraq, the so-called Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) burst onto the international stage in December 2013. Since then, the group has seized control of a number of critical strongholds and declared itself a caliphate. He discusses the group’s newest type of terrorism, which he calls “the new terror spectacular.”

In partnership with the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan, NMU’s Political Science Department and International Programs office are hosting the 2016 Great Decisions Global Discussion Series in Marquette.  Great Decisions is a series of critical examinations of the most important foreign policy issues of the day (as determined by the Foreign Policy Association) presented by a roster of experts with world-renown in their fields. 

Each event will begin with the screening of a 30-minute video produced by the Foreign Policy Association, which will set the context for the foreign policy topic examined that week.  Following the video, participants will watch a webinar by the featured presenter.  Often, the webinars will be live and interactive.  Presenters webcast from Grand Rapids to other World Affairs Council of Western Michigan partners.  Following the webinar, there will be time for discussion with the local participants.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact Kevin Timlin at (906) 227-2510.

Possible Diversity Edge Hours - International

On Tuesday, March 29, from 9-10:30 a.m. in JXJ 2319, join Ambassador Charles Shapiro, President of the World Affairs Council of Atlanta, Coordinator for Cuban Affairs (former), United States Department of State, as he discusses, "Cuba and the U.S.:  What Does the Future Hold."  After decades of isolation, the U.S. is taking major steps to normalize relations with Cuba. Most Americans don’t know that before diplomatic relations were restored in July 2015, the U.S. had maintained a presence in Cuba. Ambassador Shapiro served as a former Coordinator to Cuba. He still maintains a wide circle of high-level connections, giving him insight into the future of U.S.-Cuba relations.

In partnership with the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan, NMU’s Political Science Department and International Programs office are hosting the 2016 Great Decisions Global Discussion Series in Marquette.  Great Decisions is a series of critical examinations of the most important foreign policy issues of the day (as determined by the Foreign Policy Association) presented by a roster of experts with world-renown in their fields. 

Each event will begin with the screening of a 30-minute video produced by the Foreign Policy Association, which will set the context for the foreign policy topic examined that week.  Following the video, participants will watch a webinar by the featured presenter.  Often, the webinars will be live and interactive.  Presenters webcast from Grand Rapids to other World Affairs Council of Western Michigan partners.  Following the webinar, there will be time for discussion with the local participants.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact Kevin Timlin at (906) 227-2510.

Possible Diversity or Real World Edge Hours

The Rotary District 6220 Board has approved a Global Grant Scholarship available for Academic Year: 2016-2017.  

The Rotary District 6220 Global Scholar Program provides $30,000 scholarship awards for graduate studies outside the USA.  Scholars must commence studies no earlier than the beginning of the academic year in the fall of 2016 and conclude no later than December 30, 2017 and expend the scholarship funds within 12 months of starting studies.

In anticipation of The Rotary Foundation’s (TRF) 100-year anniversary in 2017, the TRF Trustees set out to develop a plan to move the foundation toward its second century of service. The plan, called the Future Vision Plan, focuses TRF-funded programs to specific areas where they will have the greatest impact by addressing priority world needs that are presently most relevant to Rotarians.   

As a result, to be eligible for a Rotary District 6220 Global Grant Scholarship, an applicant must have a background, intended graduate studies and future career plans related to at least one of the following focus areas:

  • Peace and Conflict Prevention/Resolution
  • Disease Prevention and Treatment
  • Water and Sanitation
  • Maternal and Child Health
  • Basic Education and Literacy
  • Economic and Community Development

Pre-qualification Applications must be submitted by Monday, February 29.

Further information, including the “Prequalification Application,” can be found on the District 6220 website (http://www.ridistrict6220.org/), “Foundation Information” tab, “Global Grant Scholarship” page.

Possible Diversity Edge Hours - Domestic

Volunteers are needed for the 23rd Annual Traditional Pow Wow that will be held on Saturday, March 12.  If you are interested in volunteering for any of the shifts below, please contact the Center for Native American Studies at ​906-227-1397 or nasa@nmu.edu.  Please indicate your top three choices with 1, 2, or 3.  We also welcome volunteers for multiple shifts, please indicate each shift with an "X".  Additionally, we will request you attend one or our two volunteering training opportunities which will be included in your confirmation e-mail.
 

Wednesday, March 9
2-5 p.m.

DJ Jacobetti Complex Kitchen/Prep
Please report to the Culinary Arts, 5 min. prior to start time to sign-in.  Please bring your own clean/untattered hat and apron, wear closed toe shoes and long pants. If you have longer hair, please bring a hair tie.

Friday, March 11
Noon-3 p.m.
1-4 p.m.

DJ Jacobetti Complex Kitchen/Prep
Please report to the Culinary Arts, 5 min. prior to start time to sign-in.  Please bring your own clean/untattered hat and apron, wear closed toe shoes and long pants. If you have longer hair, please bring a hair tie.

Friday, March 11
10 a.m.-1 p.m.
Noon-3 p.m.
2-5 p.m.
3-6 p.m.
5-8 p.m.
7-9 p.m.

Vandament Arena/Set up

Saturday, March 12
11 a.m.-2 p.m.
Noon-3 p.m.
1-4 p.m.
2-5 p.m.
3:30-5:30 p.m.
4-7 p.m.
6 p.m.-Done

DJ Jacobetti Complex Kitchen/Feast Help
Please report to the Culinary Arts, 5 min. prior to start time to sign-in.  Please bring your own clean/untattered hat and apron, wear closed toe shoes and long pants. If you have longer hair, please bring a hair tie.
Saturday, March 12
9 a.m.-Noon
Vandament Arena/Set-Up
Saturday, March 12
10 a.m.-1 p.m.
12:30-3:30 p.m.
3-6 p.m.
5:30-8:30 p.m.
Vandament Arena/Security
Saturday, March 12
11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
1:30-4:30 p.m.
4-7 p.m.
6:30-9:30 p.m.
Vandament Arena/General Aid/Runner

Saturday, March 12
10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
1-4 p.m.
3:30-6:30 p.m.
6-9 p.m.

Vandament Arena/Front Desk
Saturday, March 12
7:30-10:30 p.m.
Vandament Arena/Tear Down



Possible Citizenship or Diversity - International Edge Hours

Find out more about the Ireland Service Project that will be going Sunday, May 1-Monday, May 16 (approximate) by contacting Hannah Lewis at hkratz@nmu.edu.  Approximate Cost:  $3,900-$4,200 (includes airfare, accommodations, most meals, in-country transportation, and all planned lectures and cultural activities)

While staying with Irish families in Dublin during the first week, you will get to learn about their rich Irish culture as well as volunteer in a Montessori, a senior center, or with troubled youth. During the second week, you will tour the beautiful country of Ireland. Stops include the Cliffs of Moher, Connemara National Park, the Aran Islands, and Galway City. This trip will provide the perfect mix of sightseeing, exploring the Irish culture (music, food, language and customs) and history, and volunteering your time and talents to make a difference. 

Possible Diversity - Domestic, Leadership, or Real World Edge Hours

Are you looking for a chance to experience the other side of health care?  If so, please contact Upper Peninsula Home Health and Hospice, to learn about a variety of opportunities available. You can contact our Volunteer Coordinator today at 906-225-4545, e-mail us for more information at lilahn@uphomehealth.com, or follow our efforts at www.facebook.com/uphomehealth.

Our Program:

Our hospice volunteers program offers several different types of opportunities ranging from direct companion/family support volunteers, special service volunteers, special project volunteers and even group opportunities.  Those who choose to work with our hospice patients directly will work in a variety of different settings that may include the patient’s personal homes, local hospitals, nursing homes, assisted livings, and memory care facilities.

As a volunteer with our hospice program, you will discover flexibility, specialized training and opportunities for personal growth.  Our team approach supports your role in making a difference in the lives of our patients and their families.  You will also find the support of our Hospice Foundation which provides resources for volunteer projects and our Make-a-Memory Program.

Current Opportunities:

Companion/family support volunteers work to provide support directly to patients and families.  To ensure that all volunteers are equipped for the challenge of working with those dealing with a life limiting illness, we require that volunteers complete orientation and training sessions.  It’s important that volunteers understand the philosophy of hospice and are aware of the specific ways we work to serve the community.  Volunteers spend their visits being present, listening, helping with errands or light household tasks or providing short respite opportunities for caregivers.

Special service volunteers are able to share their special skills of music or art therapy, massage therapy, and reminisce therapy.  If you have any talents you would like to share, contact us today.

Special project volunteers groups help with special projects that are vital in providing indirect support to our patients and their caregivers.  Many of these groups consist of resident volunteers from the local assisted living and nursing facilities.  Projects include but are not limited to:  heated comfort bags, fleece tie blankets, recipes-in-a-jar/horticulture therapy kits, and cards, letters and flowers.

Group volunteer opportunities exist for your group, club, or organization to become involved with hospice.  Upper Peninsula Hospice will provide an informative presentation or on-site training for any interested group.

To inquire about volunteer opportunities call our volunteer coordinator at 906-225-4545 or check us out at www.facebook.com/uphomehealth.

Possible Diversity Edge Hours - Domestic

NAS 101 - Anishinaabe Language, Culture & Community I 
An introduction to Anishinaabemowin language including grammar, vocabulary, idioms and syllabics.  Students will learn to read, write and speak basic Anishinaabemowin.  This course also promotes the preservation of Anishinaabe culture by examining various facets of Anishinaabe everyday life and contemporary issues

NAS 102 - Anishinaabe Language, Culture & Community II 
An in-depth study of Anishinaabemowin language.  This course is a continuation of materials introduced in NAS 101.  Students will focus on higher-level use of the language and will apply it in situations related to contemporary Anishinaabe cultural issues and community structures.

NAS 204-06 Native American Experience
A study of the development of Native American history, culture, attitudes, and issues from the prehistoric era to the contemporary scene, focusing on native culture in the Great Lakes region.  Shared native world view, contact experience and native peoples' contributions to world culture are an important part of the course.

NAS 212 - Michigan and Wisconsin Tribes, Treaties and Current Issues (Education and Political Science)
Examine the 23 federally recognized tribes of Michigan and Wisconsin.  Questions to be explore - how have treaties between tribal nations and federal government shaped history in this region?  What is sovereignty?  What are treaties and what treaties impact this region?  Discussions may also include tribal enterprises, urban Indian communities, and timely issues that arise in the news.

NAS 280 - Storytelling by Native American Women 
This course examines a myriad of historic and contemporary aspects of native life through the eyes and stories of Native American women.  Subjects include customs, culture, family, generations, mothers, daughters, grandmothers, art, education, fiction, poetry, political activism, and spirituality.

NAS 315 - History of Indian Boarding School Education (Anthro, History, Sociology)
The history of the initiation, development, alteration, and demise of the federally mandated Indian boarding school education experience in the U.S. and Canada. Intergenerational and contemporary repercussions, both positive and negative, within indigenous societies are considered.

NAS 320 - American Indians:  Identity and Media Images (English and Oral Traditions)
An analysis of the identity and images of American Indians portrayed within the historic and contemporary media.  Perpetuation of stereotypes and appropriates or distorts cultural images, symbols, beliefs, stories and contributions by native people to the media will be explored.

NAS 330 - Native Cultures and the Dynamics of Religious Experience
An examination of the traditional philosophies of the native peoples in the Great Lakes region as well as an exploration of how Christianity has influenced native peoples and communities.  Students will learn about the historical impacts, positive and negative, that organized religion has had on Indian country.

NAS 340 - Kinomaage - The Earth Shows Us the Way
Kinomaage, when translated, is "Earth shows us the way."  Students will examine various plants of the Northwoods that have been traditionally used by the Anishinaabeg.  Students will also examine the close relationship between Anishinaabeg peoples, culture, and the Earth while comparing that relationship to modern day society's view of the environment.

NAS 342 - Indigenous Environmental Movements
An exploration of the historical and cultural foundations of the paradigms that led to the ecological exploitation of Indigenous lands.  Students will examine how Indigenous cultures today are resisting domination and working to regain, protect and nurture their lands, the planet, and their ways of life.

NAS 420 - Issues within the Representation of American Indians (Anthro, History, Sociology)
The histories, legacies and continuing debates regarding the display of Native Americans and especially how representations of Indians may reflect colonialist attempts of appropriation, marginalization, and erasure of indigenous cultures as well as Native American resistance, accommodation, and celebration.

NAS 485 - American Indian Education
Students will explore significant American Indian education policy from pre-colonial times to the present day.  Students will investigate treaties with educational provisions, current U.S. federal Indian education law; standards-based reform and Native American inclusion.  Through online chat rooms, students will discuss these issues with individuals from different parts of the world.

NAS 488 - Native American Service Learning Project
This is a capstone course for the Native American Studies minor. Students will complete an approved service learning project in Native American Studies under the guidance of the Director of the Center for Native American Studies upon completion of all other requirements for the minor.

PS 495 - International Political Economy for the 2016 Winter Semester 
What caused the 2008 global recession? Is the economy driven by politics, the laws of supply and demand or exploitation of the working class? What should we do about growing economic inequality in this country? Recent studies show that the top 1% will own half of the world in 2016. Is this at all acceptable or will there be a severe political backlash reminiscent of the 1930’s with the dual creation of Nazism and Communism?

International Political Economy explores the dynamic ways in which markets, states and societies interact with one another within a context of globalization. The course combines a focus on the main theoretical and methodological approaches used in the study of IPE. Class material will analyze historical and contemporary issues such as national security and economic governance as well as energy, environmental and human security.

*Knowledge of economics not required.

Class time will be Tuesday's from 6:30-9:50 p.m. with Hanna Samir Kassab, Ph.D. (hkassab@nmu.edu).

 

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