2014 Annual Security Report

(Clery Act)

Campus Security Act (Clery) Requirements:

The Campus Security Act requires colleges and universities to:

  • Publish an annual report each year by October 1 that contains three years of campus crime statistics and required campus security policy statements.
  • Disclose crime statistics for the campus, public areas immediately adjacent to or roads running through the campus, and certain non-campus facilities. Statistics are gathered from campus police or security, local law enforcement, and other University officials who have “authority and responsibility” for student and campus activities.
  • Provide “timely warning” notices of those crimes that have occurred and pose an ongoing “threat” to students, employees and guests of the university.
  • Disclose a public crime log for crimes that have occurred on campus or within the patrol jurisdiction of the University Police and are reported to the University Police.
  • Northern Michigan University Public Safety and Police Services is responsible for preparing and distributing the report. Public Safety and Police Services works with many other departments and agencies in obtaining the required statistics to complete the report (i.e. Dean of Students, Housing and Residence Life, Student Activities and the Marquette City Police Department, Marquette County Sheriff’s Department, Chocolay Police Department, and Michigan State Police).

PUBLIC SAFETY AND POLICE SERVICES - 102 Services Building, 906-227-2151, Emergency 911

The NMU Public Safety and Police Services Department is staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 12 months a year. The staff members include highly trained and dedicated law enforcement officers. These officers are responsible for the overall safety of the university community.

Whether you want to report a crime, need information on crime prevention or have questions on parking, Public Safety and Police Services is available 24 hours a day.

For more information, contact Public Safety and Police Services at the number provided above.

Public Safety and Police Services Mission and Value Statement:

To assist in providing a safe and secure living and learning environment for the University community consistent with the values and mission of the University.

Northern Michigan University Public Safety and Police Services is an organization comprised of people of integrity, committed to providing quality service to the university community in an honest, fair, professional and courteous manner.

A partnership will be pursued with the University community based on mutual trust, confidence, commitment and communication to maintain and improve the quality of life and promote the safety and welfare of our campus.

The members of this agency pledge collectively and individually to constantly grow, develop and engage in reassessment to meet the current and future problems and challenges of our university community.

The values of Northern Michigan University Public Safety and Police Services embody the department’s philosophy, vision and values. These values serve as a foundation and catalyst upon which the department establishes its policies, strategy, tactics, and its actions. In completing its mission to protect and serve the university community of Northern Michigan University – the department as a whole and each of its members as individuals are responsible for adhering to all the principles and values that make up the law enforcement code of ethics.

UNIVERSITY POLICING AND SECURITY POLICIES

University police officers, law enforcement authority, and interagency cooperation.

The Board of Trustees of Northern Michigan University exercised their authority under Public Act 120, passing a resolution granting the same powers and authority as granted by law to peace and police officers in the State of Michigan to the officers of the Public Safety and Police Services Department of Northern Michigan University.  In addition, our officers are sworn Deputy Sheriffs for Marquette County. University police officers must have a bachelor degree and are required to attend a regional police academy governed by the Michigan Commission on Law Enforcement Standards. Officers are required to attend mandatory in-service training throughout the year to enable them to perform more efficiently and more safely.

Interagency Cooperation

Northern Michigan University Public Safety and Police Services works closely with several agencies; i.e. Marquette City Police Department, Marquette County Sheriff’s Department, Chocolay Police Department and the Michigan State Police. We rely on these relationships for support on several levels. In addition to sharing critical information, the Department of Public Safety and Police Services has immediate contact with the Regional Dispatch 911 Center. This arrangement gives us immediate access to mutual aid and support from area agencies.

Reporting Criminal Incidents and Other Emergencies

All students, employees, and guests should promptly report criminal incidents, accidents, and other emergencies to the Department of Public Safety and Police Services by dialing 911. Individuals may also report incidents in person at the department headquarters located at 102 Sugar Loaf Avenue located in the services building.

Dispatchers are available 24 hours a day to answer calls. In response to a call, Public Safety and Police Services will dispatch an officer to take the incident report. All reports filed are forwarded to the Prosecutors office and Dean of Students for review and potential action. Public Safety and Police Services will investigate a report when deemed appropriate.  Additional information obtained via the investigation will also be forwarded to the Dean of Students Office.

If assistance is needed from the Marquette City Police Department or other law enforcement agency, Public Safety and Police Services will contact the appropriate department.

This publication contains information about on-campus and off-campus resources. This information is made available to provide NMU community members with specific information about the resources available in the event they become the victim of a crime.

Crimes should be reported to the University Police department to ensure inclusion in the annual security report and to aid in providing timely warning notices to the community, when appropriate.

The university has Blue Light Emergency Phones throughout campus for use during emergencies. By pressing the red button on the blue light phones, users can communicate directly with our dispatcher.  Locations are digitally displayed to the dispatch center.

Emergency Preparedness

Northern Michigan University recognizes the need to be prepared for critical incidents. Under the guidance of the Emergency Response Team, several departments and offices work together to prepare for, prevent, respond to and recover from emergency situations.

Emergency Response

The Public Safety and Police Services website includes guidelines for the Campus community; University emergency procedures; pre-emergency planning and performance expectations; “shelter in place”, evacuation plans, along with additional contingency plans.  University departments are responsible for developing contingency plans and continuity of operations plans for their staff and areas of responsibility. The University conducts emergency response exercises each year, such as table-top exercises and tests of its emergency notification systems.  The tests are designed to assess and evaluate the emergency plans and capabilities of the institution and its response teams.

Campus Security Authority

Campus Security Authority is a Clery-specific term that encompasses four groups of individuals and organizations associated with an institution.

  • Any individual or individuals who have responsibility for campus security but who do not constitute a campus police department or a campus security department (e.g. an individual who is responsible for monitoring the entrance into institutional property).
  • Include individuals who provide security at a campus parking kiosk, monitor access into a campus facility, and act as event security or escort students around campus after dark.
  • Any individual or organization specified in an institution’s statement of campus security policy as an individual or organization to which students and employees should report criminal offenses.
  • An official of an institution who has significant responsibility for student and campus activities, including, but not limited to, student housing, student discipline and campus judicial proceedings.  An official is defined as any person who has the authority and the duty to take action or respond to particular issues on behalf of the institution.
  • If someone has significant responsibility for students and campus activities, he or she is a campus security authority.

What do CSAs do?

The function of a campus security authority is to report to the official or office designated by the institution to collect crime report information such as the campus police or security department, those allegations of Clery Act crimes that he or she concludes were made in good faith.

What shouldn’t a CSA do?

A campus security authority is not responsible for determining authoritatively whether a crime took place; that is the function of law enforcement personnel.  A campus security authority should not try to apprehend the alleged perpetrator of the crime.  That too is the responsibility of law enforcement.  It’s also not a CSA’s responsibility to try and convince a victim to contact law enforcement if the victim chooses not to do so.

 

Campus Security Authorities

(number of positions if more than one)

 

 

Academic & Career Advisement

Director

Assistant Director - Jacobetti

Assistant Director – Orientation

Academic & Career Counselor

Coordinator – Academic Support Services (3)

Academic Affairs, Provost & VP

Provost & Vice President

Assistant Provost

Academic Information Services – Library

Circulation Supervisor

Academic Information Services

Dean

Admissions

Director

Assistant Director (9)

Associate Director

Senior Admissions Counselor (3)

Admissions Counselor (3)

AIS / Computer Help Desk

Help Desk Manager

Art & Design, School of

Director / Associate Dean

Arts & Sciences, College of

Dean

Associate Dean

Auxiliary Services

Director

General Manager – Golf Course

Executive Secretary

Biology

Department Head

Bookstore

Manager

Assistant Manager

Business Intelligence/ Information Services

Director

Business, W.L. Cisler College of

Dean

Career Services

Assistant Director

Chemistry

Department Head

Clinical Sciences, School of

Director / Associate Dean

Communication & Performance Studies

Department Head

Continuing Education/Workforce Dev.

Special Assistant to the President

Assistant Director

Counseling & Consultation Services

Counselor / Professor

Assistant Professor (2)

Department Head

Criminal Justice

Department Head

Dean of Students

Assistant Vice President & Dean

Associate Dean

Assistant Dean

Degree Evaluation

Assistant Registrar

Dining Services – Central Office

Director of Dining Services

Director of Conference & Catering

Associate Director - Retail Operations

Manager – Program Development

Operations Manager – Food/Nutrition

Marketing Manager

Dining Services – Marketplace

Operations Manager (2)

Service Manager

Dining Services – University Center

Operations Manager

Disability Services

Assistant Dean of Students

Earth, Environ. & Geographical Sciences

Department Head

Economics

Department Head

Education, Leadership & Public Services

Director

Engineering & Planning

Associate Vice President

Assistant Director

Associate Director

Architectural Specialist

Engineering Technology

Department Head

English

Department Head

Enrollment Management & Student Services

Vice President

Equal Opportunity

Director

Facilities Operations

Associate Director

Finance & Administration, VP

Vice President

Administrative Assistant

Finance & Planning

Senior Director

Senior Financial Analyst

Financial Aid

Director

Associate Director

Assistant Director (2)

Financial Aid Officer

Senior Financial Aid Counselor

Financial Aid Counselor

Financial Aid Technician

Financial Services

Assistant Manager

Coordinator – Operations & Technology

Principal Account Clerk

Senior Account Clerk

First Year Programs

Assistant Dean

Graduate Education & Research

Assistant Provost

Health Center

Medical Director

Pharmacist

Physician’s Assistant

Medical Office Manager

Health Promotion

Health Promotion Specialist

Health Sciences & Professional Studies

Dean

Health & Human Performance

Associate Dean

History

Department Head

Housing & Residence Life

Assistant Director

Assistant Director – H&RL-Facilities

Associate Director

Resident Director (10)

Coordinator – Apartment Services

Service Specialist

Human Resources

Director

Assistant Director (3)

Manager – Payroll

Identity, Brand & Marketing

New Director

Assistant Vice President

Information Technology & Technical Services

Chief Technology Officer

Director – Micro Repair Services

Director – Technical/Wireless Services

Director – Telecom/Wireless Services

Assistant Director – Micro Repair Services

Institutional Research

Assistant Provost

Intercollegiate Athletics/Rec Sports

Athletic Director / Special Assistant to the President

Associate Director (4)

Sports Information Manager

Concessions Manager

Assistant Concessions Manager

Head Coach – Golf

Head Coach – Skiing

Head Coach – Cross Country

Head Coach – Women’s Soccer

Head Coach – Ice Hockey

Head Coach – Women’s Basketball

Head Coach – Football

Head Coach – Men’s Basketball

Head Coach – Volleyball

Head Coach – Women’s Swimming & Diving

Assistant Coach – Football (7)

Assistant Coach – Ice Hockey (2)

Assistant Coach – Women’s Basketball

Assistant Coach – Men’s Basketball

Assistant Coach – Volleyball

Assistant Coach – Track & Field

Assistant Facility Manager

Recreation Sports Programming Manager

Assistant Athletic Trainer (3)

Coordinator – Hockey Operations

Fitness/Informal Recreation Manager

International Programs

Director

Coordinator – International Students

Coordinator – Education Abroad/Exchange Program

Coordinator – International Enrollment

Learning Resources Division

Director

TV Station Manager

Radio Station Manager

Public TV Producer/Director

Broadcast Operations Supervisor

Radio Program Operations Manager

AV Operations Supervisor

Mathematics & Computer Science

Department Head

Military Science

Coordinator – Workforce Development & Training

Modern Languages & Literature

Department Head

Multicultural Education & Resource Ctr.

Associate Director

Music

Department Head

Native American Studies, Center for

Director

NMU Foundation

Vice President for Advancement

NMU – U.S. Olympic Training Site

Wrestling Program Coordinator

Operations Manager

Assistant Coach – Greco-Roman Wrestling

Nursing

Director

Physics

Department Head

Plant Operations

Associate Director

Supervisor – Building Services (2)

Supervisor – Maintenance/Energy Management

Supervisor – Grounds

Political Science

Department Head

President, Office of

President

Director – External/Corporate Relations

Assistant to the President

Administrative Assistant (2)

Printing & Mail Services

Manager

Psychology

Department Head

Public Safety & Police Services

Director

Assistant Director

Deputy Director

Investigator

Crime Prevent/Community Policing Specialist

Occupational/Environmental Health Specialist

Police Specialist (2)

Police Officer (7)

Security Police Specialist

Security Police Officer (4)

Training Coordinator – Public Safety Institute

Parking Services Coordinator

Police Dispatch

Principal Secretary

Purchasing

Manager

Registrar

Registrar

Assistant Registrar

Registration & Scheduling

Assistant Registrar

Seaborg Center

Director – Seaborg Center

Director – Upward Bound

Coordinator – Precollege Programs

Simply Superior Catering/Events

Sales Manager

Social Work

Department Head

Sociology/Anthropology

Department Head

Student Enrichment, Center for

Director

Associate Director

Coordinator

Student Service Center

Manager

Student Support Services

Director

Counselor

Coordinator – Academic Support

Tech & Occupational Sciences

Department Head

 

 

Monitoring and Recording Criminal Activity at Off-Campus Organizations

The university relies on its close working relationships with local law enforcement agencies to receive information about incidents involving students off campus. The Department of Public Safety and Police Services will actively investigate any crime information it receives concerning or involving a member of the campus community. If the University is notified of a situation in which a campus community member is the victim of a crime, the department may issue a Campus Safety Alert, detailing the incident and providing tips so that other community members may avoid similar incidents.

Confidential Reporting Procedures

If you are a victim of a crime and do not want to pursue action within the University System or the criminal justice system, you may still want to consider making a confidential report. A designated campus security authority can file a report with the department of Public Safety and Police Services on the details of the incident without revealing your identity.  The purpose of a confidential report is to comply with your wish to keep the matter confidential while taking steps to ensure the future safety of yourself and others. With this information the University can keep an accurate record of the number of incidents involving students, determine where there is a pattern of crime with regard to a particular location, method, or assailant, and alert the campus community to potential danger. Reports filed in this manner are counted and disclosed in the annual crime statistics for the institution. Title IX requires that all reported incidents of sexual assaults must be investigated by the University and the University must take steps to remedy the situation. If you do not want the complaint pursued through the program or the courts, the University must still investigate and respond. If the victim/survivor requests confidentiality or asks that the complaint not be pursued, the Title IX Coordinator will take all reasonable steps to investigate and respond to the complaint consistent with this request.

Confidential Reporting Procedures (Counselors)

As a result of the negotiated rulemaking process which followed the signing into law, the 1998 amendments to 20 U.S.C. Section 1092 (f), clarification was given to those considered to be campus security authorities.  Campus “Pastoral Counselors” and Campus “Professional Counselors”, when acting as such, are not considered to be a campus security authority and are not required to report crimes for inclusion into the annual disclosure of crime statistics.  As a matter of policy, they are encouraged; if and when they deem appropriate, to inform persons being counseled of the procedures to report crimes on a voluntary basis for inclusion into the annual crime statistics.

The rulemaking committee defines counselors as:

Pastoral Counselor:

An employee of an institution, who is associated with a religious order or denomination, recognized by that religious order or denomination as someone who provides confidential counseling and who is functioning within the scope of that recognition as a pastoral counselor.

Professional Counselor:

An employee of an institution whose official responsibilities include providing psychological counseling to members of the institution’s community and who is functioning within the scope of his or her license or certification.

Crime Prevention Education and Awareness

Crime prevention is a top priority of the department. Together with other campus offices, the department provides programs to enhance personal safety, teach proactive crime-reduction strategies, and help community members develop self-esteem which contributes to a healthy living environment.

The university’s crime prevention program relies on the foundation of a layered approach by being proactive in the area of patrolling campus, crime prevention education and training, building and area security surveys. This type of approach relies on the team approach of eliminating or minimizing criminal opportunities, whenever possible, and encouraging community members to take responsibility of their own and others safety.

Members of this department are available to assist any individual or group in planning, presenting and coordinating programs of interest or concerns.

The cooperation and involvement of students themselves in a campus safety program is absolutely necessary.  Students must assume responsibility for their own personal safety and the security of their personal belongings by taking common sense precautions.  Although the campus is well-lit, any student, male or female, may feel more comfortable using the University Police Escort Service when returning to a residence hall late at night (906-227-2151).  Valuable items such as stereos, cameras, and televisions should be marked with engraving instruments provided by the University Police at no charge.  Bicycles should be registered with the University Police and be secured with a sturdy lock.  Students with vehicles must park in the assigned area and should keep them locked at all times.  Valuables should be locked in the trunk.

TRAINING

Rape Aggression Defense

Rape Aggression Defense is a program of realistic, self-defense tactics and techniques. The RAD System is a comprehensive course for women that begins with awareness, prevention, risk reduction and avoidance, while progressing on to the basics of hands-on defense training. RAD is not a martial arts program. Our courses are taught by certified RAD Instructors and provide you with a workbook/reference manual. This manual outlines the entire Physical Defense Program for reference and continuous personal growth. The RAD System of Physical Defense is currently being taught. The growing, wide spread acceptance of this system is primarily due to the ease, simplicity and effectiveness of the tactics, solid research, legal defensibility and unique teaching methodology. The Rape Aggression Defense System is dedicated to teaching women defensive concepts and techniques against various types of assault, by utilizing easy, effective and proven self-defense/martial arts tactics. Our system of realistic defense will provide a woman with the knowledge to make an educated decision about resistance.

We operate on the premise that a spontaneous violent attack will stimulate a natural desire to resist, on the part of the victim (supported by research). We educate women about "The Flight or Fight Syndrome", while showing them that enhancing their option of physical defense is not only prudent, but a necessity if natural resistance is to be effective.

Safety and survival in today's world requires a definite course of action. We provide effective options by teaching women to take an active role in their own self-defense and psychological well-being.

Operation Identification Program

Operation Identification is a program that is a system for marking personal property.  The participant marking property uses an engraver, a diamond pen, or a tungsten-carbide marking pen.  Students’ then engrave their driver’s license on the item and keep a permanent record of their property.  Operation Identification has been proven to reduce thefts in communities where the program has been implemented.  The reason is people are reluctant to steal things, which are marked because it increases the risk of getting caught, further making items hard to fence or sell.  In addition, items identified can be put into the law enforcement information system (LEIN) and can be returned to the owner if found.  Students can request an operation identification program in their residence hall by calling the Crime Prevention office at 2154 or Public Safety at 2151.  Some items students might want to record are radios, stereos, televisions, computers, appliances, bikes, and cameras to mention a few.

Parent Orientation / Freshman Orientation

Sexual Assault

Alcohol Awareness

Bystander Training

Athletic Department Training

UN 100 – Freshman Seminar

HP 200 – Physical Well Being

 

POLICY REGARDING THE POSSESSION AND USE OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES BY STUDENTS

Alcoholic Beverages

Northern Michigan University seeks to encourage and sustain an academic environment which respects individual freedom and promotes the health, safety, and welfare of all members of its community. In keeping with these objectives, the university has established policies and guidelines governing the possession, sale, and consumption of alcoholic beverages on the university campus that conform to the laws of Michigan. Underage possession and /or consumption of alcoholic beverages is not permitted on property owned or controlled by the university. Intentionally or knowingly selling, or intentionally or knowingly "furnishing" alcoholic beverages to persons under the age of 21, or to persons obviously inebriated, is not permitted on property owned or controlled by the university. Legal consumption and possession of alcoholic beverages is limited to designated locations only. The complete policy and guidelines concerning alcoholic beverages is published annually in the university Student Handbook (http://www.nmu.edu/dso/studenthandbook).

 

Illegal Drugs

The university does not condone the possession, use, or distribution of marijuana, LSD or other hallucinogens, narcotics or any other illegal drugs by anyone in any campus facility. Any individual known to be possessing, using, or distributing such drugs are subject to campus disciplinary action and criminal arrest, imprisonment and/or fine according to state law.

In reference to the above policy, the requirements and parameters of several federal laws, the use or possession of Marijuana, including marijuana prescribed for medicinal purposes, is not permitted on the campus of Northern Michigan University. There is no “medical necessity” exception for marijuana under federal law (Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act).

3.14 SEXUAL ASSAULT RESPONSE/PREVENTION POLICY

3.14.1 Introduction 

Acquaintance rape or date rape is the most prevalent form of sexual assault on college campuses. A reported sexual assault will be treated with the highest degree of concern by the University.

Sexual assault, including date rape, violates the University’s Student Code (http://www.nmu.edu/dso/studenthandbook).  Sexual assault as defined in this policy is criminal sexual conduct, and a violation of the Michigan Penal Code. A University student charged with sexual assault may be subject to University disciplinary action up to and including expulsion and may be prosecuted pursuant to the Michigan Penal Code

The University affirms the need for a broad-ranging sexual assault prevention education program. Prevention education and awareness efforts are essential in order to better ensure a safe learning and living environment on our campus.

This policy provides the following information to members of the University community:

  • Definition of sexual assault;
  • Policy concerning sexual assault victims/survivors;
  • University response to reported sexual assault, including services available to victims/survivors of sexual assault and accused students;
  • Education and prevention efforts and programs; and
  • Information regarding periodic review of this Policy.

3.14.2 Definition 

Sexual assault is sexual contact without consent. More specifically, “sexual assault” for purposes of this Policy means any of the forms of criminal sexual conduct described in Sections 520b through 520g of the Michigan Penal Code (MCL 750.520b - .520g) involving a University student as the victim/survivor and/or alleged perpetrator. Sexual assault consists of sexual intercourse without consent, forcible sodomy or sexual penetration with an inanimate object, the intentional touching of an unwilling person’s intimate parts (defined as genitalia, groin, pelvic region, inner thigh, breast or buttocks, or clothing covering them), or forcing an unwilling person to touch another’s intimate parts. These acts must be committed either by force, threat, intimidation, or by taking advantage of someone’s helplessness or inability to consent of which the alleged perpetrator was aware or should have been aware. Regardless of the relationship that exists between the parties, if consent is not given or force or coercion is used against a party, any sexual contact is within the definitions of criminal sexual contact and sexual assault.

“Consent” means a voluntary agreement to engage in sexual activity proposed by another. “Consent” requires mutually understandable and communicated words and/or actions demonstrating agreement to participate in proposed sexual activity. “Without consent” may be communicated by words and/or actions demonstrating unwillingness to engage in proposed sexual activity.  Sexual activity will be considered without consent if the victim/survivor was unable to give consent because of a condition of which the accused student was or should have been aware, such as alcohol and/or other drug intoxication, coercion, and/or verbal or physical threats, including being threatened with future harm.

Sexual assault is intrinsically injurious and degrading, and will be treated as resulting in injury for the purposes of the University Student Code, Regulation 2.3.15, General Regulatory Statement; Regulation 2.3.22, Personal Abuse, which prohibits acts which injure, threaten, endanger, or degrade a member of the University community; and Regulation 2.3.6, Compliance with University Policy. Use or abuse of alcohol or other drugs by a person charged with a sexual assault does not diminish, and may increase, personal responsibility. Providing or making available to a victim/survivor any substance (e.g. alcohol or other drugs, including but not limited to GHB, Rohypnol and Ecstasy) may increase the personal responsibility of the assailant. The person reporting an assault will not be charged with a violation of the Student Code for use of alcohol or other drugs. The same criminal offenses and penalties apply in cases of acquaintance rape or date rape as in cases of rape involving a stranger. A victim/survivor of sexual assault may be either female or male.  The University will investigate the complaint, and University Student Conduct charges may be brought against the accused student, regardless of where the conduct occurred.

Victims/survivors who are not students at Northern Michigan University but have been sexually assaulted by a Northern Michigan University student, may file a sexual assault complaint against the student with the Dean of Students Office or Public Safety and Police Services and request that the student be charged with a violation of the Student Code and/or the Michigan Penal Code. Because the University does not stand in a special academic relationship with a non-student victim/survivor, other university services are not available to non-students.

3.14.3 Policy Concerning Sexual Assault Victims/Survivors 

If you are the victim/survivor of a sexual assault which is reported to the University, it is the policy of the University that:

  • You and the matter you report will be treated with the greatest concern and seriousness, regardless of your gender or the gender of the accused student.
  • Your name will not be released to the public or the media.
  • You may talk to university officials about the sexual assault without your name being disseminated, except as is necessary to meet federal requirements.
  • The right to confidentiality, both of the victim/survivor and of the accused student, will be respected insofar as it does not interfere with the University’s legal obligation or ability to investigate allegations of misconduct when brought to its attention, and to take corrective action when it is found that misconduct has occurred.
  • You will be treated with dignity, courtesy, sensitivity, and understanding and you will not be prejudged or blamed for what occurred.
  • You will be provided with information regarding your options for reporting the sexual assault, and your right to make choices based on this information will be respected.
  • Title IX requires that all reported incidents of sexual assault must be investigated by the University and the University must take steps to remedy the situation. If you do not want the complaint pursued through the student conduct program or the courts, the University must still investigate and respond.
  • It is a violation of University policy to intimidate, discipline, discharge, or harass any individual because she or he has filed a complaint, instituted proceedings, assisted an investigation, or formally or informally objected to sexual harassment and/or discriminatory practices. If retaliation occurs, the incident should be reported either to the Equal Opportunity Office or Human Resources (faculty and staff) or to the Dean of Students Office (students).
  • You will be advised of, and if you desire, assisted in receiving services from the University department’s and from community service agencies that provide assistance to victims/survivors of sexual assault.
  • University staff will neither coerce you to report a sexual assault as a lesser offense nor prevent or discourage you from reporting a sexual assault to another person or authority.
  • The Dean of Students Office will assist you with any academic issues that may arise due to the situation.
  • Upon your request, the University staff will take any reasonable steps to prevent unnecessary or unwanted contact or proximity with the accused student.
  • If you file a complaint with Public Safety and Police Services, staff from that office will investigate your complaint. You will be notified of victim’s/survivor’s rights and remedies accorded in the Crime Victim’s Rights Act and you will be kept up-to-date on the status of the investigation.
  • The sexual history of the victim/survivor is not considered relevant to the truth of the allegation; therefore, information regarding sexual history external to the relationship between the victim/survivor and the accused student will not be considered in student conduct hearings.
  • You will be made aware of, and assisted in exercising, any options provided under law regarding the mandatory testing of alleged sexual assault perpetrators for communicable diseases and notification of the results of the testing.
 

3.14.4 University Response to Reported Sexual Assault 

There are a variety of avenues available for making a report of a sexual assault and obtaining support and other assistance. The following University departments can be of special assistance to victims/survivors of campus sexual assault:

  • Public Safety and Police Services, 911 (Emergency) or 227-2151 (102 Services Building)
  • Dean of Students Office, 227-1700 (2001 Hedgcock)
  • The Health Center, 227-2355 (Gries Hall)
  • Counseling and Consultation Services, 227-2981 (3405 Hedgcock)
  • Housing and Residence Life Office, 227-2620 (the apartment services coordinator, any resident director, resident adviser, or community adviser)*
  • The Health Promotion Office, 227-1455 (1201-1202 University Center)
  • Title IX Coordinator, 227-2420 (EEO, 158 Services Building)

*Resident advisers and community advisers are obligated to share sexual assault reports, including names, with specific professional Housing and Residence Life Office staff for possible follow-up activities and to ensure reporting as required by law.

All the University departments listed above work together closely to provide support and assistance and to review available services and options. Students who have been sexually assaulted are strongly encouraged to report the incident as described above so that the University may investigate, charges can be initiated within the University student conduct system, and/or criminal charges may be pursued against the accused student.

In cases in which Public Safety and Police Services is not the first office contacted by the victim/survivor, information regarding the incident will be reported to that office in accordance with the Student Right to Know and the Clery Act. This report will not include the name of the victim/survivor or any identifying information without the victim’s/survivor’s consent. In addition, Public Safety and Police Services is required to report information concerning criminal acts on a daily and annual basis under the requirements of the Clery Act and the Uniform Crime Reporting Act.

A report of sexual assault will initiate a response from the University as explained below:

All reports of sexual assault must be reported to the Title IX Coordinator for the University. All reports are promptly investigated to determine what occurred and to take steps to resolve the situation. The University is required to take immediate action to eliminate any form of possible harassment, prevent its recurrence, and address its effects.  A typical investigation takes approximately 60 calendar days following receipt of the complaint.  The timing of the filing of the complaint (e.g. at the end of a semester) or the lack of information available to the investigator may result in the investigation taking longer than the typical 60 days.  Both parties will be given periodic status updates during the investigation. Both parties will receive written notification of the outcome of the complaint and both parties may file an appeal. If appeals are filed, both parties will receive written notification of the outcomes.

The University will inform and obtain consent from the victim/survivor before beginning an investigation. If the victim/survivor requests confidentiality or asks that the complaint not be pursued, the University will take all reasonable steps to investigate and respond to the complaint consistent with the request for confidentiality or request not to pursue an investigation. If the victim/survivor insists that his or her name or other identifiable information not be disclosed to the accused student, the University’s ability to respond may be limited. A request for confidentiality will be weighed against the following factors: the seriousness of the alleged assault; the victim’s/survivor’s age; whether there have been other assault complaints about the same individual; and the accused student’s rights to receive information about the allegations if the information is maintained by the University as an “education record.” The University will inform the victim/survivor if it cannot ensure confidentiality. Even if the University cannot take disciplinary action against the accused student because the victim/survivor insists on confidentiality, it will pursue other steps to limit the effects of the alleged assault and attempt to prevent its recurrence.

.01       Public Safety and Police Services: When a report of a sexual assault is received, Public Safety and Police Services will immediately assign a specially trained officer to investigate the incident and work with the victim/survivor through all stages of the investigation, prosecution and/or University student conduct system action. The officer will also inform the victim/survivor of other support services available.

.02       The Dean of Students Office: The Dean of Students Office will provide information to the victim/survivor about options for pursuing a charge against the accused student through the University’s student conduct system. The victim/survivor will be able to express his/her preferences as to whether formal Student Code charges are pursued how the charges are written and if the student conduct process continues. The Dean of Students Office will work with Public Safety and Police Services as appropriate while investigating the complaint. The University will protect the victim/survivor as necessary, including taking interim steps before the final outcome of the investigation. The victim/survivor will be given his/her options to avoid contact with the accused student and be allowed to change academic or living situations as appropriate and possible.

.03       The Health Center: The Health Center provides services to NMU students, faculty and staff who have been victims/survivors of sexual assault. The physician provides examination, treatment, and information about the possibility of venereal disease and pregnancy, and provides referrals to other support services as appropriate. Health Center hours are from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. throughout the school year. If a student is in need of emergency medical services after 5 p.m. or on weekends, he or she should go to Marquette General Hospital Emergency Room (225-3560). Note: If possible, when receiving medical care after a sexual assault it is important to have physical evidence collected for possible future legal action.

.04       Counseling and Consultation Services: Counseling and Consultation Services provides support to students dealing with the psychological impact of a sexual assault. The staff will provide assistance in decision making regarding reporting of the assault to Public Safety or the Dean of Students Office, contacting parents or significant others, modification of living arrangements, handling academic schedules and commitments, etc. Services are also provided to students who come to the Center for other reasons and in the course of treatment disclose a past sexual assault. Strict confidentiality is maintained.

.05       Housing and Residence Life Office: The apartment services coordinator, any resident director, resident adviser, or community adviser can provide immediate support and assistance to a student who reports a sexual assault, as well as to other students who may be involved. Staff will inform the victim/survivor of the services available from Counseling and Consultation Services, Public Safety and Police Services, the Health Center, the Marquette General Hospital Emergency Room, and the Dean of Students Office, and will help the victim/survivor obtain those services that are desired. These staff members can also be helpful when the student returns to his/her residence. In addition, the Housing and Residence Life Office staff will provide alternative living arrangements upon request, if the victim/survivor and the accused student live close to one another.

.06       Title IX Coordinator: The Coordinator can assist with all aspects of the reporting procedure, and will coordinate an investigation into a complaint. This office is also responsible for coordinating campus-wide sexual assault education, and for identifying trends or key areas of concern which may be addressed through information and education. If the victim/survivor requests confidentiality or asks that the complaint not be pursued, the Coordinator will take all reasonable steps to investigate and respond to the complaint consistent with this request. The Coordinator will inform the victim/survivor if she cannot ensure confidentiality when weighed against the four factors previously noted.

.07       Other Support Services: Faculty and staff who are contacted by someone who has been sexually assaulted are encouraged to provide non-judgmental support, to respect the victim’s/survivor’s confidentiality, and to consult with, or refer the victim/survivor to Public Safety and Police Services, the Dean of Students Office, or Counseling and Consultation Services.  All reports of sexual assault, except those reported solely to Counseling and Consultation Services, must be reported to the Title IX Coordinator.

3.14.5 Prevention Education 

Northern Michigan University provides ongoing prevention education of faculty, staff, and students in an effort to decrease the incidence of sexual assault.

.01       Faculty/Staff Prevention Education: A copy of this policy will be sent annually to all new faculty and staff. Staff members of those offices which are most likely to deal with prevention/response to sexual assault--Public Safety and Police Services, the Dean of Students Office, Title IX /Equal Opportunity Office, Counseling and Consultation Services, the Health Center, and the Housing and Residence Life Office--will receive regular in-service training to review office and University policies regarding the prevention of and most effective responses to sexual assault.

.02       Student Prevention Education: This policy will be distributed at the beginning of each semester by email notice, student announcement, and is available online at http://www.nmu.edu/dso/studenthandbook. To request a hard copy of the policy, contact the Dean of Students Office (227-1700), or Public Safety and Police Services (227-2151), or any office listed above.  The University also provides a variety of programs on sexual assault prevention to students:

  • Yearly Programs: Each year during a session at orientation, information concerning sexual assault is presented. It is covered during every HP200 course; completion of this course is a graduation requirement.  A sexual assault program is also made available to all coaches and athletes. Material providing information about safety, sexual assault, and acquaintance rape is available on the following websites:

 

Dean of Students Office (http://www.nmu.edu/dso/)

Counseling and Consultation Services (http://www.nmu.edu/counselingandconsultation/node/28 )

Health Promotion Office (http://www.nmu.edu/healthpromotions/node/40 )

Public Safety and Police Services (http://publicsafety.nmu.edu/assault.htm)

Housing and Residence Life (http://www.nmu.edu/housing/safety.shtml)

Additionally, residence hall staff encourage and support residence hall student programs which focus on healthy relationships, personal safety, and sexual assault prevention.

  • Programs Offered on Request: Counseling and Consultation Services, the Health Promotion Office, and Public Safety and Police Services present sexual assault prevention programs tailored to the needs of student groups. These offices encourage interested student groups to call and schedule a presentation.

3.14.6 Periodic Review of Policy 

This policy will be reviewed biannually by a committee composed of representatives from Public Safety and Police Services, the Dean of Students Office, Title IX Coordinator/Equal Opportunity Office, Counseling and Consultation Services, Housing and Residence Life, the Health Promotion Office, and two students appointed by ASNMU. Other individuals may be included as appropriate. The Dean of Students will convene the committee. Any substantive changes recommended by the review committee are subject to the approval of the Board of Trustees.

3.15 Victim’s Rights Policy

3.15.1 Introduction

Northern Michigan University is committed to ensuring that the rights of an individual who is the victim of an act of violence, sexual assault, and non-forcible sex offenses are protected.  All students will be afforded these rights in addition to the rights acknowledged in 3.14.3 concerning sexual assault victims, and 3.16 Sexual Harassment, Consensual Relations Policy.

3.15.2 Specific Rights

Students who are the victim of a sexual offense or an act of violence (as defined in Section 16 of Title 18, United States Code), that violates the Student Code or other University Policy when said act is committed by another student will have rights to the following information:

  • The name of the student who perpetrated the act of violence or sexual offense.
  • The type of violation that was committed and any charges issued.
  • The opportunity to make a recommendation with regard to any disciplinary action taken, or sanction imposed, if any.
  • The general outcome of the sanction imposed by the university, if any.

3.15.3 Notification

The Dean of Students shall be responsible for advising the victim of his or her rights.

SEX OFFENSE DEFINITIONS

Sexual Assault

An offense classified as forcible or non-forcible sex offense under the uniform crime reporting system of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

  • Rape – Penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.  This definition includes any gender of victim or perpetrator.
    • Sexual penetration means the penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, or by a sex-related object.
    • This definition also includes instances in which the victim is incapable of giving consent because of temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity (including due to the influence of drugs or alcohol).
    • Physical resistance is not required on the part of the victim to demonstrate lack of consent.

Crime Statistics

The Department of Public Safety and Police Services maintains a close relationship with the area police departments to ensure that it is notified of any crime report that is made directly to them.

The Department of Public Safety and Police Services will disclose any crime report made directly to any local law enforcement agency by a member of the campus community.

Definitions of Reportable Crimes

Arson:

Any willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house, public burning, motor vehicle or aircraft, personal property of another, etc.

Murder:

Criminal Homicide-Manslaughter by Negligence:  The killing of another person through gross negligence.

Criminal Homicide-Murder and Non-negligent Manslaughter:  The willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by another.

Robbery:

The taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody, or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear.

Aggravated Assault:

A person who assaults an individual without a weapon and inflicts serious or aggravated injury upon that individual without intending to commit murder or to inflict great bodily harm less than murder.

Felonious Assault:

A person who assaults another person with a gun, revolver, pistol, knife, iron bar, club, brass knuckles, or other dangerous weapon without intending to commit murder or to inflict great bodily harm less than murder.

Assault with Intent to do Great Bodily Harm Less Than Murder:

Any person who shall assault another with the intent to do great bodily harm less than the crime of murder.

Domestic Violence:

A felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed by:

 

  • A current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim
  • A person with whom the victim shares a child in common
  • A person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner
  • A person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction receiving grant monies under the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA)
  • Any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s act under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction

 

Dating Violence:

 

Violence committed by a person:

 

  • Who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim; and
  • Where the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the consideration of the following factors:
    • The length of the relationship
    • The type of relationship; and
    • The frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship

 

Stalking:

 

Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to:

 

  • Fear for his or her safety or the safety of others; or
  • Suffer substantial emotional distress

Burglary:

The unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or a theft. For reporting purposes this definition includes: unlawful entry with intent to commit a larceny or felony; breaking and entering with the intent to commit a larceny; housebreaking; safecracking; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned.

Motor Vehicle Theft:

The theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle. (Classify as motor vehicle theft all cases where automobiles are taken by persons not having lawful access even though the vehicles are later abandoned; including joyriding.)

Weapon Law Violations:

The violation of laws or ordinances dealing with weapon offenses, regulatory in nature, such as: manufacture, sale, or possession of deadly weapons; carrying deadly weapons, concealed or openly; furnishing deadly weapons to minors; aliens possessing deadly weapons; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned.

Drug Abuse Violations:

Violations of State and local laws relating to the unlawful possession, sale, use, growing, manufacturing, and making of narcotic drugs. The relevant substances include: opium or cocaine and their derivatives (morphine, heroin, codeine); marijuana; synthetic narcotics (Demerol, methadone’s); and dangerous non-narcotic drugs (barbiturates, Benzedrine).

 

 

Liquor Law Violations:

The violation of laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, transporting, furnishing, possessing of intoxicating liquor; maintaining unlawful drinking places; bootlegging; operating a still; furnishing liquor to a minor or intemperate person; using a vehicle for illegal transportation of liquor; drinking on a train or public conveyance; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned. (Drunkenness and driving under the influence are not included in this definition.)

Hate Crimes

A hate crime is a criminal offense committed against a person or property which is motivated, in whole or in part, by the offender’s bias. Bias is a performed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons based on their race, gender, religion, disability, sexual orientation or ethnicity/ national origin.

Six Categories are reported:

Race. A preformed negative attitude toward a group of persons who possess a common physical characteristics (e.g. color of skin, eyes, and/or hair; facial features, etc.) genetically transmitted by descent and heredity, which distinguish them as a distinct division of humankind (e.g. Asians, blacks, whites).

Gender. A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons because those persons are male or female.

Religion. A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons who share the same religious beliefs regarding the origin and purpose of the universe and the existence or nonexistence of a supreme being (e.g. Catholics, Jews, Protestants, atheists).

Sexual Orientation. A preformed negative opinion toward a group of persons based on their sexual attraction ward and responsiveness to, members of their won sex or members of the opposite sex (e.g. gays, lesbians, heterosexuals).

Ethnicity/ National Origin. A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons of the same race or national origin who share common or similar traits, languages, customs and traditions (e.g. Arabs, Hispanics).

Disability. A preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons based on their physical or mental impairments/challenges, whether such disability is temporary or permanent, congenital or acquired by heredity, accident, injury, advanced age or illness.

 

Categories of Hate Crime Offenses

Group A

 

Murder and Non-negligent manslaughter

Forcible sex offenses

Non-forcible sex offenses

Robbery

Aggravated assault

Burglary

Motor vehicle theft

Arson

 

 

Group B

 

Larceny-theft

Simple Assault

Intimidation

Destruction/damage/vandalism of property

 

Group B offenses (larceny-theft, simple assault, intimidation, and destruction/damage/vandalism of property, should only be included in your Clery statistics if they are hate crimes.

  1. Larceny-Theft is the unlawful taking, carrying, leading, or riding away of property from the possession or constructive possession of another. (Larceny and theft mean the same thing in the UCR.) Constructive possession is the condition in which a person does not have physical custody or possession, but is in a position to exercise dominion or control over a thing.

Classify as Larceny:

  • Thefts of bicycles or automobile accessories
  • Shoplifting
  • Pocket-picking
  • The sealing of any property or article which is not taken by force and violence or by fraud
  • Any of the above regardless of the value of the item or items taken. ( For example, include the unlawful taking of a parking sticker that has been peeled off a car windshield.)

Do not classify as Larceny:

  • Motor vehicle theft
  • Attempted motor vehicle theft
  • Embezzlement
  • Confidence games
  • Forgery
  • Worthless checks
  1. Simple Assault is an unlawful physical attack by one person upon another where neither the offender displays a weapon nor the victim suffers obvious severe or aggravated bodily injury involving apparent broken bones, loss of teeth, possible internal injury, severe laceration, or loss of consciousness.
  2. Intimidation is to unlawfully place another person in reasonable fear of bodily harm through the use of threatening words and/or other conduct, but without displaying a weapon or subjecting the victim to actual physical attack.
  3. Destruction/ Damage/ Vandalism of Property is to willfully or maliciously destroy, damage, deface or otherwise injure real or personal property without the consent of the owner or the person having custody or control of it.

Classify as Destruction/ Damage/ Vandalism of property:

  • Cutting auto tires
  • Drawing obscene pictures on restroom walls
  • Smashing windows
  • Destroying school records
  • Defacing library books

NORTHERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY ATHLETIC CODE

3.18 Intercollegiate Athletics and U.S. Olympic Training Site Student-Athlete Code

3.18.1   Philosophy

It is a privilege for a Northern Michigan University student to participate in intercollegiate athletics or the U.S. Olympic Training Site.  Student-athletes represent the University; therefore, their behavior is expected to reflect high standards on all levels:  social, academic and athletic.

3.18.2   Purpose

01.       To outline a process to evaluate unacceptable student-athlete behavior; and

02.       To allow for the imposition of disciplinary action against a student-athlete whose behavior is unacceptable.

3.18.3   Definitions

01.       The Student-Athlete Code Violation Review Committee will consist of the Director of Athletics, the Director of Public Safety, and the Dean of Students and Student Services, or their designee(s).

02.       Criminal Activity is defined as Felony level offenses; or serious Misdemeanor level offenses which include, but are not limited to, criminal activity that involves violence, assaultive behavior, stalking behavior, sexual harassment, and alcohol or other drug offenses.

.03       Student-athletes as defined in this document refers to those students participating in intercollegiate athletics (per NCAA squad list) or the U.S. Olympic Training Site at Northern Michigan University.

.04       Team activities are defined as association with other team members for the purposes of furthering the interests of the team, including, but not limited to, team practices and/or competition, team travel, team meetings, or participation in the recruitment of student-athletes.

3.18.4   Scope

Student-athletes whose behavior does not comport with the acceptable standards expected of Northern Michigan University student-athletes will be subject to review by the Student-Athlete Code Violation Review Committee.

.01       All student-athletes will be given a copy of the Intercollegiate Athletics and U.S. Olympic Training Site Student-Athlete Code (hereinafter, “Student-Athlete Code”).

.02       All student-athletes will be required to acknowledge that they are under obligation, as a condition of their participation in intercollegiate athletics or U.S. Olympic Training Site at Northern Michigan University, to immediately self-report any violations of the Student-Athlete Code to their coach or the Director of Athletics.  Failure to self-report any violations of the Student-Athlete Code may subject the student-athlete to additional disciplinary action by the Student-Athlete Code Violation Review Committee.

03.       Any action taken pursuant to the Student-Athlete Code will be considered separate and distinct from any action that may be taken by the Dean of Students Office, other administrative action taken by the University (including, but not limited to, action taken under the Northern Michigan University Student-Athlete Drug Education and Testing Policy), or any other action taken by law enforcement or criminal justice agencies against a student-athlete.

04.       All student-athletes will be subject to review under the Student-Athlete Code if the student-athlete:

  • Is in violation of Northern Michigan University’s Student Code;
  • Is in violation of the Northern Michigan University Student-Athlete Drug Education and Testing Policy;
  • Is suspended from team activities by their coach for violating team rules; and/or
  • Has committed criminal activity that consists of an act or acts prohibited under municipal, state, or federal law as defined in this document.

3.18.5   Procedures

.01       The Student-Athlete Code Violation Review Committee will either confer or hold a meeting to review and investigate all alleged violations of this code.

.02       Coaches shall notify the Director of Athletics of all alleged violations of the Student-Athlete Code upon becoming aware of the alleged violation.

.03       The Student-Athlete Code Violation Review Committee should receive input from the coach or any other party who has relevant information that is pertinent to the alleged violation of the Student-Athlete Code.

.04       The Student-Athlete Code Violation Review Committee shall determine, based upon the seriousness of the alleged violation, whether a student-athlete will be suspended from team activities pending the resolution of the alleged violation.

.05       The Student-Athlete Code Violation Review Committee shall determine the disciplinary action or penalty to be imposed on the student-athlete, including, but not limited to:  (1) permanent or limited suspension from team activities; and/or (2) partial or permanent revocation of athletic scholarships.

.06       In the event the Student-Athlete Code Violation Review Committee cannot reach consensus as to what action to take on an alleged violation of the Student-Athlete Code, the matter will be referred to the Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Services to determine what action, if any, should be taken against the student-athlete.

.07       The Dean of Students and Student Services shall provide notice of disciplinary action taken by the Student-Athlete Code Violation Review Committee to the Director of Athletics, the Director of Public Safety, the Associate AD for Compliance, the student-athlete’s coach, and the student-athlete.  The Director of Athletics will be available to the Athletic Council to provide a briefing on the action(s) taken by the committee.

.08       Student-athletes may appeal disciplinary action taken by the Student-Athlete Code Violation Review Committee within 72 hours to the Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Services, or to the President.

STUDENT CONDUCT PROCESS

Introduction

Students make many decisions regarding their behavior and these decisions must not conflict with the University’s expected standards of behavior.  However, when a student violates those standards, then an appropriate sanction must be imposed by way of a student conduct process.  The student conduct process and any resultant action services to assist the student in recognizing and correcting behavior that is incompatible with the norms of the University community, and hopefully to deter others from making inappropriate decisions.  When a student’s action demonstrates that basic standards of behavior have not been met or that the best interests of the student and the University cannot be served by the student’s continued enrollment, the University is obligated to separate the student from the University community.

The responsibility for resolving alleged violations of the Student Code of Northern Michigan University is delegated by the Board of Trustees to the President, who delegates it to the Vice President for Enrollment and Student Services.  It is then delegated to the Dean of Students or designee and members of the conduct board.  In order to fulfill this responsibility, the student conduct process is designed to meet essential standards of reasonableness and fairness.

Therefore, procedural requirements of due process as outlined in the following sections have been established to ensure that every student receives equitable and judicious treatment if charged with a violation of the Student Code.  Conduct boards serve to provide the student charged with a hearing by impartial persons if the student denies the charges.  However, it should be clearly understood that they do not sit as courts of law and are not restricted by legal rules of evidence and procedure, since they hold administrative hearings which allow flexibility and the reasonable use of discretion.

The student conduct process described herein governs the implementation of the process for adjudicating alleged violations of the Student Code.  Any questions regarding the student conduct process, the Student Code, or any aspect of the Student Conduct Program, should be referred to the Dean of Students Office.

Description of an Incident

Any member of the University community may file charges against a student for violations of the Student Code.  A description of an incident shall be prepared in writing.  The report should contain the name of the student accused of the violation, a detailed description of the behavior that violated the Student Code, and the name and contact information of the University community member writing the report.  Any report should be submitted as soon as possible after the event takes place, and within one calendar year of the date of the incident.  Exceptions to the calendar year deadline will be considered by the Dean of Students or designee.

A description of an incident pertaining to a situation which occurred in the residence halls, University apartments or adjacent areas should be submitted to a residence life staff member.  All other situations should be submitted to the Dean of Students Office.  Once a description of an incident is received, it will be determined through the student conduct process whether the alleged violation occurred.

Complaint is Adjudicated

.01       The accused student will receive, in writing, a list of one or more sections of the Student Code alleged to have been violated and a brief description of the alleged violation(s).  Such a notice will be considered received by the student if it is delivered in person, by mail or by NMU email.

.02       The accused student will receive, in writing, the date, time, and location of an administrative hearing with a conduct administrator to discuss the incident.  The accused student shall be notified in writing 48 hours prior to the scheduled administrative hearing.  Such notice will be considered received by the student if it is delivered in person, by mail, or by NMU email.  The accused student may voluntarily waive the 48 hours and request to meet sooner with the conduct administrator at his/her earliest convenience.

.03       during the administrative hearing, the accused student will be advised of the information and/or evidence against him/her and given an opportunity to be heard in his/her own defense.

.04       The accused student may accept responsibility for the alleged violation(s) and a sanction will be issued.  Sanctions shall be selected from those stated in Section 2.7.1 of the Student Code.  It is at the discretion of the administrator who conducts the administrative hearing to combine sanctions for multiple violations, and review the student’s past violations of the Student Code, if any, and academic progress; and to interview University employees having knowledge of the accused student so that appropriate sanctions and special conditions may be selected.  The student will receive a copy of the sanction in writing electronically by NMU email or hard copy.

.05.      The accused student may deny responsibility for the alleged violation(s) or stand mute, in which case the conduct administrator shall refer the case to one of the conduct boards.

Conduct Board Hearing Procedures

.01       The conduct board hearing shall begin with a reading of the Specification of Charges by the chairperson.  The information pertaining to the charges shall be presented and considered even if the accused student or complainant is not present.  The accused student shall respond to the matters contained in the charges by affirming, denying, or standing mute to each items as it is read.

.02       If the accused student affirms the truth and accuracy of all items in the Specification of Charges, then the conduct board will:

·Note the affirmative plea after each item is presented in the Specification of Charges.

·Hear any information in mitigation of the Student Code violation(s) that will enable the conduct board to select an appropriate sanction.

·Decide upon any appropriate sanction(s) provided in the Student Code.

·Return the Specification of Charges to the Dean of Students Office with a notation of the pleas, conduct board decision(s), and a statement of the sanction imposed.  The sanction letter shall be signed by the chairperson of the conduct board.

.03       If the accused student denies the truth or accuracy of any part of the Specification of Charges, or stands mute, the hearing shall proceed in the following manner:

·The complainant or support person (see 2.4.5.09) and witnesses who support the complaint shall be called individually to share information with, and shall then be questioned by, the conduct board.

·The accused student or support person shall present his/her response by sharing information with the conduct board, answering questions from the conduct board, and then calling witnesses, if any, capable of sharing information related to the incident on the accused student’s behalf.  These witnesses may also be questioned by the conduct board.

·The accused student or his/her support person and witnesses for the accused student shall have the right to question the complainant and the complainant’s witnesses and to examine information presented in connection with the incident.  The complainant or his/her support person and witnesses shall have the right to question the accused student and the accused student’s witnesses and to examine information presented in connection with the incident.  All questions shall be directed to the chairperson for the hearing.  All questions must be relevant to the case being decided, and relevancy shall be decided by the chairperson or advisor of the conduct board.

·Summary statements are permissible at the close of all questioning by all of the involved parties and shall be directed to the conduct board.  Any further questions from the conduct board shall then be asked.

·After the fact-finding portion of the hearing is concluded, the conduct board shall go into closed session with only the advisor(s) present.

·Decision:  The truthfulness of each factual allegation appearing in the Specifications of Charges shall be termed a “question of fact” for the purposes of the student conduct process.  After resolving all questions of fact, the conduct board shall decide whether each item and charge of the Specifications of Charges has been established by a preponderance of the evidence; that it is more likely than not that the accused student violated the Student Code.

·If the conduct board finds that the items affirmed are sufficient to constitute any violation, they shall assess a sanction(s) provided in the Student Code.  It is at the discretion of the conduct board to combine sanctions for multiple violations and to review the student’s past violations of the Student Code, if any and academic progress, and to interview University employees having knowledge of the accused student so that appropriate sanctions and special conditions may be selected.

Rules of Procedure in the Conduct Process

This section does not apply to cases on appeal.

The rules provided in the student conduct process shall apply to administrative hearings and conduct board hearings.  The Dean of Students or designee shall establish the procedures to be followed in the hearings.

.01       The accused student and complainant shall be entitled to a hearing by impartial persons.

.02       Requests to postpone a scheduled hearing due to extenuating circumstances, by the accused student or complainant, must be made in writing to the Dean of Students or designee at least 24 hours in advance of the hearing.  That person may approve or deny the request based on verification of extenuating circumstances.  Hearings will not be postponed due to scheduling conflicts of witnesses, support persons, or attorneys.  In cases in which an examination period or break period interferes, such hearings will be held as soon as possible when classes are again in session.

.03       On rare occasions, the conduct board may accommodate concerns for the personal wellbeing, and/or fears of confrontation of the complainant, accused student, and/.or other witnesses during the hearing by providing separate facilities, by using a visual screen, and/or permitting participation by telephone, videophone, closed circuit television, video conferencing, videotape, audio tape, written statement, or other means, as determined appropriate by the Dean of Students or designee.

.04       A member of the Dean of Students’ staff shall be present at conduct board hearings as a procedural adviser.  The adviser shall not participate in the fact-finding portion of the hearing except to ensure that established procedures are followed and to rule on the relevancy of any line of questioning.  If the Specification of Charges is affirmed by the conduct board, the adviser may contribute pertinent information in the sanction assessment stage.  Pertinent information may include past violations of the Student Code, if any, and academic progress.  The adviser may also be interviewed by the conduct board if there is any particular knowledge to be given that may assist the conduct board in assessing a sanction or selecting a special condition.  After the decisions of the conduct board have been made, the Dean of Students Office will maintain records and be responsible for all communication pertaining to the case.

.05       The accused student and complainant shall be entitled to be present at the hearing during the consideration of any matters on which a decision to affirm or deny any item or charge on the Specification of Charges may be based.  This excludes private deliberation by the conduct board.

.06       The accused student and complainant shall be entitled to present his/her case through statements, questions, witnesses, and other forms of information.  The complainant and accused student shall provide the Dean of Students or designee with a written list of witnesses at least 24 hours in advance of the hearing.  It is the responsibility of the complainant and the accused student to identify witnesses and ensure their presence at the hearing.  Witnesses must have relevant information regarding pending charges against the student.

.07       Pertinent records, exhibits, and written statements (including impact statements) may be accepted as information for consideration by a conduct board at the discretion of the chairperson.  Records and documents that will be considered during a hearing will be made available to the conduct board but may be edited to protect the privacy rights of individuals not directly involved in the process.  Records and documents that will be considered during a hearing will be made available for review by the accused student and the complainant at their request prior to or during the hearing.

.08       Witnesses may be kept in separate areas prior to and during the hearing.  The witnesses shall remain in the hearing room after they have shared their information with the conduct board.  Names of all witnesses shall be available upon request to the conduct board, accused student, and complainant prior to the hearing.

.09       The accused student and complainant shall be entitled to be accompanied by a support person of his/her own choice; a support person shall be a member of faculty, staff, or student body of the University.  A support person shall not be a licensed or practicing attorney.  A support personal shall be allowed to ask questions for and to speak for the person(s) represented; however, the conduct administrator or members of the conduct board may question the accused student and complainant directly, and the accused student and complainant shall answer directly to the conduct administrator or conduct board.  If more than one student is charged in connection with the same situation or occurrence, then a support person for one such student cannot be another student who is charged.  In addition, anyone acting as a witness in a case may not act as a support person for another in the same case.

.10       The student charged may refuse to answer questions.  Other witnesses shall be required to answer all questions asked of them unless their answers would tend to incriminate them under any provision of the Student Code.

.11       All hearings are closed to the public.  Persons in attendance at hearings shall be limited to:

·the members of the conduct board and adviser(s);

·the accused student, complainant and their support person(s);

·witnesses, and

·individuals who are authorized to attend by the chairperson or the advisor to the conduct board.

.12       Admission or removal of any person to or from the hearing shall be at the discretion of the student conduct administrator, chairperson, and/or adviser to the conduct board.

.13       When a student is accused of violating the Student Code, and criminal charges are pending against the student, an attorney may be present at the student’s expense.  When this is the case, the role of the attorney is limited and passive.  He/she cannot actively participate in the hearing or ask questions.  His/her role is to advise the student regarding self-incrimination and to observe the proceedings.  All communication regarding the student conduct process will be directed to the student.

.14       Disciplinary proceedings involving a student charged with conduct that potentially violates both the criminal law and the Student Code will proceed without regard to pending civil or criminal litigation in court or criminal arrest and prosecution.  Proceedings under this Student Code may be carried out prior to, simultaneously with, or following civil or criminal proceedings off campus at the discretion of the Dean of Students or designee.  Determinations made or sanctions imposed under this Student Code shall not be subject to change because criminal charges arising out of the same facts giving rise to the violation of University rules were dismissed, reduced, or resolved in favor or against the student.

.15       Formal rules of process, procedure, and/or technical rules of evidence, such as are applied in criminal and civil court, are not used in student conduct proceedings.

.16       There shall be a single verbatim record, such as audio recording, of all hearings before a conduct board conducted only by the University.  Deliberations shall not be recorded.  The record shall be the property of the University.  The University may require that the record remain in its custody; provided, however, that the accused student and complainant have access to the record for all purposes relating directly to any appeals within the University.

.17       Conduct board hearings will proceed regardless of the failure of a student charged or complainant to appear.  In all cases, the information in support of the charges shall be considered.

.18       The conduct board or conduct administrator has the right to amend any item on the Specification of Charges for purposes of clarification or consistency, so long as such amendment will not have the effect of adding any substantive allegation to the Specification of Charges.  Students are informed of any amendments and amendments are noted in the conduct file.

.19       Decisions of the conduct board to affirm or deny any particular item or charge on the Specification of Charges shall be made on the basis of matters considered at the conduct board hearing.

.20       The conduct board’s standard of proof is preponderance of the evidence.  The conduct board shall decide, by majority vote, whether the evidence shows that it is more likely than not that the accused student violated the Student Code.

.21       If the accused student is found responsible for the charge(s), then he/she shall be entitled to written notice of the findings of the hearing.  If the accused student is found not responsible for the charge(s), then related documents and records will not remain part of the student’s official conduct record.

.22       The accused student and complainant have the right to appeal any decision of a conduct board (based on error of procedure or fact) or to request leniency of a penalty.  Should such and appeal or request for leniency be made, any sanction issued by the conduct administrator or conduct board shall be held in abeyance until acted upon by the appropriate appeal board or reviewing official.

.23       Hearings involving more than one accused student for the same incident may be conducted either separately or jointly.  When two or more students are charged and their cases are being heard together, the proceedings shall be the same except that the conduct board shall not seclude themselves and make a decision on any of the accused students until they have heard from all students involved in the case.

.24       Cases involving the imposition of sanctions other than suspension held in abeyance, suspension, expulsion, or revocation or withhold of degree shall be expunged from the student’s conduct record seven years after the final disposition of the case.

The Structure of the Conduct Board

Membership

.01       Students:  A pool of up to 20 student members of the conduct board may be comprised of both undergraduate and graduate students.  The membership shall include representation from on-campus and off-campus residents.

·Student members shall be selected through an interview process in which current members of the conduct board and the adviser participate.

·Student members shall be appointed.

·Student members shall have attained at least twelve hours of academic credit at the time of their appointment and must maintain at least a cumulative GPA of 2.00 and be free of any active sanctions imposed through the University’s student conduct process.

·Appointed student members must maintain sufficient attendance and satisfactory performance at training and hearings.

·Members may be removed at the discretion of the adviser of the conduct board for not meeting eligibility requirements.

.02       Faculty:              A pool of up to six members of the faculty appointed by the Provost.  Members may not be licensed attorneys.  Members shall serve for a period of three years provided they retain eligibility.  Faculty members may be recalled only following impeachment proceedings carried out by the organization which appointed them, the AAUP, where good case for removal is determined by resolution of the AAUP.

.03       Staff:  A pool of up to six members of the administration appointed by the Vice President for Enrollment and Student Services.  Members may not be licensed attorneys.  Administrative staff members may be terminated by the Associate Provost for Student Services & Enrollment for poor attendance or performance at hearings.

.04       Adviser:  The Dean of Students shall appoint a member of the Dean of Students Office who shall advise the conduct board in carrying out its responsibilities.

Quorum

A maximum of eight members of the conduct board may hear a case, and five members shall constitute a quorum.  The accused student shall have the right to waive the quorum requirement.  If a quorum cannot be obtained and is not waived, then the hearing shall be rescheduled.

Chairpersons

At the beginning of the academic year, the adviser for the conduct board shall select from among its members three co-persons.  These three people shall alternate as chair throughout the year, but may be called upon to serve as chair as needed.  Chairpersons shall vote only in the case of a tie.  The Chairperson of the conduct board shall have the authority to direct the hearing, call recesses, postpone hearings, take appropriate steps to maintain order at the hearings, decide questions of relevancy of evidence or information, recall witnesses or call such further witnesses as would seem able to aid in the resolution of matters relevant to the hearing, monitor the presentation of questions to witnesses by members of the conduct board, and decide who is permitted to attend the hear.

Jurisdiction

Conduct boards consisting of all student members may hear cases involving University regulations except those which may result in suspension or expulsion.  Conduct boards consisting of all students may impose only the following sanctions:  warning probation, disciplinary probation, special conditions, guardian notification for alcohol and other drugs, and loss of privileges.  Conduct boards consisting of students, faculty and staff may hear cases involving all University regulations including those which may result in suspension or expulsion.  Conduct Boards consisting of students, faculty, and staff may impose any of the sanctions defined in Section 2.7.1 of the Student Conduct Code.

Referral of Cases

A conduct board consisting of all students may waive jurisdiction over cases and refer them to a conduct board consisting of students, faculty, and staff provided there are reasonable grounds for such referral, that such action is taken prior to the conclusion of a formal hearing of the case, and that the advisor concurs.

Voting

A simple majority vote of the conduct board members present at any hearing shall be necessary and sufficient for action.  The chairperson votes only in the case of a tie.

Standard of Proof

The conduct board’s standard of proof is preponderance of the evidence.  The conduct board shall decide whether the evidence shows that is more likely than not that the accused student violated the Student Code.

Summer Sessions (nonacademic year)

An interim conduct board shall be established by the Dean of Students or designee to resolve Student Code charges during the period between the winter and fall semesters.  This conduct board shall be composed of faculty, staff, and continuing or enrolled students.

 Appeals

The accused student, the complainant, the Dean of Students or designee may submit an appeal.  It is optional for the accused student, the complainant, or the Dean of Students or designee, to submit a response to the appeal.

Appeals based on questions of fact and/or questions of procedure may be appealed to an appeal board. Appeals to request leniency of sanction may be appealed to the Vice President for Enrollment and Student Services.

A written appeal letter must be submitted to the Dean of Students or designee within 48 hours after the sanction is imposed.  An appeal letter must meet two conditions:  (1) it must cite the basis of the appeal; and (2) it must provide sufficient and detailed information to support the appeal.  The appeal will not be considered if both of these conditions are not met.  The body hearing the appeal shall determine if the appeal meets both conditions.

The appeal process shall be limited to a review of the file and supporting documents (except as necessary to gain insight into any new evidence).  The following are the ONLY accepted bases for appeal:

1.         Procedure:  To determine whether the original hearing was conducted in conformity with prescribed procedures.  Questions of procedure are limited to those which may have significantly affected the outcome of the hearing.  The person appealing must specify which procedures were not followed and how it significantly affected the outcome of the hearing.

2.         Fact:  To consider new information, sufficient to alter a decision or other relevant facts not brought out in the original hearing, because the person appealing did not know such information and/or facts at the time of the original hearing.  Information which was known to the person appealing at the time of the original hearing but was withheld will not be considered upon appeal.

3.         Leniency:  To determine whether the sanction imposed was appropriate for the violation of the Student Code that the student found was found to have committed, considering any previous violations.  The person appealing must specify why the sanction imposed is too harsh.

Procedure for Leniency Appeals

.01       Once an appeal is submitted and determined that it meets the appeal condition, the Vice President for Enrollment and Student Services or designee may:

·Modify the sanction (enhance or lesson);

·Uphold the sanction

·In extenuating circumstances (conflict of interest, absence of the appeal officer, etc.) request the President to appoint a hearing agent who shall consider the sanction and render a decision.  The hearing agent must be University faculty or staff.

.02       The Vice President for Enrollment and Student Services shall inform the accused student and the Dean of Students or designee in writing as to the decision within ten business days.

Procedure or Facts Appeals

.01       Jurisdiction:  The appeal committee shall have appellate jurisdiction over all conduct board decisions regarding findings of fact and questions of procedure.  The committee shall also review all other matters referred by the Dean of Students or designee.

.02       Membership:  The members of the appeal committee shall number three, and shall consist of one student selected from the active student members of the conduct board, one member of the faculty appointed by the Provost, and one member of the staff appointed by the Vice President for Enrollment and Student Services.  The members selected shall not have served on the conduct board for which the decision is being appealed.  Members may not be licensed attorneys.  If possible, all nominees should possess experience on a University conduct board.  Members shall serve for a period of three years provided the retain eligibility.  Members may be reappointed by following the same procedure.  A chairperson shall be selected by the members of the appeal committee.

.03       Procedure:

a.   Once an appeal is submitted and determined that it meets the appeal conditions, the appeal committee shall then request from the adviser of the conduct board whose decision is appealed a copy of the Specification of Charges and all information upon which the previous decision was made.  Three members of the appeal committee (one student, one staff, and one faculty member) must be present for the appeal to proceed and all decisions shall be based on a simple majority vote.

b.   If an error in fact or procedure occurred, then the case shall be sent back to the Dean of Students or designee who shall have the discretion to drop the charges or schedule a rehearing by the conduct board which made the original decision.

c.   The appeal committee chairperson shall inform the accused student and the Dean of Students or designee in writing as to the decision within ten business days.

Sanctions

Sanctions may be imposed upon any student found to be responsible for violation of the Student Code.  Sanctions may be used independently or in combination depending on the particular circumstance of the violation. Severe and/or multiple violations will increase the severity of sanctions applied.  Continue violations of the Student Code will result in more severe disciplinary sanctions.

No sanction shall become effective until it is imposed by the Dean of Students or designee.  Sanctions shall be ordered into execution 48 hours after the student has received written notice of the decision of the conduct board or conduct administrator; or immediately after action by the appeal committee or appeal officer designated to consider leniency of the sanction.  Written notice is considered received once delivered in person, by mail, or NMU email.

.01       Warning Probation:  a sanction imposed for a specific period of time.  Further violation of the Student Code will result in more severe disciplinary sanctions.

.02       Disciplinary Probation:  a sanction imposed for a specific period of time.  Further violations of the Student Code  may result in suspension or expulsion.

.03       Special Conditions:  Financial restitution, service to the University, service to the community, attendance at educational seminars, classes, or workshops, written assignments, or other activities deemed appropriate.  Some seminars, classes, and workshops may require a registration fee to be paid by the student.

.04       Parental/Guardian Notice for Alcohol and/or Other Drugs:  Parental or guardian notification for serious fist offenses, second offenses and any subsequent offenses for students under 21 years of age.

.05       Loss of Privileges:  Denial of specified privileges for a designated period of time.  Privileges that can be denied include, but are not limited to, contact with another person, campus registration of a vehicle, on-campus employment, access to a building or portion of a building, access to a program, access to the University network, participation in extracurricular activities, and any other privilege deemed appropriate.

.06       Suspension:  A decision of suspension terminates a student’s status as an enrolled student for a specific period of time and prohibits the student from attending classes.  A suspended student may not enter onto any part of campus without specific authorization from the Director of Public Safety and Police Services or designee and the Dean of Students or designee.  Students who reside on campus must remove their belongings from their place of residence within 48 hours of notice of suspension.

·The terms of suspension may also include other conditions which may apply following a student’s reinstatement.

·At the discretion of the conduct board or conduct administrator who hears the case, the suspension may be held in abeyance.

·A violation of the terms of suspension in abeyance may result in an extension of the period of suspension, which may be imposed by the Dean of students or designee.

.07       Temporary Suspension:  In certain circumstances, the Dean of Students or designee may impose             temporary suspension until the student conduct process is completed.

a.   Temporary suspension may be imposed only to promote the safety and wellbeing of members of the University community or preservation of property; to ensure the student’s own physical or emotional safety and wellbeing; or if the accused student poses an ongoing threat of disruption of, or interference with, the normal operations of the University.

b.   During the temporary suspension, a student shall be denied access to University housing, to the campus (including classes), and/or all other university activities or privileges for which the student might otherwise be eligible, as the Dean of Students or designee may determine appropriate.

c.   The temporary suspension does not replace the regular student conduct process, up to and through a conduct board hearing, if required.

.08       Expulsion:  A decision of expulsion permanently terminates a student’s status as an enrolled student.  An expelled student may not enter onto any part of the campus without specific authorization from the Director of Public Safety and Police Services or designee and the Dean of Students or designee.  Students who reside on campus must remove their belongings from their place of residence with 48 hours of notice of expulsion.

ACCESS TO CAMPUS FACILITIES AND RESIDENCE HALLS

Access to campus buildings and grounds is a privilege extended to students, faculty, staff, and authorized guests. Except for residence halls, most campus facilities are open during weekday business hours. Individuals who wish to access University building or property during non-business hours or for special events should contact the appropriate department administrator, Conference and Event Services, or the Department of Public Safety and Police Services.

An automated card access control system is also installed in all academic and administrative buildings. University members with questions about the system should contact Public Safety and Police Services at 906-227-2151.

Resident Hall Access

Residence Hall Security Standards

Providing security in residence halls is an important responsibility of the staff of the Housing and Residence Life Office. The standards outlined below are intended to ensure the safety and security of students, staff, and property. In this effort, it is essential that all door and window hardware is in good working order, all staff aware of these standards, and staff reliably fulfill their responsibilities with regard to residence hall security.

Exterior door access for the University’s 10 residence halls and the Woodland Park apartments is controlled with CBORD’s CS Access™ an IP-based door access control technology tailored specifically for universities. This system allows Housing and Residence Life Office staff to manage exterior door access electronically.

Academic Year

Once a building has been secured, no one without authorization (on the student identification card) can enter, unless he or she is entering with and as a guest of a resident of the building or it can be verified that the student is a resident of the building who is not carrying his or her ID card. If the person's identity/residency of the building cannot be verified using information at the desk, it may be necessary for the student to call his or her roommate or a friend to come to the lobby to verify identification/residency. If this is not possible, the staff member may escort the student into the hall to his or her room to obtain identification. If the person's identification/residency cannot be verified he or she will be escorted to the lobby and, if necessary, Public Safety and Police Services will be contacted for assistance.

Students are repeatedly advised to lock their room door when they are out of the room or sleeping. With the exception of a maintenance person performing routine maintenance with permission to enter from the resident, room doors are not unlocked for anyone but the room resident(s) unless an emergency situation exists. Maintenance staff are directed to respect student’s privacy by knocking loudly, waiting for an answer to the knock, and announcing themselves at the door before entering. Room doors are to be locked immediately after the maintenance person has completed his or her task and left the room.

Similarly, each student room door is to be locked immediately after the room has been surveyed during a fire alarm or similar emergency situation.

Break Periods: Due to the decrease in traffic and staffing during break periods lobby, hall entrance doors, and room doors are locked. Lobby and entrance doors are locked automatically, while students are told to lock their room and bathroom doors. Staff, after they perform their routine maintenance inspections, make sure that all student room doors, except for those rooms that are occupied, are locked for breaks. During break periods, Housing and Residence Life staff make sure that doors and windows remain locked. It is a specific responsibility of break coverage staff (resident directors, building and grounds attendants, resident advisers, and security assistants) to check windows and doors during their rounds through the buildings.

If Housing and Residence Life staff contact a person who does not belong in the hall and refuses to identify him or herself prior to being escorted from the building, Public Safety and Police Services is contacted for assistance. If the person shows identification when requested, he or she will be escorted out of the building.  Both the supervising staff member and Public Safety and Police Services should be given the name, address, and phone number of the person and the basic details of the incident (e.g., from of identification, time and date, location, and explanation of why he or she was there) when an unauthorized person is contacted in the hall.

It is the responsibility of the resident director, working with the hall building and grounds attendant and other departmental staff as appropriate, to ensure that all door and window hardware are in good working condition.

Housing and Residence Life work diligently to provide a secure environment for residents while minimizing any inconveniences. Residents are encouraged to keep their room doors locked, keep exit doors secured, escort their guests at all times, and report any unusual circumstances to our resident hall staff or Public Safety and Police Services immediately.

Occupied Buildings. In general, the security measures described for the academic year will apply to the residence halls occupied during the summer: Doors are locked using the door access control system. Guests are issued temporary access cards, programmed for their group. Housing and residence Life staff and conference group supervisors are responsible for ensuring security.

Unoccupied Buildings. In buildings where no work or only minimal work is being done, all entrance doors and windows are closed and locked. On work days, especially in warm weather, it is expected that the room doors and windows in buildings being worked on will be open in order to remove paint and/or cleaning fluid fumes as well as to reduce the temperature in the buildings while staff are working.

It is important, however, that security is maintained by all departmental staff. They are to:

  1. Building entrance doors (including the door to the lobby) will be closed and locked at all times unless otherwise approved by supervisory staff.
  2. Windows will be closed and locked in areas where staff are working unless it is necessary to leave the open to facilitate paint drying, to vent cleaning fumes, or the staff will be returning to the area within a short period (e.g., breaks or 15-30 minute projects), and
  3. Staff will check all open rooms, close and lock all hall and lobby windows, and make sure all hall access doors are closed and locked at the end of the day. When possible, window blinds and room doors will be left open to facilitate Public Safety and Police Services and Housing and Residence Life staff security checks. If this is not possible, draperies should be closed and room doors locked.

University Property: University property (e.g., tools, cleaning equipment, pillows, and blankets) and property being rented by the University (e.g., sheets, pillows cases, and towels) will be securely stored in a designated room when not in use or under the supervision of a University staff member. Maintenance and storage rooms will be locked continuously unless staff members are working in them.

Communication with Students

At all first house and hall meetings Housing and Residence Life staff talk with students about safety and security:

  1. Always lock your room and bathroom door, even if you are just walking down the hall to visit a friend. The number one reason for residence hall room thefts is unlocked doors.
  2. You are encouraged to use the door viewer before opening your door, so that you are not surprised by an unexpected or unwanted visitor.
  3. Carry your keys and ID card with you at all times, and remember never lend them to anyone. It is illegal to duplicate one of NMU's residence hall keys.
  4. Join Operation ID when you move into your room. This fast, simple way to identifying your valuables is a very necessary step in identifying your valuables should they ever be stolen and subsequently recovered. See your resident adviser for information about this program.
  5. Don't leave valuables like your computer wallet, checkbook, or jewelry out in the open.
  6. Report all thefts, regardless of the value of the item(s) taken, to Public Safety and Police Services (phone 2151) immediately.
  7. Report any unfamiliar or suspicious looking people you see wandering around your hall to a staff member immediately.
  8. NMU's residence halls are locked in the evening for your safety. Please don't prop these doors open or let strangers into your hall. If you are visiting a friend after a hall is locked, arrange to meet him or her in the lobby or have them call you on the courtesy phone located near the lobby reception desk.
  9. If you receive threatening or obscene phone calls, hang up immediately. Report any such calls to Public Safety (2151) or a residence hall staff member immediately.

State Side Building Security

It is the policy of Northern Michigan University to allow students and non-University personnel access to University facilities only under the supervision of University employees. (Please note that students on the payroll of the University are considered employees and may have supervisory duties.)

It is recognized, however, that on occasion it may be necessary for students to use University facilities when supervision by a University employee is not possible.

Under these circumstances, the following guidelines are to be followed:

1.         All students using University facilities must:

a.   be under the supervision of a University employee or student monitor;

b.   have prior written approval from the instructor, supervisor, or advisor specifying the project which will be worked on and the hours they will be using the facility;

c.   have prior written approval from the unit or individual responsible for the facility, or area, if different from b,  above;

d.   have in their possession a copy of the written approval, to be shown to University employees, upon request;

e.   provide a copy of the written approval to the Public Safety Department and the unit or individual responsible for the facility, or area.

2.         Students are not to be given building keys or given unlimited access to any University building unless their University employment necessitates it, and they have prior written approval of the appropriate Department Head.

POLICY FOR MISSING PERSONS

Purpose

  • Establish a policy on the investigation of Missing Persons.
  • Applicability
  • All University students who reside in campus housing, including university operated apartments.
  • References

The purpose of this policy is to establish procedures for the university’s response to reports of missing students, as required by the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008.

  • Initiating Department/Division
  • Public Safety and Police Services
  • Housing and Residence Life
  • Dean of Students

Missing Student

This procedure applies to students who reside in campus housing, including university operated apartment units.

For purposes of this policy, a student may be considered to be a “missing person’ if the person’s absence is contrary to his/her usual pattern of behavior and unusual circumstances may have caused the absence. Such circumstances could include, but not be limited to, a report of suspicion that the missing person may be the victim of foul play, has expressed suicidal thoughts, is drug dependent, is in a life-threatening situation, or has been with persons who may endanger the student’s welfare.

1.         Procedures for designation of emergency contact information

a.   Students age 18 and above and emancipated minors

      Students will be given the opportunity during each semester registration process to designate an individual or individuals to be contacted by the university no more than 24 hours after the time that the student is determined to be missing in accordance with the procedures set forth below.

b.   Students under the age 18

      In the event a student who is not emancipated is determined to be missing pursuant to the procedures set forth below, the university is required to notify a custodial parent or guardian no more than 24 hours after the student is determined to be missing in accordance with procedures set forth below.

2.         Official notification procedures for missing persons

            a.   Any individual on campus who has information that a residential student may be a missing person must notify Public Safety and Police Services as soon as possible.

Note: In order to avoid jurisdictional conflicts when an off-campus and or commuter student is believed to be missing, the reporting person should immediately notify local law enforcement authorities. Public Safety and Police Services will assist external authorities with these investigations as requested.

  1.  
  2.  

3.         Campus communications about missing students

            In cases involving missing persons, law enforcement personnel are best situated to provide information to the media that is designed to elicit public assistance in the search for a missing person. Therefore, all communications regarding missing students will be handled by law enforcement authorities, who may consult with the Universities Communications Office. All inquiries to the university regarding missing students, or information provided to any individual at the university about a missing student, shall be referred to Public Safety and Police Services, who shall refer such inquiries and information to law enforcement authorities.

 

            Prior to providing the University community with any information about a missing student, the Communications Office shall consult with the Public Safety and Police Services.

Northern Michigan University Emergency Notification and Preparedness

I. Guidelines:

These guidelines establish the emergency response and evacuation procedures for Northern Michigan University. These guidelines have been established to ensure, to the greatest extent possible, the safety and welfare of students and employees. These guidelines are aligned with, and in compliance with the Higher Education Opportunity Act which requires all Title IV institutions, without exception, to have and disclose emergency response procedures in response to a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or employees occurring on the campus.

II. Scope:

The requirements set forth in these guidelines are only applicable to emergency or dangerous situations occurring on campus. The institution may issue emergency notifications about emergency or dangerous situations that occur in the broader community if university officials determine that such notifications provide helpful or relevant information to the campus population.

III. Situation:

Northern Michigan University will, upon confirmation of an ongoing significant emergency or dangerous situation that poses an imminent threat to the safety of campus community members, immediately issue emergency notifications to the campus community. While it is impossible to predict every significant or dangerous situation that may occur on campus, the following identified situations shall warrant an emergency notification after confirmation.

a.         Armed/Hostile Intruder

b.         Bomb/Explosives (Threat)

c.         Communicable disease outbreak

d.         Severe weather

e.         Terrorist incident

f.          Civil unrest

g.         Natural disaster

h.         Hazardous materials incident

i.          Structure fires

 

University officials shall use their best, reasonable judgment in all other situations as to whether or not an emergency notification is warranted.

 

Situations that may create business, academic, or research interruptions, but do not pose a health or safety risk, do not necessitate an emergency notification. Notifications about such situations will be facilitated by University Communications with coordination of involved departments as appropriate. Examples of such situations include:

 

Emergency Notification Policy

a.         Inclement weather closures

b.         Temporary building closures

c.         Power outages

 

An emergency notification will not be issued upon confirmation if the notification will:

a.         Compromise the efforts of first responders

b.         Compromise efforts to assist the victim

c.         Increase the vulnerability of campus safety

d.         Compromise efforts to contain the emergency

 

IV. Assumptions:

These guidelines were established with the following assumptions:

a.         Utilization of multiple notification methods is needed as no single notification method will reach everyone, everywhere, every time.

b.         100 percent delivery of notification to each member of the campus population cannot be guaranteed.

c.         Other information sources outside the institutions control may generate erroneous or conflicting information (i.e. unaffiliated social media sites, word of mouth).

d.         Regular testing of emergency notification systems is required to ensure proper functionality and proficiency.

e.         Notification systems must account for communication impairments.

f.          Several notifications are considered passive notifications requiring an action on the recipients’ part. Some recipients will not take this action and therefore not all recipients will receive notifications during the desired timeframe.

g.         The University text alert system is an “opt-in” system, and therefore not all campus population members have chosen to register.

h.         There is no mechanism to ensure that campus members that have registered for the Alert system are maintaining correct contact information

i.          Several notification methods rely on the functionality of third party vendors that are outside of the institution’s control (cell phone service providers, electricity).

V. Confirmation of an Emergency or Dangerous Situation:

Reports of emergency or dangerous situations can originate from various sources including;

*           Reports from first responders

*           Reports from established warning points

*           Reports from other campus departments

*           Reports from citizens through 9-1-1

 

Confirmation of these situations will occur through several different processes:

 

Criminal Nature:

Emergency or dangerous situations that are criminal in nature will be considered confirmed if a law enforcement officer observes the situation as it is occurring. For situations that are criminal in nature which are not apparent or not directly observed by law enforcement, confirmation will be made by University Police Command level staff. Command level staff will review the readily available information and determine if there is enough information to reasonably conclude a significant emergency or dangerous situation is occurring on campus. Command level staff may consult with additional departments and policy level personnel as practical without jeopardizing life safety.

 

Other Emergency or Dangerous Situations:

Confirmation of non-criminal situations will be determined after readily available information is reviewed by campus emergency management, law enforcement, or policy level personnel.

 

Established Warning Points:

Established warning points are considered individuals or departments with subject matter expertise on particular hazards that may affect campus. When a warning is issued by one of these individuals or departments, it is considered confirmed, however, additional consultation with campus officials will occur as practical without jeopardizing life safety.

  • National Weather Service Warnings for weather events, flood events, and wild land fire
  • Warnings for flash flood events
  • Marquette County Public Health Communicable disease/public health emergencies
  • Marquette City Fire Department Structure fire and hazardous material events

 

*This table is not all inclusive, but a sampling of established warning points.

 

VI. Population Notified/Segmented Notification:

With the exception of emergencies that are contained to one campus facility/area, the University has decided not to provide segmented emergency notifications. This decision was made based on the analysis of identified risks to the campus and to prevent accidental exclusion of a segment of campus population that the emergency notification was intended for.

 

VII. Emergency Notification Content:

The content of an emergency notification will depend on the situation and the notification method.

However, the following information will be included in all initial emergency notifications regardless of the situation or method:

*           A description of the situation (flash flood warning, dangerous situation, etc.)

*           Relevant safety instructions (move to higher ground, shelter in place, etc.)

 

A third element of where to get more information (i.e., university website) will be included in the initial notification if feasible. Because of text character limits, or the immediate availability of information, the third element of where to get information may not always be included in the initial emergency notification.

 

Pre-scripted Emergency Notifications

To the greatest extent possible, the university will develop and utilize pre-scripted emergency notifications that have been collaboratively developed and agreed upon by campus Law

Enforcement, campus Emergency Management, University Communications, and appropriate policy level personnel. The development of these notifications facilitates faster dissemination. Pre-scripted notifications have been developed primarily for the university text alert system, NMU’s website, the computer barge in program.

 

During situations for which a pre-scripted notification has not been developed, or when the responsible official determines different content is needed the guidelines listed above will be followed to craft these notifications.

 

Additional content considerations

As feasible, after the situation description, relevant instructions, and additional information sources are provided, the following content should be considered for inclusion:

*           Campus operating status (open, closed, etc.)

*           Information update frequencies

*           Additional instructions not specific to life safety

Notification at the conclusion of a significant emergency or dangerous situation

As deemed appropriate by the responsible university official, an “all clear” notification should be considered at the conclusion of a significant emergency or dangerous situation. These notifications should include campus operating status if relevant.

 

VIII. Concept of Operations:

The primary method of issuing an emergency notification is the university text alert system. The system is capable of sending text messages, and emails to registered users.

Registered users are responsible for maintaining correct contact information and for regularly checking registered devices and accounts. This is the primary alerting tool for campus-wide notification as it utilizes both “active” and “passive” alerting functions. The campus recognizes the need for public safety partners in the broader community to have situational awareness of emergencies that occur on campus, and as such, select members of the broader public safety community are registered to receive campus-wide text alerts.

 

University text alert notifications may be used in conjunction with other campus warning systems such as the NMU home page www.nmu.edu, the campus emergency computer barge in line, campus social media sites and local media sites.

 

The campus website is designed to accommodate increased traffic during emergency situations so that both campus community members and the broader community are provided with emergency notifications and information. The website will be the primary point of information dissemination for the broader community, including parents.

 

Initiation of Notification

 

Upon confirmation of a significant emergency or dangerous situation the following process to initiate an emergency notification will be used:

 

Decision Criteria for Emergency Notifications:

  1. Life Safety Considerations:

a.   What is the potential for injury or death?

b.   What is the potential for damage?

c.   What is the potential for interruptions to critical services?

2.         Situation:

a.   What is the impact to the campus?

b.   Is the situation stable, what is the potential for the situation to worsen?

c.   What is the urgency of the situation?

3.         Audience:

a.   Who needs to receive the notification?

4.         Limitations:

a.   Are there any known limitations of the notification systems?

 

Initial Emergency Notification Responsibilities:

Northern Michigan University Public Safety and Police Services is responsible for initiating all emergency notifications.

Command staff or their designees are responsible for contacting the university Identity, Brand and Marketing Department to initiate additional notification methods (NMU website, Social Media sites and Local Media sites).

 

Identity, Brand and Marketing

 

The Identity Brand and Marking Department is responsible for maintaining and disseminating emergency notifications that utilize:

*           The University website (www.nmu.edu)

*           Campus social media sites

*           Internal campus email systems

Campus emergency management or law enforcement is responsible for providing the necessary content to the Identity, Brand and Marketing Department.

Whenever possible, the department of Public Safety and Emergency Management staff will assume the responsibility of sending initial emergency notifications to allow police dispatch to focus on assignment of police and other first responders to the emergency, information gathering and dissemination to support officer safety and effective emergency response, and other duties. However, because campus dispatch often is the first campus entity to receive confirmation of a significant emergency or dangerous situation, at times police dispatch may need to initiate emergency notifications.

 

IX. Emergency Response Organization

 

The campus maintains an Emergency Operations Plan which outlines responsibilities of campus departments during emergencies. This plan outlines incident priorities, campus organization, and specific responsibilities of particular departments or positions.

University departments are responsible for developing emergency response and continuity of operations plans for their areas and staff. Campus emergency management provides resources and guidance for the development of these plans.

 

X. Emergency Response Education

 

Information about emergency response procedures is provided at the beginning of each semester at student orientation, and it is re-emphasized throughout the year on a campus-wide basis as other relevant advisories are issued, such as those posted at the start of the Winter season. Information on how to receive emergency notifications is also located in the campus closure policy, which is provided electronically to the entire campus community on an annual basis.

 

XI. Emergency Response Test Procedures

 

The University Text Alert system, NMU’s webpage, and campus emergency computer barge in line are tested twice a year, once prior to the fall semester, and once during the spring semester. During these scheduled test periods campus community members are encouraged to register for the text alert system and to become familiar with where emergency information can be found. These events are announced through internal campus e-mails, as well as local media outlets. In addition to the emergency notification system test the campus conducts table top exercises and participates in drills and exercises with community partners as opportunities to do so become available.

The residence halls conduct emergency evacuation drills each month during the academic school year. Other campus facilities are responsible for organizing and conducting their own emergency evacuation drills.

 

TIMELY WARNING NOTICES

 

Campus Safety Alerts

 

To help prevent crime or serious incidents, the Department of Public Safety and Police Services, in conjunction with other departments on campus, issues Campus Safety Alerts in a timely manner to notify community members about certain crimes in and around our community.  Members of the community who know of a crime or other serious incident should report that as soon as possible to the Department of Public Safety and Police Services so that a Campus Safety Alert can be issued if warranted.

If community members report crimes or serious incidents to other University administrators, those administrators will notify the Department of Public Safety and Police Services.  In these situations, the Director of Public Safety will make a decision, in consultation with other administrative personnel, whether to disclose the incident through a public notice.

 

NMU EMERGENCY ALERT

 

NMU ALERT is a means to notify the campus community of an imminent or ongoing threat to safety, security or health (all hazards) of students or employees on campus. Upon confirmation by University Police of an emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or staff, an alert notification the alert system will be disseminated without any delay with the goal of notifying as many people as possible, as rapidly as possible, taking into account the safety of the campus community. Examples of these include, but are not limited to, active shooter, tornado, and dangerous chemical release.

 

Dissemination of Alerts may include any or all of the following:

  • Mass Email
  • Text Message Alert
  • Web- www.nmu.edu
  • Local Media
  • Close Circuit Monitors
  • Computer Override

The university community should be prepared to take self-protection measures appropriate to the emergency, such as, but not limited to, shelter in place or evacuation, depending upon the circumstances or incident.

 

Emergency Evacuation Procedures

 

An evacuation drill is coordinated by the Office of Housing and Residence Life and the Public Safety department each month for all residential facilities.  Thus, the emergency response and evacuation procedures are tested monthly for dormitories and apartments.  Students learn the location of the emergency exits in the buildings and receive guidance about the direction they should travel when exiting each facility for a short-term building evacuation and guidance about where they should assemble. Public Safety and Police Services does not tell residents in advance about the designated locations for evacuations because those decisions are affected by time of day, location of the building being evacuated, the availability of the various designated emergency gathering locations on campus, and other factors such as the location and nature of the threat.

The purpose of these evacuation drills is to prepare building occupants for an organized evacuation in case of a fire or other emergency.  At NMU, evacuation drills are used as a way to educate and train occupants on fire-safety issues specific to their building.  During the drill, occupants “practice” drill procedures and familiarize themselves with the location of exits and the sound of the fire alarm.  The process also provides the University an opportunity to test the operation of fire alarm system components.  Evacuation drills are monitored by Public Safety and the University’s housing staff to evaluate egress and behavioral patterns.  Reports are prepared by participating departments that identify deficient equipment so that repairs can be made immediately.  Recommendations for improvements also are submitted to the appropriate departments/offices for consideration of its emergency response and evacuation procedures.

 

Shelter-in-place procedures: What it means to “shelter in place”

 

If an incident occurs and the building or areas around you become unstable, or if the air outdoors becomes dangerous due to toxic or irritating substances, it is usually safer to stay indoors, because leaving the area may expose you to that danger.  Thus, to ‘shelter in place” means to make a shelter of the building that you are in.  In a longer-term emergency, this location can be made even safer and more comfortable with a few adjustments until it is safe to go outside.

 

Basic “shelter-in-place” guidance

If an incident occurs and the building you are in is not damaged, stay in an interior room until you are told it is safe to exit.  If your building is damaged, take your personal belongings (purse, wallet, Wildcat Express Card, ID, etc…) and follow the evacuation procedures for your building (close your door, proceed to the nearest exit and use the stairs instead of the elevators).  After you have evacuated, seek shelter at the nearest University building quickly.  If police or fire department personnel are on the scene, follow their directions.

 

How you will know to “shelter in place”

A shelter-in-pace notification may come from several sources, including Public Safety and Police Services, housing staff members and other University employees utilizing the University’s emergency communications tools.

 

How to “shelter-in-place”

No matter where you are, the basic steps of “shelter in place” will generally remain the same.  Should the need ever arise; follow these steps, unless instructed otherwise by local emergency personnel:

  • If you are inside, stay where you are.  Collect any emergency shelter-in-place supplies and a telephone to be used in case of emergency.  If you are outdoors, proceed into the closest building quickly or follow instructions from emergency personnel on the scene.
  • Locate a room to shelter inside, It should be;
    • An Interior room
    • Above ground level
    • Without windows or with the least number of windows.  If there is a large group of people inside a particular building, several rooms may be necessary.
    • Close and lock all windows and close exterior doors
    • Turn off air conditioners, heaters and fans.
    • Close vents to ventilation systems are you are able.  (University staff will turn off the ventilation as quickly as possible).
    • Make a list of the people with you and ask someone (another faculty or staff member) to call and provide the list to Public Safety and Police Services so officers know where you are sheltering.  If only students are present, one of the students should call and provide the list.
    • Turn on a computer, radio, or TV and listen for further Instructions.
    • Make yourself comfortable.

 

Daily Activity Log

 

The Department of Public Safety and Police Services maintains a Daily Crime Log.  The Daily Crime Log is available for public inspection at the department’s office located at 102 Services Building or at http://www.nmu.edu/publicsafety/node/1.   The Daily Crime Log includes the nature, date, time and general location of each crime reported to the department as well as the disposition of the complaint, if this information is known at the time the log is created.  The department post specific incidents in the Daily Crime Log within two business days of receiving a report of an incident and reserves the right to exclude reports from the log in certain circumstances.

 

Blue Light Emergency Phones

 

NMU began a proactive program with the installation of “Code Blue” emergency telephones that provide two-way communications from the phone site direct to Public Safety Dispatch 911 emergency lines.  The purpose of the phone is for emergency contact to Public Safety allowing immediate response by patrols.  The phones are located strategically throughout campus at different locations with plans for future sites.  New installations are being completed during new construction projects.  Public Safety Officers physically inspect the emergency phones each week and report any malfunctions to telephone services for repair.

 

Public Safety Escort Service

 

The Department of Public Safety continues to provide escort service campus wide during the hours of darkness. Student lot guards, when on duty, provide this service; otherwise department Patrol Officers will make the transport when requested.

 

Security Surveys

 

Security surveys are conducted on a regular basis with members of the University community. The primary goal of these surveys is to identify areas of the campus that may present vulnerabilities to ones’ safety.  The department works with the appropriate facilities office to address concerns noted in the surveys.

 

Concealed Weapons Permit

 

If you are visiting campus with a weapon and have a CCW, you can register and store it at Public Safety and Police Services.

 

Residence Hall Fire Prevention Information

 

All the residence halls at Northern Michigan University are protected with a fire protection system. This system includes an approved fire suppression system, along with smoke detectors located in the common areas and individual rooms. These components are connected to the central fire alarm system located at Public Safety and Police Services and are monitored twenty four hours a day. The system also reports to three additional locations located in the building; the resident directors, resident advisors, and the main desk located in the lobby.

 

Fire drills: The department in conjunction with housing and residence life conducts monthly fire drills from each residence hall during the academic year. The university requires complete evacuation of buildings during a fire alarm. Individuals who ignore fire alarms and required evacuation may face disciplinary action.

 

Sex Offender Registration
 

Electronic Link to Sex Offender Information

In accordance to the “Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act” of 2000, which amends the Jacob Wetterling Crimes Against Children and Sexually Violent Offender Registration Act, Northern Michigan University Public Safety and Police Services is providing a link to the Michigan State Police Sex Offender Registry. This act requires institutions of higher education to issue a statement advising the campus community where law enforcement information provided by a State concerning registered sex offenders may be obtained.  It also requires sex offenders already required to register in a State to provide notice of each institution of higher education in that State at which the person is employed, carries a vocation, or is a student. In the State of Michigan, convicted sex offenders must register with the Sex Offender and Crimes Against Minors Registry maintained by the State Police.

 

The Sex Offenders Registration Act, MCL 28.721et seq., directs the Michigan State Police to develop and maintain a public registry and provides guidelines on the type of offender information available to the public.  The registration requirements of the Sex Offenders Registration Act are intended to provide the people of this state with an appropriate, comprehensive, and effective means to monitor those persons who pose such a potential danger.

 

Sex Offender Registration

 

In accordance with the Wetterling Act, Megan's Law and the Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act of 2000, it is now mandatory that all registered sex offenders report to the law enforcement agency having jurisdiction in which the institution of higher learning is located. Michigan Sex Offender Website

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NORTHERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

CAMPUS ASSESSMENT TEAM

 

 

Policy Statement:

 

Northern Michigan University is committed to providing a learning environment that is conducive for students to develop to their fullest potential. Our mission is to work collaboratively to protect, as much as possible, the health, safety and welfare of our students and the members of the university community.

 

Purpose:

 

This policy establishes the Behavioral Review Team as an official Northern Michigan University Team and establishes official policy for team responsibilities and operations.

 

Team Purpose and Responsibilities:

The purpose of the Behavioral Review Team is to review behavioral incidents and ensure a systematic response to students whose behavior may be disruptive or harmful to themselves or University community and to assist in protecting the health, safety and welfare of students and other members of the university community.

 

The Charge for This Team:

 

Assess situations involving a student who poses a potential risk of harm to persons or property in the university community or is of substantial disruption to university activities in accordance with policies stated in the Student Code of Conduct.

 

Consult with administration, faculty, staff and other students affected by the inappropriate behaviors of a disruptive student.

 

Coordinate the University response to a violent threat, or significantly disruptive student.

 

Develop a specific strategy to manage the threatening or disruptive behavior with regard to the safety and rights of others and to minimize the disruption to the university community.

 

Make recommendations to responsible University officials on appropriate action consistent with University policy and procedure statements and with state and federal law.

 

Team Composition: 

 

Dean of Students

Public Safety & Police Services

Housing & Resident Life

Counseling & Consultation Services

Health Center

Athletics

Human Resources

Title IV

 

Procedural Guidelines for Case Management

 

The beginning of each semester a notice will be sent to faculty and staff, through appropriate communication channels, stating the team is available for consultation when they are concerned about potentially harmful, threatening, or disruptive behavior of a student or students. This notice will be presented as a proactive measure.

 

If anyone on the campus community observes an incident of serious disruptive or threatening behavior, property damage, or a broken law, Public Safety and Police Services should be contacted immediately.  If a violation of an institutional rule occurs, the Dean of Students should be contacted immediately.

 

In time-sensitive high-risk situations, a special team meeting may be called by any member.

 

All meetings will be chaired by a Public Safety and Police Services representative.  If unavailable, the meeting will be chaired by a designated committee member.

 

 

The team will meet with affected members of the University community who desire to discuss the situation.

 

Please note that incidents regarding non-students (i.e. visitors, faculty/staff) should be directed to the Director of Public Safety who may notify the Threat Assessment Team.

 

The desired outcome of a consultation meeting is a recommended course of action based upon the Student Code of Conduct.  Specific issues for consideration include the assessment of potential violence, evidence of mental illness as the possible cause of the behavior, containment of disruption, appropriate behavioral boundaries within existing University policies and specific departmental procedures of courses of action.

 

Recommended departmental courses of action will be made only through appropriate administrative channels.

 

Case Information and Confidentiality Procedures:

 

Members of the team may provide each other or faculty/staff/students involved in a particular case, or outside parties in connection with the situation, with information as is necessary to protect the health, safety, and privacy of the student or other persons and to generate a recommended course of action in accordance with applicable legal and professional standards of confidentiality.  This includes the release of information pursuant to the Student Records Pursuant to the Family Educational Rights Act and Privacy Act of 1974.

If the student is involved in harmful, threatening, or disruptive activities and is already a client of the Student Counseling Center and/or a patient of the Student Health Center, contact information about that student may not be obtained by the team from those agencies without written authorization of the student, in accordance with federal and state law.

 

Workplace Violence Policy

 

This policy can be found at: the Workplace Violence Page.

Initiated: March8, 1999 Approved: June 10, 1999
Revised: September 12, 2001

 

Purpose

 

To establish a policy pertaining to the prohibition and investigation of incidents of violence, intimidation, and inappropriate aggression.

 

Applicability

 

All University employees, full time, part time, temporary, casual labor, students.

 

Policy

 

It is the policy of Northern Michigan University that all acts of violence by employees, students or visitors will be taken seriously and will be dealt with appropriately. All violent acts, or threats of violence should be reported and a single incident is sufficient ground for investigation, and may result in disciplinary action including termination, and/or arrest and prosecution.

 

References

 

Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Section 5(a) (1), Act 154 of Public Acts of 1974 as amended, Rule 408.1011, Section 11 and Public Act 381.

 

Initiating Department/Division

 

Public Safety & Police Services

 

 

 

Procedures

 

I. Scope:

 

This policy applies to all faculty, staff and student employees of the University and applies to acts of violence, intimidation, and inappropriate aggression of various types.

 

II. Definition:

 

Workplace violence is defined as any physical assault, with or without weapons, behavior that a reasonable person would interpret as violent (e.g., throwing items, pounding on objects, or destroying property) and specific threats to inflict physical harm or damage property.

 

III. Weapons:

 

Northern Michigan University Ordinances specifically prohibit the possession of weapons on property owned, leased or under the control of the University.

  1. Weapons are defined under the ordinance as any object capable of firing a projectile.
  2. This prohibition includes keeping a weapon in a vehicle in a parking area.
  3. Faculty, staff and students are prohibited from carrying concealed weapons on any property owned or under the control of the University.
  4. The only exceptions are certified police officers employed by the University or a recognized police agency.
  5. Violations of this ordinance may result in disciplinary action and/or criminal prosecution.

 

IV. Personal Protective or Restraining Orders:

 

Faculty, staff or students who have been issued a personal protective order or restraining order shall provide Public Safety with a copy of the order.

 

V. Contributing Factors:

 

Several factors have been identified as contributing factors to incidents of workplace violence.

  • Exchange of money
  • Working alone at night and during early morning hours
  • Availability of valued items
  • Availability of prescription drugs
  • Performing Public Safety functions
  • Working with patients, clients, customers, or students known or suspected to have a history of violence.
  • Employees, including former employees, with a history of assaults, or who exhibit belligerent, intimidating or threatening behavior
  • Employees or students who have been the object of belligerent, intimidating, or threatening behavior from family members or significant others.
  1. The Public Safety Crime Prevention and Security Specialist may conduct a security survey of the work place to determine the potential for workplace violence.
  2. Any department head or employee may request a security survey of their work area by calling the Crime Prevention Office at the Department of Public Safety.

 

VI. Reporting Procedures:

 

  1. Emergencies: For immediate assistance in an emergency (assault, direct threat of violence, attempted suicide, or any incident involving hostage, or weapon) or any crime in progress, or if you believe the situation is an emergency, dial 9-1-1.
  2. Reporting a Crime: Call the Department of Public Safety dispatcher line at 227-2151.
  3. Reporting Acts of Workplace Violence: If the act appears to represent an immediate threat or harm to any individual, it should be reported to Public Safety immediately.
    1. Any supervisor who becomes aware of an act of violence shall immediately report it to the Director, Public Safety (or designee).
    2. In situations where a person witnesses an instance of workplace violence Public Safety should be contacted immediately.
    3. Any employee who becomes aware of an act of violence shall immediately report it to their supervisor.
  4. When Immediate Action is Not Required: When concerned that a violent incident may occur and the concern is not based upon a threatened, attempted or actual violent incident, the employee should notify their immediate supervisor.
    1. Supervisors who become aware that an employee is concerned about an incident of potential violence should notify the Director, Public Safety (or designee).
    2. If the act appears to represent an immediate threat or harm to any individual, it should be reported to Public Safety immediately.
  5. This policy excludes incidents of sexual harassment because they are dealt with under separate University policy.
  6. Some disruptive, threatening, or violent behavior is prohibited by Michigan law. When appropriate, the University will refer cases to the Marquette County Prosecuting Attorney for possible criminal prosecution.
  7. An individual may be excluded from NMU property for certain reasons, including disruptive, threatening, or violent behavior. Faculty, staff or students may be suspended or put on leave under applicable University policies.
  8. No person who files a complaint, testifies, assists, or participates in any manner in an investigation, proceeding or hearing, shall be intimidated, threatened, coerced, or discriminated against by any other person within the University community.

 

VII. The Role of Public Safety:

 

Public Safety's primary role is to provide an immediate response to a crisis in progress. Not only by dispatching police officers but also by requesting and coordinating other emergency services, if needed. Prior to an actual occurrence, Public Safety's involvement will include the following: Participation on the Threat Assessment Team, providing physical security for threatened or at-risk persons, confronting the potentially violent person (under certain circumstances); enforcing applicable laws; and thoroughly investigating and documenting all incidents and actions. In addition, Public Safety will conduct all employee background investigations and serve as the repository for all personal protective orders.

 

VIII. The Role of Human Resources:

 

Human Resources is responsible for assisting in the prevention of violence in the workplace by providing advice and counsel to managers, supervisors, and employees when faced with threats or other situations that have the potential for violence. Human Resources will assist campus departments in the implementation of appropriate personal practices used in the hiring, supervision and retention of employees. They will also assist, as appropriate, in the investigation of threats of violence and addresses related issues that are of legitimate concern to employees.

 

IX. Composition of the Threat Assessment Team:

 

A team approach has been developed and implemented to address concerns about an employee or incident which could be potentially threatening to the campus community. The team approach allows the supervisor or employee to meet with appropriate professionals at the same time and provides a broad perspective on how to handle a potential problem. There may be times when only one or two team members will be called to respond to a particular incident. Confidentiality is adhered to except when danger to self or other becomes apparent. Federal laws require mandated reporting to appropriate authorities when potential violence to an identified person or workplace is reported.

  • Director, Public Safety (or designee)
  • Director, Human Resources (or designee)
  • Risk Manager
  • Dean of Students (Incidents Involving Students)
  • University Counseling Center Representative
  • University Community Representative (Faculty or Staff member)
  • Student Representative (Incidents Involving Students)
  • Employee Assistance Program Representative
  • Employee's Department Head

 

  1. When an incident is referred to the Threat Assessment Team by the Director, Public Safety, they will investigate the incident and determine measures to prevent reoccurrences. A report outlining the result of the investigation and recommendations for preventive action will be prepared and submitted to the University President.
  2. The Threat Assessment Team may also be asked to assess the risk of violence in the workplace and make recommendation to address the situation and prevent violence from occurring.
  3. The following protocol will be followed by the Threat Assessment Team or Public Safety:
  4. Reviewing Previous Incidents
  5. Visiting the scene of an incident as soon as possible
  6. Interviewing threatened or injured employees and witnesses
  7. 4.   Examining the workplace for security risk factors associated with the incident, including previous reports of inappropriate behavior by the perpetrator.

    5.   Determining the cause of the incident

    6.   Taking corrective action to prevent the incident from recurring

    7.   Recording the findings and corrective actions taken

     

    X. Dissemination of the Policy:

     

    The workplace violence policy is disseminated to all University Vice Presidents, Deans, Directors and Department Heads. They will distribute it among their employees.

     


     

    NORTHERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY CRIME STATISTICS 2011-2013


    This chart contains the number of reported crimes on campus required by the

    Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act

    -Formerly known as the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990.

     

    Nature Of Complaint

    RPTD
    2011

    RPTD 2012

    RPTD 2013

    Aggravated Assault*

    2

    1

    3

    Arson

    0

    0

    0

    Burglary

    20

    7

    14

    CSC**

    14

    9

    7

    Drug Laws

    40

    47

    81

    Liquor Law Violations

    34

    46

    28

    Auto Theft

    2

    2

    2

    Manslaughter

    0

    0

    0

    Murder

    0

    0

    0

    Robbery

    0

    0

    0

    Weapons Violations

    0

    0

    0

     

     

     

     

    Hate Crimes - On campus

    For the criminal offenses listed below, first enter the total number of Hate Crimes that were reported to have occurred On campus. Then break down each total by category of bias (e.g., race, religion).

     

    Occurrences of Hate crimes

    Criminal offense

    2013 Total

    Category of Bias for crimes reported in 2012

     

    Race

    Religion

    Sexual orientation

    Gender

    Disability

    Ethnicity/
    National origin

     

    a. Murder/ Non-negligent manslaughter

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    b. Negligent manslaughter

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    c. Sex offenses - Forcible

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    d. Sex offenses - Non-forcible

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     

             Incest

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

             Statutory rape

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    e. Robbery

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    f. Aggravated assault

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    g. Burglary

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    h. Motor vehicle theft
    (Do not include theft from a motor vehicle)

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    i. Arson

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    j. Simple assault

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    k. Larceny-theft

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    l. Intimidation

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    m. Destruction/damage/ vandalism of property

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

     

     

     

    Occurrences of Hate crimes

     

    Criminal offense

    2012 Total

    Category of Bias for crimes reported in 2010

     

    Race

    Religion

    Sexual orientation

    Gender

    Disability

    Ethnicity/
    National origin

     

    a. Murder/ Non-negligent manslaughter

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    b. Negligent manslaughter

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    c. Sex offenses - Forcible

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    d. Sex offenses - Non-forcible

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     

             Incest

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

             Statutory rape

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    e. Robbery

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    f. Aggravated assault

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    g. Burglary

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    h. Motor vehicle theft
    (Do not include theft from a motor vehicle)

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    i. Arson

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    j. Simple assault

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    k. Larceny-theft

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    l. Intimidation

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    m. Destruction/damage/ vandalism of property

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

     

     

    Occurrences of Hate crimes

     

    Criminal offense

    2011 Total

    Category of Bias for crimes reported in 2009

     

    Race

    Religion

    Sexual orientation

    Gender

    Disability

    Ethnicity/
    National origi

     

    a. Murder/ Non-negligent manslaughter

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     

    b. Negligent manslaughter

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

     

    c. Sex offenses - Forcible

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     

    d. Sex offenses - Non-forcible

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     

             Incest

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     

             Statutory rape

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     

    e. Robbery

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     

    f. Aggravated assault

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     

    g. Burglary

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     

    h. Motor vehicle theft

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     

    i. Arson

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     

    j. Simple assault

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     

    k. Larceny-theft

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     

    l. Intimidation

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     

    m. Destruction/damage/ vandalism of property

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     0

     
     

     

     

     

    Northern Michigan University

    Higher Education Opportunity Act

    2013 Fire Safety Annual Compliance Report

    Building Fire Safety Systems

    All University buildings are equipped with fire safety systems. In addition, all on-campus dorms have sprinkler systems; pull stations, horn/strobe audible alarms, and smoke/heat detectors.

    Description of Fire Safety System

    All Residence Halls (10)

    Each residence hall room and all common areas, except laundry rooms and mechanical rooms, are monitored with addressable photoelectric sensors (smoke detectors). Laundry rooms and mechanical rooms are monitored with addressable heat sensors. All detectors have been installed per appropriate codes and are networked using a dedicated copper backbone cable to a local annunciation panel located in each residence hall lobby. A residence hall room smoke detector that goes into alarm will also cause an alarm in the resident director’s apartment and in the appropriate resident adviser’s room. The fire detection system in each residence hall is networked using dedicated copper cable and/or fiber optic cable to the University’s Public Safety and Police Services Office, where it is continuously monitored.

    All residence hall rooms, bathrooms, and common areas are covered by a wet pipe fire suppression system. The attic spaces in the four recently renovated residence halls – Magers, Meyland, Van Antwerp, and Hunt Halls – are protected with a dry pipe system. The fire suppression system is monitored locally and centrally in the same manner as the fire/smoke detection system

    Fire Alarms

    Every time any building fire alarm sounds, you must immediately evacuate the building, regardless of what may have caused the alarm.

    Activated Fire Alarms, Notification to the Department of Public Safety

    For on-campus buildings (Stateside buildings, Resident halls, and Woodland Apts.) whenever a fire alarm system is activated, a signal is received at the Public Safety Dispatch Center.  Public Safety Officers are immediately dispatched to respond and quickly determine the cause of the alarm.

    Residence Hall Fire Drills

    Fire drills are conducted each semester in each residence facility.  All rooms are searched to insure there is full evacuation. Anyone who does not promptly evacuate is referred to the Dean of Students for disciplinary action.

     

    Number of Fire Drills Held - 2012

    Gant Hall - 8

    Halverson Hall – 8

    Hunt Hall – 8

    Magers Hall – 8

    Meyland Hall – 8

    Payne Hall – 8

    Spalding Hall – 8

    Spooner Hall – 8

    Van Antwerp Hall – 8

    West Hall - 8

     

    Evacuation Procedures

    Residence hall students - A flier / building diagram is posted on the back of every residence hall room door that states:

    Student Housing Evacuation Procedures

    Residence hall students - A flier/building diagram is posted on the back of every residence hall room door that states:

    Fire Alarm Instructions

    1.         Prepare to leave your room immediately, but feel your room door before opening it.
    2.         If your room door is hot to the touch and you are above the 1st floor, stay in your room (you are safer there):

  8. Seal off cracks with towels or blankets (wet if possible) around the door to your room.
  9. Stay near your window to let emergency personnel know where you are, and be signaling from your window and/or by calling Public Safety and Police Services (911).
  10. Emergency personnel will let you know what to do and will provide you with assistance.
  11. 3.            If your room door is hot and you are on the 1st floor, you can leave your room though your window if it is safe to do so.

    4.         If your room door is cool, open your door cautiously. Be prepared to close it quickly if smoke or heat comes in:

    -If your room door is clear, leave your room immediately, making sure your room door is closed. Leave the building by the most direct route.

    -If the most direct route is blocked by fire, intense smoke or emergency personnel, use another exit.

    -If both routes are blocked, return to your room (see procedures above).

  12. Once you have left the building, stay out, and stand away from the entrances until the alarm has been shut off and you are given permission to re-enter.
  13. Fire in Room

  14. If the fire is in your room, get out and close your room door.
  15. Pull the nearest fire alarm and leave the building.
  16. If you have access to a phone, call 911 - Public Safety and Police Services - and report the fire, your hall and
  17. room number.

  18. Once you have left the building, stay out, and stand away from the entrances until the alarm has been shut off
  19. and you are given permission to re-enter.

    False Fire Alarms

    Causing a false fire alarm is not only against University policy and an inconvenience to everyone in the building, it is also a crime.  The University takes this very seriously, and will act swiftly and severely with anyone who causes a false fire alarm.  Those found responsible for causing a false fire alarm are charged by the University police department with the criminal charge of FIRE-FALSE ALARM (750.240), are processed by the court system, and are referred to the Dean of Students for disciplinary action.

    Tampering with Fire Safety Equipment

    Tampering with any fire safety equipment, whether it is a pull station, smoke or heat detector, sprinkler head, horn/strobe unit or fire extinguisher, is also a crime and against University policy.  Your life is too valuable to have someone tamper with fire safety equipment in your residence facility; don't allow yourself to be put in jeopardy.

    Escaping a Fire

    If there is a fire in your room, get out immediately and close the door.  Once out, call 911.  If there is a fire in your building, feel your door before opening it; if it feels hot, do not open it.  Seal the cracks around it with sheets or clothes to prevent smoke from entering. If the outside air is clean, open the window and wave a sheet to attract rescuers.  Use the phone to call Public Safety.  If the door is cool, open it, leave and close it behind you.  Proceed to the nearest exit.  If there is smoke in the hallway, stay low where the air is freshest.  A wet cloth over your mouth and nose will also help you to breathe. Never use elevators during a fire.  Know more than one way out of the building.  Remember, leave the building immediately.  Don't try to save your possessions; it could cost you your life.

    Keep Stairwells and Hallways Clear

    All corridors, stairwells and public areas must be kept free of obstructions.  Be sure that no furniture or University or personal belongings are left in the hallways.

    Fire Doors Must Remain Closed

    Hallway, stairwell and residence room doors are considered fire doors and are there to protect you from smoke and flame.  These doors are “fire rated” to provide such protection.  However, they are of no value if they are propped open, allowing heat, smoke or flames to travel down the hallway or into another area.  Please be sure that all fire doors are always closed.

    Decorations that pose a fire hazard and anything hung from the ceiling are prohibited.  Draperies and tapestries must be rated flame resistant (NFPA 701).  Doorways and all egresses must be kept free and clear at all times.  Excessive decorations that are deemed to pose a potential fire hazard (type of material, flammability) are prohibited.

    Extension Cords

    The only extension cords allowed are UL listed surge protected, with built-in circuit breakers. Extension cords must never be overloaded or placed across the room threshold, under rugs or anywhere they can be stepped on.

    Appliances

    The only appliances allowed in the residence halls are coffee makers, popcorn poppers and hot pots. Open heating devices are not allowed.

    Portable electrical appliances

    Student Code Administrative Policy #2.3.6: Electrical Appliances - Because of the hazards of fire and the limits on the amount of electricity which can be safely used on any electrical circuit, good judgment should be exercised in using electrical appliances in University housing facilities. Television sets are permitted in residence hall rooms provided all occupants of the room agree. Sun lamps, clamp-on-bed lamps, electrical heaters, open-element popcorn poppers, hot plates, indoor grills, hazardous electrical appliances, and appliances in need of electrical repair are specifically prohibited.

    Single Student Apartment Contract #13: Specifically Prohibited Items - The following are not permitted in the apartments – candles, incense, flammable or explosive materials (e.g., gun powder, gasoline, propane), sun lamps, clamp-on bed lamps, electrical heaters, and hot plates.

    Egress

    All hallways and stairwells must be kept free and clear and allow for the smooth flow of occupants at all times. Property may not be stored or placed in these areas. Any items found in these areas will be confiscated.

    Prohibited Items May be Confiscated

    Items that are prohibited from the residence halls and deemed to be a fire hazard may be confiscated by the Housing and  Residential Life or Public Safety and Police Services staff.

    Prohibited in Residence Halls

    Fireworks and Fuel - The possession, use or sale of fireworks is illegal and against University policy. Any fuel, including but not limited to kerosene, gasoline, propane and charcoal lighter fluid is strictly prohibited in any University residence hall or apartment.

    Open Flames

    Student Code Regulation #2.2.15: Fireworks - No students shall possess, explode, or cause to explode firecrackers or other types of fireworks or explosives in any building or on any property owned or controlled by the University.

    Student Code Regulation #2.2.7: Dangerous Materials and Open Flame

    .01       No students shall, on University property, possess, store, mix, or experiment with any chemical or explosive materials including, but not limited to, gunpowder and gasoline, which may be injurious to the lives and safety of the University community. This regulation shall not apply to instructor supervised learning activities.

    .02       Unless acting in compliance with a specific written exemption to this regulation from the Dean of Students, no students shall use or create an open flame, or use live or glowing embers or charcoal in any University buildings. This regulation shall not apply to instructor supervised learning activities. Smoking is permitted in compliance with University Regulation 2.2.29. Requests for exception to this regulation for ceremonial or religious purposes may be sought by making a written application to the Dean of Students.

    Student Code Administrative Policy #2.3.4: Candles - Because of the danger of fire, the use of or making of candles is prohibited in residence hall rooms and the Woodland Park apartments.

    Residence Hall Contract Terms and Conditions # 11: Fire Safety - Students shall not bring or allow anyone else to bring any combustible or flammable materials (including, but not limited to gun powder, gasoline, and propane gas tanks) into the room or efficiency apartment that will increase the risk of fire or contravene University rules, regulations, or Ordinances. Tampering with smoke detectors, sprinklers, or other fire safety equipment is prohibited.

    Single Student Apartment Contract #11: Fire Safety - The tenant shall not bring or allow anyone else to bring any combustible or flammable materials into the apartment that will increase the risk of fire or contravene University rules, regulations, or Ordinances. Tampering with smoke detectors, sprinklers, or door closers is prohibited. Fire extinguishers must be used for fires only and must not be removed except in the case of a fire. Expended fire extinguishers or those with low pressure must be reported to the Housing and Residence Life Office immediately.

    Single Student Apartment Contract #13: Specifically Prohibited Items - The following are not permitted in the apartments – candles, incense, flammable or explosive materials (e.g., gun powder, gasoline, propane) …

    Student Family Lease #14: Fire Safety - The tenant shall not bring, or allow anyone else to bring any combustible or flammable materials (including, but not limited to propane gas tanks) into the apartment that will increase the risk of fire or contravene University rules, regulations or ordinances. Portable electric heaters are prohibited. Tampering with smoke detectors is prohibited. The fire extinguisher must be used for fires only and must not be removed from the hanger except in the case of a fire. Expended fire extinguishers should be reported to the Housing and Residence Life Office immediately for replacement.

    1. Fire Safety Education and Training

    Students

    All Summer Orientation Sessions: Housing and Residence Life Meeting – During each Summer Orientation Session (6) students meet with the director of housing and residence life.

    During that meeting, several fire safety topics are covered:

    -Causes of fires in residence halls (national)

    -Appliances permitted

    -Minimum expectations for power strips

    -Prohibited items: candles, incense, and smoking

    -Fire safety system equipment in University residence halls

    -Fire drills and what is expected of students in the event of a fire drill or alarms

     

    Initial residence hall meeting (resident adviser with students in his or her house) - Topics from meeting agenda:

  20. Highlights from Administrative Policies
    1. Candles (and incense) – prohibited
    2. Electrical appliances – what is allowed/no Foreman grills
  21. Use a power strip with a circuit breaker and surge protector for power to your electrical equipment - (16 gauge wire and 3 prong grounded plug)
  22. Fire safety
  23. a.   Equipment – Talk about the importance of not tampering with fire safety equipment (sprinklers, smoke detector – both are monitored by Public Safety and Police Services - fire extinguishers, fire alarms, etc.).

  24. Fire alarms – 8 throughout the year.  Tell them what to do if one rings.
  25. If there is a fire:
    1. Get out
    2. Close your doors
    3. Pull an alarm – the only time it’s okay to do so
    4. Get out of the building
  26. Employees

    Residence halls – Fire safety and building evacuation procedures are covered during both the professional staff and the paraprofessional staff training.

    Title of Persons/Organization to Whom Students and Employees Report a Fire

    Public Safety and Police Services (911)

    Future Improvements in Fire Safety

    1.         Update the apartment lease to state that candles are prohibited

    2.         Evaluate residence hall staff training

    3.         Evaluate the need for additional smoke detectors in the Norwood / Center apartment buildings.

    Holiday Decorations

    Because they are highly combustible, natural Christmas trees and wreaths are prohibited. All holiday lighting must be UL listed and approved. Holiday decorations that are considered excessive or a potential fire safety hazard are prohibited.

    Wall Hangings

    It is recommended that not more than 10 percent of the available wall space used for wall hangings must be adhered to. Anything that is highly combustible or flammable is prohibited.

    Decorations that pose a fire hazard and anything hung from the ceiling are prohibited.  Draperies and tapestries must be rated flame resistant (NFPA 701).  Doorways and all egresses must be kept free and clear at all times.  Excessive decorations that are deemed to pose a potential fire hazard (type of material, flammability) are prohibited.

    Fire Safety:  It's everyone's responsibility

    National Fire Prevention Association Facts:

    In 1998, there were an estimated 1,380 structure fires in school, college and university dormitories and fraternity and sorority housing. These fires resulted in 87 injuries and $5.8 million in direct property damage. From 1994 to 1998, there were 16 fire-related deaths on campuses.

     

    The leading cause of fire in these types of occupancies was incendiary or suspicious. The 2nd and 3rd leading causes of these on and off campus housing fires were cooking and smoking, respectively.

    An annual average of 141 structure fires occurred in fraternity and sorority houses per year between 1994 and 1998, resulting in 17 injuries and $2.8 million in direct property damage.

    Smoke or fire alarms were present in 93 percent of all dormitory fires in 1998, and sprinklers were present in 35 percent of these fires. On average, direct property damage per fire is 41 percent lower in dormitory fires where sprinklers are present, compared to those where sprinklers are not present.

    Campus Residential Student Housing Sprinkler and Fire Detection

    Undergraduate Building

    Fully Sprinkled

    Fire Detection

    Gant Hall

    Yes

    Yes

    Halverson Hall

    Yes

    Yes

    Hunt Hall

    Yes

    Yes

    Magers Hall

    Yes

    Yes

    Meyland Hall

    Yes

    Yes

    Payne Hall

    Yes

    Yes

    Spalding Hall

    Yes

    Yes

    Spooner Hall

    Yes

    Yes

    VanAntwerp Hall

    Yes

    Yes

    West Hall

    Yes

    Yes

     

    Campus Residential Student Housing Fire Report 2013

    Undergraduate Building

    Fires

    Fire Cause

    Injuries

    Deaths

    Property Damage

    Gant Hall

    1

    0

    0

    0

    0

    Halverson Hall

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    Hunt Hall

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    Magers Hall

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    Meyland Hall

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    Payne Hall

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    Spalding Hall

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    Spooner Hall

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    VanAntwerp Hall

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    West Hall

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

                                                                                                           

     

     

    Fires - Summary

     

     

    2013

    2012

    2011

    Name of Facility

    Fires

    Injuries

    Deaths

    Fires

    Injuries

    Deaths

    Fires

    Injuries

    Deaths

    600 Summit Apartments

     0

     0

     0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    700 Summit Apartments

     0

     0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    800 Summit Apartments

     0

     0

     0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    Center Apartments

     0

     0

     0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    1200 Norwood Apartments

     0

     0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    1100 Norwood Apartments

     0

     0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    1

    0

    0

    Lincoln Apartments

     0

     0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    1

    0

    0

    Magers Hall

     0

    0

     0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    Spooner Hall

     0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    West Hall

     0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    Gant Hall

     1

     0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    Spalding Hall

      0

     0

     0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    Payne Hall

      0

     0

     0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    Halverson Hall

     0

     0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    Meyland Hall

      0

     0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    Hunt Hall

      0

     0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    VanAntwerp Hall

      0

     0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    Woodland Apartments

     0

     0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    Total

     1

     0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    2

    0

    0

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    2013 Yearly Fire Log

    Date Occurred

    Time Occurred

    General Location

    Nature of the Fire

    04/18/2013

    1941 hours

    Gant Hall –  

    First Floor

    Accidental fire – pair of wet socks placed on lamp to dry caught fire.  Extinguished.

           
     

    2012 Yearly Fire Log

    Date Occurred

    Time Occurred

    General Location

    Nature of the Fire

         

    No fires reported.

     

    2011 Yearly Fire Log

    Date Occurred

    Time Occurred

    General Location

    Nature of the Fire

    1/19/2011

    0743 hours

    1701 Lincoln Apts.

    Paper plate ignited on stove top causing minor fire put out by tenant. Public Safety and Marquette Fire Department responded but not needed as fire extinguished prior to arrival. No personal or university property damage caused.

    4/10/2011

    2201 hours

    Woodland Apartments

    Right back side burner on the stove top ignited from items left on the burner, (plate/grease). A fire extinguisher was used. No injury or damage.