Glossary of Academic Terminology

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AA: Associate of Arts egree.

ACT: American College Testing rogram is an assessment used for undergraduate admission purposes.

AS: Associate of Science Degree.

AS: College of Arts and Sciences. This abbreviation refers to the College of Arts and Sciences.

APP-CEEB: APP-CEEB is a testing program conducted by participating high schools. NMU grants credit for specific courses based on satisfactory scores on the examinations. Students should specify that their scores be sent to Northern Michigan University. Transfer students who have taken APP-CEEB exams should request that a copy of their test scores be sent to NMU. Credit will be awarded if the test is accepted by the university and the minimum score has been earned.

Academic Advisor: Member of the faculty or staff who is trained to assist students in planning their certificate or degree program.The academic advisr works with students on their academic progress, course selection, career and major options, and navigating the academic process at NMU. Students can find out who their advisor is on mynmu.nmu.edu by following these directions at www.nmu.edu/acac.

Academic Calendar: A listing of important dates and deadlines for students. The academic calendar is located at /records/node/26. Academic Computing: Staff in Academic Computing Services (ACS) provides support to students and faculty for general computing needs. Classroom and lab facilities are available, and the Help Desk offers technical and software support for laptop computers. Current information about Academic Computing can be found at www.nmu.edu/acs.

Academic Deans: Each college has a Dean to oversee the operation of his or her particular college. Effective for Fall 2004, Darlene M. Walch is the Dean of Academic Information Services, Dr. Terrence Seethoff is the Dean for the College of Arts and Sciences, Dr. Cameron Howes is the Dean of the College of Health Sciences and Professional Studies and Dr. James Scheiner is the Dean of the Walker L. Cisler College of Business.

Academic Dismissal: Students who have previously been academically suspended from NMU, re-enter, and are academically suspended again, are dismissed from the university. Dismissed students may only re-enter NMU through an appeal to the Admissions and Academic Policies Committee (AAPC) of the Academic Senate. See the Important Issues for Dismissed Students Web page for more information.

Academic Hold:A hold may be placed by the Academic Policies Committee against the enrollment of a student who has been suspended or expelled for failure to maintain the standards outlined in the Academic Proficiency Policy. Holds applied in these situations are based upon recommendations of the Admissions and Academic Policies Committee. Contact the Academic and Career Advisement Center at C.B. Hedgcock, Room 3302, 906-227-2971 for more information.

Academic Honesty: Students have an obligation to abide by accepted standards of academic honesty, which dictate that all scholastic work shall be original in nature. Procedures and penalties pertaining to academic dishonesty are outlined in the NMU Student Handbook. Academic Information Services: AIS is located in the Harden Learning Resources Center and includes the Lydia Olson Library, University Archives, Academic Computing, Instructional Media Services and Instructional Technology. Academic Load, Student: A normal academic load for undergraduate students is 16 credits during the fall or winter semesters and 12 credits during a summer session. The minimum number of credit hours required for a baccalaureate degree is 124. Some majors require students to take an academic load in excess of 16 credits, but never more than 20. In general, students are advised not to enroll in more than 20 credits in the fall and winter semesters or more than 16 credits in the summer. They may be permitted to do so only if they have established a cumulative grade point average of 3.50 or higher. First semester freshmen, however, are not allowed to take more than the maximum credits in a semester (16 or 20). A written petition to carry more than the maximum credits in a semester should be submitted to the Registrar’s Office by the student’s advisor.

Academic Probation: Students are placed on academic probation when their cumulative GPA drops below 2.00. Students on academic probation put themselves in jeopardy of suspension/ dismissal and are not able to graduate from any degree or certificate program at NMU. Students placed on academic probation must sign an Academic Probation Agreement that makes provisions such as meeting regularly with an academic advisor, taking courses designed to improve academic performance, attending all course meeting, repeating courses (if necessary), and attaining a specified semester GPA (see chart below) based on their number of GPA credit hours. Failure to satisfy the semester GPA requirement will result in a one-year suspension.

Overall GPA Credit Hours

Semester GPA to Remain at NMU

Less than 28 credit hours

1.70 semester GPA or higher

28 to less than 56 credit hours

1.80 semester GPA or higher

56 or more credit hours

2.00 semester GPA or higher

Academic Proficiency Policy: The Academic Proficiency Policy defines the academic standards students must meet to continue their enrollment at NMU. Students must maintain a minimum overall GPA (NMU plus transfer) of 2.00 to be in academic good standing. Students with an overall GPA below this level will be placed on academic probation and will have to attain certain semester GPA requirements to remain at NMU. All students must attain good standing and a minimum NMU GPA of 2.00 before a degree, certificate, or diploma may be conferred.

Academic Senate: Academic Senate is the body that reviews all programs at NMU. The Senate can implement changes to a certain major or program.

Academic Standard: The status of an NMU student determined by the student's cumulative GPA. Academic standards at NMU include: Good Standing; Transfer Warning; Academic Probation; Immediate Academic Suspension; Academic Suspension and Academic Dismissal.

Academic Standing: (Class Standing) Students are classified according to the number of credit hours earned numbered 100 level or above.  080 and 090 remedial courses do not count toward class standing. Freshman: 0-27 earned hours; Sophomore: 28-55 earned hours; Junior: 56-87 earned hours; Senior: 88 earned hours and up.

Academic Suspension: Any student on academic probation who fails to attain specific semester GPA requirements will be suspended from the university.  After a period of one calendar year, such students may re-enter the university by completing the standard re-entry process for suspended students. See the Academic Standards Web page.

Academic Suspension, Immediate: New freshmen and transfer students who have eight or more overall NMU credit hours and an overall GPA of less than 1.00 (including 080 and 090 courses) will be suspended immediately. After a period of one calendar year, such students may re-enter the university by completing the standard re-entry process for suspended students. See the Academic Standards Web page.

Academic Year: Consists of a Fall Semester, a Winter Semester followed by an optional Summer College. Starting and ending dates for each semester are posted to the Academic Calendar.

Accreditation: Northern Michigan University is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and fully accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).  Some individual departments and colleges are recognized by the various accrediting agencies in their respective fields.  Consult the Northern Michigan University Undergraduate Bulletin for departmental accreditation.

Activity fee: Each semester students pay a $30 activity fee which funds programs on campus such as comedians, lecturers and concerts.

Add: Registering for an additional course after the advance registration period. Adding courses which are full requires a signed Add Card from the instructor teaching the course. All Add Cards are turned in a the Student Service Center, C.B. Hedgcock, Room 2201, 906-227-1221, for processing.

Add/Drop Period: Days set aside by the university for students to change their schedule by adding or dropping courses. Students may add courses provided that seats are still available. Add/Drop Period ends on the first Thursday of the semester at 5 p.m. Address Change: All off-campus students are required to report their local and/or permanent address to the university. Students should notify the university of a change of address within five days of a move. Students who fail to change their address when they relocate will miss important university mailings.Because of the confidential nature of information mailed to students, Northern Michigan University's address change policy requires written consent of the student. If you are a currently enrolled student, you can update your address and telephone number on the Web at mynmu.nmu.edu.

Administrative Withdrawal: Withdrawal of a student from all classes by the university. Usually for non-payment of tuition, suspension, or for other reasons.

Admission: The process whereby a person is accepted as a student at the university and allowed to register for classes.

Advance Placement Credit: Credit awarded toward a degree as a result of scores received on national examinations (CLEP or AAP-CEEB) or by departmental recommendation.

Advance Placement, Department Evaluation: Academic departments at Northern Michigan University may recommend that advance placement credit be awarded to currently enrolled students in degree-granting programs based on their life experience or educational achievements from nontraditional sources. The evaluation measurement for the recommendation is determined within the department and may consist of a comprehensive examination, portfolio review, demonstration of a level of competency in a skill area, or documented verifiable life experiences. If a department is recommending advance placement credit that would apply to general electives, the recommendation must also be approved through the student’s major department.

Advance Placement Policy: Northern Michigan University grants advance placement credit through three national testing programs: CLEP (College Level Examination Program), APP-CEEB (Advanced Placement Program of the College Examination Program), and International Baccalaureate and through academic departmental recommendation based upon previous life or educational experiences. When students receive advance placement credit, the course title and credit is recorded on the transcript. Since no letter grades are given, the courses are not computed in the student’s grade point average, but they do count as credits earned toward the degree. Advance placement credit will be awarded with the following limitations—32 credits for a baccalaureate degree, 16 credits for an associate degree, and eight credits for a certificate.

Advance Registration Period: (Registration Week) The time set aside by the university for continuing students to begin registering for the next semester. Students can check the Academic Calendar for dates and times.

Advisor: Students who are undeclared about a choice of curriculum and who do not wish to declare a major are assigned advisers from a core of faculty and staff selected to work with "undeclared" students. These students should work closely with their advisers to build course schedules satisfying general graduation requirements and also providing some exposure to new fields of interest. During the semester, undeclared students should work with academic advisers in the Academic and Career Advisement Center (ACAC) to discuss potential majors. They may also take advantage of career planning activities coordinated by the ACAC, as well as career counseling offered by the Counseling and Consultation Services. After selecting a major, students are assigned to an advisor in the department which houses their major. Student should maintain close contact with their advisor and keep their own personal file of their academic progress. Students are ultimately responsible for meeting the academic requirements for their desired degree. Advisor, Changing: Students can change their advisor at the Academic and Career Advisement Center, C.B. Hedgcock, Room 3302, 906-227-2971, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Advisor Registration Hold: An electronic hold placed upon a student’s record which is removed after a student has seen his or her advisor. The removal allows a student to register for classes. The university places a hold on all students who have completed less that 18 hours at Northern Michigan University or whose Northern Michigan University and/or cumulative GPA is less than 2.00. These holds will affect both full and part-time students. You can determine your class standing and registration status by reviewing your student data on the Web, or by contacting the Student Service Center, C.B. Hedgcock, Room 2201, 906-227-1221. These holds can be removed only by your academic department after you have met with your advisor. Contact your academic advisor or Academic and Career Advisement Center, C. B. Hedgcock, Room 3302, 906-227-2971, for more information

Americans with Disabilities Act Accommodations: If an individual has a need for disability related accommodations or services, they can inform the Coordinator of Disability Services in the Disability Services Office in the Dean of Students Office, C.B. Hedgcock, Room 2001, 906-227-1737. Reasonable and effective accommodations and services will be provided to individuals if requests are made in a timely manner, with appropriate documentation, in accordance with federal, state and university guidelines.

APP-CEEB Exams: APP-CEEB is a testing program conducted by participating high schools. NMU grants credits for specific courses based on satisfactory scores on the examinations. Students should specify that their scores be sent to Northern Michigan University. Transfer students who have taken APP-CEEB exams should request that a copy of their test scores be sent to NMU. Credit will be awarded if the test is accepted by the university and the minimum score has been earned. For more information about passing scores at NMU, see the APP-CEEB Exam Equivalencies table.

Appeal, Suspension:Although suspensions are rarely reversed by appeal, circumstances sometimes arise that are beyond a student’s control which would warrant an appeal for early reinstatement. To appeal a suspension, you must convince the appeal body that these circumstances led to your suspension and they have been resolved. A complete appeal must contain: an appeal letter from you explaining the extenuating circumstances which led to your suspension (with name, NMU IN, and current address); written documentation verifying these extenuating circumstances and illustrate that they will no longer impede your performance; letters of support from an instructors and/or your academic adviser are helpful.

Archives: The Central Upper Peninsula and Northern Michigan University Archives are under the direction of a professional archivist who manages the records of the university, and collects, organizes, preserves and encourages the use of historical materials relating to NMU and the central Upper Peninsula

Associate Degree: Awarded after completing a program of study, usually designed to be completed in two academic years. NMU offers an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Associate of Applied Arts (A.A.A.), Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.), Associate of Business (A.B.), Associate of Technology (A.T.).

ASNMU: The Associated Students of Northern Michigan University is the study body government for NMU.  If you would like more information, contact the ASNMU office at 227-2452. Athletic Eligibility: For athletic eligibility purposes, all athletes are required to carry a minimum of 12 credit hours each semester and maintain satisfactory progress. Satisfactory progress is based upon satisfactory completion of courses in an athlete’s designated program, as well as his or her overall academic record.At the beginning of and beyond their fifth semester of third year of enrollment, all athletes are required to designate a program of study leading toward a specific baccalaureate degree and carry a minimum of 12 credit hours in a designated program of study leading toward a specific degree.  If an athlete designates a program of study leading toward a specific baccalaureate degree prior to their fifth semester or third year of  enrollment are required to abide by the same rules governing the third year athlete. Please inform your advisor that you are an athlete and must abide by this rule. Failure to do so may cause you to lose your academic eligibility. Your advisor will complete the Academic Adviser Affirmation Form. It is your responsibility to hand-carry this form to the Registrar's Office, C.B. Hedgcock, Room 2202.

Attempted Hours: (AHRS designation on transcript.) All credit hours for courses in which a student was at one time enrolled and received any grade, including a “W”.Attempted hours include all of the coursework on record for a student at NMU: courses passed (including repeated courses), courses failed, AP credit, credit by exam and courses transferred from other colleges or universities. Attendance, Class: Students are expected to attend all class meetings of courses in which they enroll. Students who are absent from classes because of participation in university-sponsored activities are excused. Students are responsible for all class work whether or not their absence is excused. Most professors will announce their attendance policy on the first day of class or will state their policy in the syllabus. If no mention of attendance is made, ask! Many professors count attendance towards class participation grades, and students who miss classes may receive lower grades.

Audit, Degree: A degree audit is a listing of course work and requirements that the student must complete before becoming eligible for a certificate or degree. This audit is prepared by hand each semester for eligible students in order to assist them in preparing for their degrees. Degree audits are automatically mailed to eligible students each semester just prior to course registration. Degree audits are mailed in mid October during the fall semester and mid March during the winter semester. Special requests for a degree audit can not be honored due to the volume of degree audits produced each semester. Students who are not eligible to receive an audit must meet with their academic advisor to determine graduation requirements. Course work that is in progress is not considered to be complete and will appear on the degree audit. Students should review their audit carefully with their advisors prior to advance registration. Copies of prior degree audits can be obtained from the student's academic advisor or requested from the Registrar's Office, C.B. Hedgcock, Room 2202. Audit Eligibility, Degree:A degree audit is a listing of course work and requirements that the student must complete before becoming eligible for a certificate or degree.  An audit is prepared each semester for eligible students in order to assist them in preparing for their degrees.  To be eligible for an audit, a student must be currently enrolled in a degree granting program and have declared a major, concentration and minor, if required, and have acquired the minimum earned hours toward a degree according to the following chart:

Baccalaureate Degree 87* earned credit hours
Associate Degree 32 earned credit hours
Certificate 16 earned credit hours

Audit/Auditor/Auditing: A student who registers for and attends a class but does not want to receive credit for the course.  An “AU” will appear on the transcript. Students must have a Permission to Audit a Course Form (PDF) filled out by the instructor and then return the form to the Student Service Center, C.B. Hedgcock, Room 2201, by the ninth calendar day of a semester.

Bachelors (baccalaureate) Degree: Awarded after completing a program of study, usually designed to be completed in four academic years. NMU offers a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A), Bachelor of Music Education (B.M.E.), Bachelor of Science (B.S.), Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.),  and Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.).

Blue Book: A small notebook with soft blue covers, available at the University Bookstores, that some professors require students to use when writing essay exams. If students are required to use a blue book, the professor will instruct them to bring one (or more) to the exam, or will note this requirement on the syllabus.

Board: A term used for a meal plan as in "room and board" applied to university dorms or apartments. Board of Trustees: Governing authority of Northern Michigan University. Michigan's Constitution, which was adopted in 1963, granted constitutional autonomy to Northern Michigan University. It also vested governing authority in an eight-member Board of Trustees. Each trustee is appointed by the Governor to serve an eight-year term, subject to confirmation by the Senate. Trustees may also be reappointed at the pleasure of the Governor.

Bulletin: College catalog; the main academic publication of the university which lists all programs of study, requirements for diplomas, certificates and degrees, and course descriptions. NMU has an Undergraduate Bulletin and a Graduate Bulletin.

Calendar and Credit System: Northern Michigan University operates on a semester calendar with two full semesters in the academic year and an intensive summer college.  Unit of credit is a 15 week semester with a minimum of 124 credits required for a bachelor’s degree and a minimum of 32 credits for a master’s degree.  Northern Michigan University does not provide class ranking.

Capstone Course: A senior-level course. Normally among the last courses taken for bachelor degree completion. The course reviews the major issues, themes, theories and research findings for the major discipline.

Catalog: The Northern Michigan University Undergraduate Bulletin is a college catalog; the main academic publication of the university which lists all the programs of study, requirements for a diploma, certificate, associate or baccalaureate degree, and course descriptions.

Certificate: Awarded after completing a program of study usually designed to be completed in one academic year. Changing Advisor: Students can change their advisor at the Academic and Career Advisement Center, C.B. Hedgcock, Room 3302, 906-227-2971, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Changing Major:It is recommended that students meet with an academic advisor from the department of the major in which they are interested. If a student is unsure of what to declare as a major, it is recommended that they meet with an advisor in the Academic and Career Advisement Center, C.B. Hedgcock, Room 3302. For most academic majors, declaring or changing your major can be done in one of the following ways:

How to Change Your Major

In the department in which you are seeking a new major.
Academic and Career Advisement Center, 906-227-2971.
On the Web at www.nmu.edu/advising.
Students who want to declare any of the following majors must go directly to the department:
Major Department
Cosmetology Admissions Office
Criminal Justice Criminal Justice Department
Education Education Department
English English Department
Psychology Psychology Department
Sociology/Social Work Sociology/Social Work Department
Students with 87 or more credits should also inform the Registrar's Office of this change so that they may begin preparation of a new degree audit.

Class Standing: Students are classified according to the number of credit hours earned numbered 100 level or above.  080 and 090 remedial courses do not count toward class standing. Freshman: 0-27 earned hours; Sophomore: 28-55 earned hours; Junior: 56-87 earned hours; Senior: 88 earned hours and up.

CLEP Exam: Examination taken to receive advanced placement credit for a specific subject or course at a college or university. NMU considers college composition with essay, humanities, social sciences and history and natural sciences as freshman examinations. Credit earned through the freshman examinations may be applied toward the liberal studies program requirements only. Students with more than 26 college semester credit hours are ineligible to receive credit at NMU through CLEP freshman examinations. Other examinations measure achievement in specific college courses. Students may not earn credit for CLEP subject examinations if the student has credit in the course, was previously or currently enrolled in the course, or has credit in a higher level course. The determination of a higher level course is the decision of the department head who may in writing approve the examination. Transfer students who have taken CLEP examinations should request that a copy of their test scores be sent to NMU. Credit will be awarded if the test is accepted by the university and the minimum score has been earned. CLEP scores are only accepted from national testing centers. The CLEP code for NMU is 1560. For more information about passing scores at NMU, see the CLEP Exam Equivalencies table Web page. For more information about CLEP exams, visit the CLEP Homepage.

Closed Course: A term used during the registration process to indicate that a course has reached its maximum enrollment limit and is therefore "closed" to further registration.

Cognate: A course related to the courses in a major program or to a degree requirement. Cognate courses are often offered by departments outside of the degree program. Cognate is a term used by some departments to describe the part of your academic program which functions basically like a minor.

College: An administrative division of Northern Michigan University housing one or more academic departments or schools.

Commencement Ceremony: Commencement is a public ceremony held twice each year to bestow degrees upon students. A student who completes the requirements for a vocational diploma, certificate, associate degree, or baccalaureate degree may participate in commencement.  Students who plan to participate in commencement must select the appropriate coding from the course scheduling booklet when registering for graduation. Commencement is an optional activity. Students who do not participate in commencement at the time they qualified may not participate in a later commencement unless they now qualify for the awarding of an additional vocational diploma, certificate, or degree.

Communication Studies, Formal: One of five baccalaureate graduation requirements that baccalaureate students must complete. Students select one formal communication studies course for a minimum of three credits. These courses are designed to introduce students to the ways in which information and ideas are expressed using a communication system other than English. Such courses should foster the student’s ability to conceptualize and communicate in an orderly, rational manner. Characteristics of a communication system include: (1) possession of a grammar; (2) operation from an established set of rules; (3) reasoning properties such as deduction, inference drawing, and problem solving. This includes courses in languages and those in which the central focus of the course is on statistics, computers or formal logic.Refer to the Liberal Studies Program and Graduation Requirements section of the NMU Undergraduate Bulletin for additional information.

Communication, Foundations of: One of five baccalaureate graduation requirements that baccalaureate students must complete. Students take two English composition courses for a minimum of six credits. Students who complete the courses should be able to generate ideas for writing and speaking; organize ideas logically; use correct and effective grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation; and rehearse, critique, and revise their oral presentations. The first course in foundations of communication is EN 111 College Composition I (4 cr.). Refer to the Liberal Studies Program and Graduation Requirements section of the NMU Undergraduate Bulletin for additional information. Communication, Official University: Every enrolled student automatically receives a university computer account which provides access to instructional files and software, e-mail, free dial-in access from off campus and other resources. Students are required to maintain this account which will be used by the university to send time-critical information to students. Northern Michigan University will use a student’s NMU e-mail account as its primary means of communicating official university business, including legally required information. If a student uses a non-university e-mail address, the student must forward their university e-mail to the non-university account. This can be done by visiting the Web site: http://myuser.nmu.edu/ and utilizing the e-mail forwarding wizard. Complaints about Grades: Student's who believe that they have been unfairly graded in a course should follow the appeals procedure outlined in the Student Handbook. For further details, please contact the Dean of Students Office, C.B. Hedgcock, Room 2001, 906-227-1700.

Complete Withdrawal: The process whereby a student leaves the university without completing the semester. Students who decide to leave Northern Michigan University without finishing the semester for which they are currently enrolled must complete a Notice of Withdrawal form at the Dean of Students Office.  Students can withdraw by mail provided that the student states his or her reason for withdrawing, includes his or her student identification number, a photocopy of a valid form of identification (e.g., student I.D. card, drivers license) and signs a letter requesting the withdrawal. Students may also fax their withdrawal requests to the Dean of Students Office at 906-227-1714. Following the proper withdrawal procedures ensures (1) that the maximum allowable proportion of fees due to the student will be refunded, (2) that the appropriate grades will be recorded on the student's transcript, and (3) that the individual's records will be properly maintained in the event of future enrollment at Northern Michigan University or transfer to another university or college. Students who withdraw from the university after 5 p.m. of the tenth week of classes will receive "F" grades. In extreme cases exceptions to this policy may be made with the written approval of the Dean of Students Office. For more information about withdrawing from the university, contact the Dean of Students Office, C.B. Hedgcock, Room 2001, 906-227-1700, e-mail dso@nmu.edu.

Communications, Official University: Every enrolled student automatically receives a university computer account, which provides access to instructional files and software, e-mail, free dial-in access from off campus and other resources. Students are required to maintain this account, which will be used by the university to send time-critical information to students. Northern Michigan University will use a student’s NMU e-mail account as its primary means of communicating official university business, including legally required information.

Concentration: A concentration (or emphasis) is a block of courses that are more similar to one another than to others in the degree program. Concentrations may be recorded on the transcript.

Continuing Education Courses and Programs: Credit courses at convenient times and locations for the non-traditional learner. Summer College, undergraduate and graduate courses offered by the Continuing Education and Sponsored Programs, 401 Cohodas Hall, 906-227-2103. Some courses are offered at off-campus outreach locations.

Continuing Education Unit (CEU): Recognition for participation in a non-credit program or workshop. Record of CEU's can be obtained from the Continuing Education and Sponsored Programs, 401 Cohodas Hall, 906-227-2103.

Corequisite: A corequisite course is a course which may be taken concurrently with or successfully completed prior to the course for which it is required. Course Description: A published description for all university courses. The course descriptions appear in alphabetical order according to their course letter designations in the Northern Michigan University Undergraduate Bulletin  or the Northern Michigan University Graduate Bulletin. These descriptions include any prerequisites (requirements students must satisfy before registering for the course), corequisites (requirements students must satisfy while taking the course), the amount of credit hours applied for each course, and, where relevant, the hours devoted to lecture, discussion, and laboratory.

Course ID: The letters and numbers assigned to a course to distinguish it from another course. (Example: EN 111.)

Course Level: 000 - 999 remedial or developmental; 100 - 199 freshmen; 200 - 299 sophomores; 300 - 399 juniors; 400 - 499 seniors*; 500 - 999 graduate level. *Some 400 level courses are available to be taken for graduate level credit, see NMU Graduate Bulletin for more information.

Course Offerings Timetable: A listing of when a specific course is offered at NMU such as fall, winter or summer semesters. The Course Offerings Timetable is a basic guide in planning future course scheduling. Course Numbering System: 000-099 no credit toward baccalaureate degree; 100 freshman; 200 sophomore; 300 junior; 400 senior; 500 graduate level, 600 education specialist, 999 professional development only-not available for degree credit. Some 400 numbered courses can be taken for graduate level credit as indicated on transcript. Consult the Northern Michigan University Graduate Bulletin.  Course descriptions and bulletins are available at: www.nmu.edu/records. The following chart highlights the course numbering system at Northern Michigan University:

000 - 999* remedial or developmental
100 freshmen
200 sophomores
300 juniors
400** senior
500 - 999 graduate level

*Remedial or developmental courses (000 - 099) do not meet requirements for associate or bachelor degrees, but may meet requirements for vocational diplomas.  Remedial or developmental courses do not count in the cumulative totals for class standing and are not calculated into the Northern Michigan University grade point average. **Some 400 level courses can be taken for graduate-level credit. See the Graduate Bulletin, Course Descriptions section for more information.

Course Registration: The date and time that a student can register is determined by how many credit hours he or she has earned. Check the Registration Week Schedule for dates and times. Registration instructions are posted on the Registrar's Office Web pages. It is strongly recommended that you meet with your advisor prior to registering, If you experience problems that you cannot resolve while registering for courses, contact the Student Service Center, C.B. Hedgcock, Room 2201, 906-227-1221.If you experience computer-related registration problems, contact the Help Desk, 116 Learning Resources Center, 906-227-2468.

Course Scheduling Book: A Web-based schedule of courses offered each semester which lists each course, time and room location. Current Scheduling Books can be obtained on the Registrar's Web pages. Printed copies are no longer distributed by the university, but a printable version is available on the Web.

Course Sequence Number (call number): A series of numbers assigned to a course at registration to distinguish one section of a particular course from another section of the course. Course Substitution: The faculty advisor with the support of the department head may substitute a required course in the students major or minor with another departmental course when there has been a curriculum revision and the required course listed is no longer offered; the student is in the final semester before graduation and one required course is offered in time that conflicts with another required course, or a required course is not being offered during that final semester; the same course is required in the student's minor, second major or minor; or the faculty advisor has waived a requirement and has selected another course to complete the required hours. Course Substitution form should be attached to the student's degree audit prior to applying for graduation.

Course Syllabus: A description, table of contents or outline of course content, requirements, textbooks, and assignments provided by the instructor of the to their students. Course Waiver:The faculty advisor with the support of the department head may waive a required course in the students major or minor when there has been a curriculum revision and the required course listed is no longer offered; the student is in the final semester before graduation and one required course is offered in time that conflicts with another required course, or a required course is not being offered during that final semester; the same course is required in the student's minor, second major or minor; or the faculty advisor has waived a requirement. The Course Waiver form should be attached to the student's degree audit prior to applying for graduation.

Credit Hour: The value assigned each course depending upon the length of time it meets during a week. Generally one credit is assigned for each 50 minute lecture hour per week and a 15 week semester.

Credit Load: The total number of credit hours for which a student can register for during a specific semester.

Credit, Unit of: 15 week semester.

Cumulative GPA: All honor points earned divided by all credit hours taken from all colleges or universities attended.

Curriculum: A complete program of study which leads to a baccalaureate degree.