1965 - 1971 Common Learning Course Descriptions

Group I: Humanities I, II, III, IV
The humanities sequence is designed to introduce the student to a study of man as a unique creative being. Its focus will center upon man’s most distinguished and enduring achievements-intellectual, spiritual, aesthetic, and ethical---as revealed in history, philosophy, religion, literature, and the arts.

The primary aim of the first course in Humanities is to develop the student’s ability to write and speak effectively. The readings will introduce the subject matter of the succeeding courses, each of which will concentrate upon a specific epoch in man’s experience. Speaking and writing will continue to be emphasized throughout the sequence.

CL 111 HUMANITIES I 4 cr.
Designed to develop the student’s ability to write and speak effectively. In addition to regular practice in these skills, it will develop them through reading, critical examination, and discussion of some of man’s most significant experiences and ideas.

CL 112 HUMANITIES II 4 cr.
Prerequisite: CL 111
Employing and refining his writing and speaking, the student in this course will concentrate upon a study of the modern world and will be offered opportunities to understand and appreciate human creativity—the forms of its art and the nature of its ideas and institutions.

CL 211 HUMANITIES III 4 cr.
Prerequisite: CL 112
A study of some of the significant intellectual and cultural roots of the modern world as they originate and develop in the ancient world.

CL 212 HUMANITIES IV 4 cr.
Prerequisite: CL 211
In this course the student will study the dynamic period of the renaissance and the power of its cultural force in shaping the modern world.

Group II: Natural Science I, II

CL 121 NATURAL SCIENCE I 4 cr.
CL 121 PHYSICAL SCIENCE 4 cr.
A study of some basic discoveries and concepts of the physical sciences, including their historical development, applications and social implications. Emphasis is placed on the observation of natural phenomena and the exercise of experimental techniques and modes of perception and reasoning that lead to understanding nature. Topics include astronomy, motion, gravitation, energy, gas, laws, heat, atomic theory, laws of chemical combination and molecular structure.

CL 122 NATURAL SCIENCE II 4 cr.

CL 122 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 4 cr.
A study of some fundamental concepts of the biological sciences, including their historical development, applications, and social implications. Laboratory includes both observational and experimental studies. Topics include cell biology, homeostasis, reproduction, genetics, evolution, and ecology.

CL 121-122P NATURAL SCIENCE (Pilot Program) 4 cr.
A study of the mathematical and scientific approach to problem investigation. Subject matter from mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology is treated in disciplinary discussions and interdisciplinary comparisons. Topics include principles of observation, reasoning and experimental design; formation of conclusions, concepts and theories. Emphasis is placed on the use of experimental observations in reasoning, which will produce valid conclusions and concepts.

CL 123 NATURAL SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS 4 cr.
A study of the mathematical and scientific approach to problem investigation. Subject matter from mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology is treated in disciplinary discussions and interdisciplinary comparisons. Topics include principles of observation, reasoning and experimental design; formation of conclusions, concepts and theories. Emphasis is placed on the use of experimental observations in reasoning, which will produce valid conclusions and concepts.

CL 221 EARTH SCIENCE 4 cr.
Prerequisite: Minimum of sophomore standing.
This course deals with the essential concepts in meteorology, descriptive astronomy and space science, geophysics, oceanography, and geology. Three hours of lecture and one two hour lab per week.

Group III: Social Science I, II

CL 131 SOCIAL SCIENCE I 4 cr.

CL 131 PROBLEMS OF THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD 4 cr.
A study in depth of selected contemporary world problems. Emphasis is placed upon both the disciplinary and interdisciplinary nature of the problem. Topics covered include population, poverty, urbanization, and resources. The course is offered jointly by the Departments of Economics, Geography, Political Science, and Sociology.

CL 132 SOCIAL SCIENCE II 4 cr.

CL 132 PROBLEMS IN CONTEMPORARY AMERICA 4 cr.
Prerequisite: CL 131
A continuation of CL 131. Topics covered include government regulation, underdeveloped states, and civil rights. An interdisciplinary course which deals with such problems as urbanization, poverty, human rights and the American society.

CL 133 PROBLEMS IN SOCIAL ECONOMICS 4 cr.
Emphasis on contemporary economic issues such as economic justice and pubic order, income maintenance and poverty, war, peace, and the draft, economic and political freedom.

CL 134 THE AMERICAN PEOPLE, THEIR POLITICS AND THEIR VALUES 4 cr.
A study of American society, including an overview of the sources of prevalent political-moral values along with an assessment of American political behavior and policies.

CL 138 THE STUDY OF AMERICAN SOCIETY 4 cr.
A study of American society, its culture and its people, its organization and patterns of disorganization. Topics under consideration include social influences in American culture upon the development of personality, a component analysis of the American population, family structure, social class and race differentials, collective behavior including mobs and race riots, American cities and urban problems, the industrial and technological effects upon American society and religious subcultures.

CL 139 CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY 4 cr.
An examination of the cultural conditions under which man perceives, occupies, and uses his habitat in order to develop a way of thinking about man's interaction with his environment.

Group IV

CL 480 SENIOR SEMINAR 4 cr.

CL 490 SENIOR SEMINAR 4 cr.
Prerequisite: Senior standing and completion of all other common learning requirements. Not open for graduate credit.
A seminar designed to draw together students from different disciplines, each of which can contribute toward an understanding of significant issues. The topics will vary from year to year according to student and faculty interest. Grading in this course will be: Honors (H), Satisfactory (S), or Unsatisfactory (U).