Photos

Archived Stories

Fall 2016:

NCLL, with Fred Huffman from North Country Tours as guide, loaded up a Checker bus and headed for Pictured Rocks Lakeshore and Grand Marais to take in the fall colors and some history as well as socialize with fellow NCLLers.  It was a full day of seeing mother nature’s creations, learning about the history of Grand Marais and exploring this picturesque village.

The Chippewa Indians lived at Grand Marais for many years before the Europeans arrived. In 1829, Grand Marais was in its peak population of 2000-3000 due to lumber camps, mills and the commercial fishing industry.  It had a hospital, lawyers, bankers, an opera house, livery stables, a cigar maker and more.  A daily train ran from Seney and connected with other lines leading all across the nation.  In 1911 the lumber companies and railroads closed and residents packed their bags and caught the train out. By 1915 there were only about 200 people left.  In the mid-1920s highways opened and the motoring tourists discovered the village and tourism is now the primary industry.

Historical Society President Pat Munger welcomed and acquainted us with the village and was our tour guide for the Lighthouse Keeper’s Museum and the Pickle Barrel House Museum. The Pickel Barrel Museum was built for Wm. Donahey, creator of the Chicago Tribune cartoon story The Teenie Weenies. Donahey spent 10 summers in the cottage with his wife, Mary, herself a noted author of children’s books.  The Teenie Weenies debuted in The Tribune in 1914 and continued until his death in 1970.  The cartoon story featured miniature people who lived in a world of life-sized objects.  This led to a contract with Reid, Murdoch and Company which packaged food products such as Monarch-brand pickles as well as other food products.  Teenie Weenie books were translated into several languages and sold worldwide.

Sable Falls, Miner’s Castle, Munising Falls are always a thrill to see and remind us of  how fortunate we are to live in this great place call the Upper Peninsula.

By Sally Olsen, NCLL Liaison; Photos contributed by Eric Rehorst and Lawrence Ellerbruch.

 

Summer 2016:

NCLL participants recently took a road/field trip to thriving area of Bark River. While it was a bit of a rocky start it turned out to be a great day. Our first stop was the Ten Mile Forge and Gift Shop which is nestled in a beautiful setting. George is a world renown blackswinery photomith whose specialty is making knives out of Damascus steel, hand carved scrimshaw handles and sheaths.  The demonstration was impressive and we quickly learned he is a true artist, a wealth of knowledge as well as a good story teller.  We were “shaking our heads” in awe trying to process it all.   Maureen’s unique Irish/Celtic Gift shop is small but full of not only George’s handiwork but local jewelry, artwork, pottery, etc. Learn more at http://www.Exploringthenorth.com/tenmile/forge.html

 We then headed for the Home Base Restaurant and Bar for a tasty lunch including Theresa’s home-made rhubarb/strawberry pie and rhubarb torte and I managed to get the recipe for it. Stop in when in that area. On to the Northern Sun Winery owned and operated by Dave and Sue Anthony, where the 4000 vines that make up over 5.2 acres of the farm are used to make their special blends such as the “Rhubarb,” the “Marquette” and the “Brianna.”  They have found just the right grape varieties that grow in the local soil and climate and have already won international wine awards for their LaCrescent wine. We toured the vineyard, saw where and how the grapes were processed, and of course had an opportunity to taste and purchase wine.  Susie’s enthusiasm is infectious and the staff is truly a part of the winery. They also host a summer concert series which would be great to attend.  Check them out at http://www.northernsunwinery.com/

By Sally Olsen, NCLL Liaison

 

A few photos from the past

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