U.P. WRITING PROJECT RECEIVES GRANTS

            MARQUETTE – The Upper Peninsula Writing Project (UPWP) at Northern Michigan University has received a total of $52,000 in grants from the National Writing Project.

            The UPWP will apply the funding to several projects. A $3,000 mini-grant will be used to sponsor the Rural Sites Poetry Competition, an event that will give an area high school student the opportunity to read his or her poetry in Washington, D.C., in May with U.S. Poet Laureate Ted Kooser.

            NMU faculty and graduate assistants from the English department will serve as judges for the competition and choose the top 10 poets, who will be awarded savings bonds.

            The mini-grant will also be put toward a local celebration for the competition at the Landmark Inn on May 20. The event will include a luncheon and a poetry reading by students who entered the competition.

            “The awarding of the grant and mini-grants demonstrates the commitment and outstanding quality of the teachers who are at the heart of the UPWP network,” said Suzanne Standerford, NMU professor and UPWP co-director. “I feel extremely honored to be a part of this network, and I am proud of the many ways that the members enrich writing instruction in schools across the U.P., Lower Peninsula, and Wisconsin.”

            The UPWP was awarded a base grant of $42,000 after it received positive feedback from the National Writing Project on its annual evaluation report. It also received $3,000 to fund the work and travel of two technology liaisons and another $4,000 for use of the Advanced Institute on Teacher Inquiry of Mentor texts at the University of Minnesota Kerlan Research Library.   

            The UPWP is a university-based organization of, by, and for teachers of writing at all grade levels and in all disciplines. It is dedicated to improving the teaching and uses of

writing through a variety of programs, which introduce teachers to informed and effective practices in writing instruction that have emerged over the past thirty years.



Prepared By
Becky Kratz
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