Argonne 2008

NMU Students at 2008 Argonne SymposiumNorthern Michigan University students attended the 19th Annual Argonne Symposium For Undergraduates In Science, Engineering, And Mathematics held at Argonne National Laboratory in Argonne, Illinois, USA, on Friday 7 November 2008.

The Argonne Symposium is an opportunity for undergraduates to engage in research of their own and to attend presentations of research done by others.

There were two hundred fifty-two total talks given in seventeen sessions spanning different areas of science.

Following were the NMU student talks:

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY:
Benjamin E. Wilson:  Determination of the Effect on Permeability of Silicone Compounds on Calcium.  This is the one I missed because I couldn't find the room.

ASTROPHYSICS AND GEOPHYSICS:
Sarah E. Meade:  Measurement of the (alpha,gamma) Cross Sections of (49)TN, (64)ZN, (114)SN, and (116)SN at Astrophysically Relevant Energies.  I didn't really understand this one.

COMPUTER SCIENCE I AND MATHEMATICS:
Brian J. Krent, Cory R. Perry:  Peering into the [Artificial] Mind's Eye:  A 3D Visualization of an Artificial Neural Network Trained on Music Waveforms.  Brian and Cory have been working with Dr. Jeffrey Horn on neural networks for a couple of years now.  This was a continuation of some work they presented last year.

Christopher E. Wells:  3D Visualization of Simulated Trophic Cascades. Another project completed under Dr. Horn.

COMPUTER SCIENCE II:
Christopher Ohman, Joshua Cook, Paul Erickson, James Ives:  Benchmarking Windows Vs. Linux:  A Performance Comparison.  These guys were very nervous before their talk, but they did a great job and elicited a lot of audience participation.  Dr. Randy R. Appleton supervised this project.

Stephen J. Kwiatkowski, Axel Cisluycis:  Unsupervised Learning and Evolution of Neural Controllers for Bipedal Balance in a 3D Physics Environment.  Also supervised by Dr. Horn.  Axel, incidentally, is a high school student who does individualized study with Dr. Horn.

Rebecca M. Fisk:  The Island:  A Computer Simulation of a Multi-Tiered Predator/Prey Food Web.  Also supervised by Dr. Horn.

INORGANIC AND ORGANIC CHEMISTRY:
Ivy M. Vachon:  Ultraviolet-visible Characterization of Para-substituted Phenylacetylenes and Comparison to Novel Highly Polarized Molecules Utilizing a Propellane-derived Linker Unit.  Another one I didn't follow terribly well, but it drew a large and enthusiastic audience.

CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS AND PHYSICS:
Bradley D. Schoenrock:  Neutron Detector Assembly For a High Precision Measurement of the Electric Form Factor of the Neutron.  This is the one I missed because it was in another building and thus couldn't make due to travel time.

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