Northern’s English Language Institute

 

NELI

 

 

STUDENT HANDBOOK

2013 - 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

nmu.edu/esl

 

Welcome to

Northern’s English Language Institute

NELI

 

Dear NELI Students,

Welcome to the English Language Institute at Northern Michigan University!

This Student Handbook has information to help you during your time in the NELI program (ESL) at Northern Michigan University. Please read your Student Handbook to find answers to questions you may have about NELI, about Northern Michigan University, and about living in Marquette, Michigan. Also, be sure to ask me – or your instructors – if you have any questions about anything while you are here.

To be successful, attend every class and required event, study hard, ask questions, and get involved in student activities. Please talk with your teachers if you have questions or concerns. Please try not to be shy if you have questions or are confused about anything. We do not expect you to be able to speak English perfectly. You are here to learn – and we are here to help you! We want you to be successful and happy while you are here.

You may speak with me, Dr. Jo Doran, the NELI Coordinator, at any time I am in my office: 163 Whitman. Additionally, you may email me: cdoran@nmu.edu

Also, know that you may speak with Angela Maki, the Executive Secretary of International Programs, regarding immigration and/or financial issues. Please see contact information.

Whether you are a returning student or a new student in the NELI program, we welcome you!

 

Dr. Jo Doran

NELI Coordinator

cdoran@nmu.edu

 

NELI Mission Statement

 

The mission of the English Language Institute at Northern Michigan University is to assist non-native speakers of English in acquiring sufficient language proficiency and independent learning strategies to become successful participants in the Northern Michigan University community, their personal lives, and their chosen occupations via proven instructional methodologies in reading, writing, listening, speaking, and grammar; monitored social activities; and intercultural experiences.

NELI accomplishes this mission by offering language instruction and cultural orientation in the following areas:

  • A six-session program – focusing on academic components of reading/writing, listening/speaking, and grammar/language applications – consisting of one seven and one eight week session per semester to allow students to enroll at one of the five session times throughout the year:
  • August
  • October
  • January
  • March
  • May
  • A Dual Enrollment Course that allows for transition into credit-bearing classes at Northern Michigan University for students who do not earn a high-enough MELAB test score
  • A Pre-Beginner Listening/Speaking Program for pre-beginners
  • Possible Practicum Positions for advanced students where they work with the NELI Coordinator
  • Accent Reduction Sessions with tutors from NMU’s Speech Pathology and Audiology department
  • Conversation Mentors activities with NMU volunteers
  • Game Time with tutors from NMU’s Speech Pathology and Audiology department
  • Individualized instruction with instructors each week
  • Language Lab services with trained tutors
  • Study Hall availability
  • Monthly Social Events
  • Club/Organization Participation (over 200 clubs available)
  • Team Teaching every week
  • Elective classes offered twice a year

Our sessions allow individuals who need to re-take a class to spend only 7 or 8 weeks re-taking that class – instead of a 15- or 16-week semester.

 

NELI is working toward accreditation with the

Commission on English Language Programs (CEA)

 

CONTACT INFORMATION

 

NELI Contact Information

Jo Doran, PhD, MFA


Phone:            906.227.2594

Fax:                 906.227.1578

Website:         nmu.edu/esl

Email:              cdoran@nmu.edu

Office:             163 Whitman Hall

 

Address:        

Dr. Jo Doran

ESL Coordinator – NELI Program

163 Whitman Hall

1401 Presque Isle Ave.

Northern Michigan University

Marquette, MI 49855

 

Office: The NELI office is closed Saturday and Sunday, as well as major holidays.


NELI Faculty


Dr. Jo Doran, NELI Coordinator, cdoran@nmu.edu                               163 Whitman   227.2594

Tiffany Comfort, tcomfort@nmu.edu                                                       162 Whitman   227.1837

Dinara Fisher, difisher@nmu.edu                                                              157 Whitman   227.2940

Emily Kaney, ekaney@nmu.edu                                                                162 Whitman   227.1896

Alex Gubbins, agubbins@nmu.edu                                                            236 Gries Hall  227-1889


Office Staff: NELI and International Programs


Kevin Timlin, International Program Director, ktimlin@nmu.edu          2101 Hedgcock   227.2428

Angela Maki, Executive Secretary, anmaki@nmu.edu                             2101 Hedgcock   227.2510

Susan Morgan, Assistant International Program Director and

     Education Abroad/Exchange Program, smorgan@nmu.edu              2101 Hedgcock   227.2530

Tony Tollefson, International Students, ttollefs@nmu.edu                    2101 Hedgcock   227.2509

Corey Engelhart, Graduate Assistant, cengelha@nmu.edu                     2101 Hedgcock   227.2510

Sarah Flack, Student Worker, saflack@nmu.edu                                      2101 Hedgcock   227.2510

Yuen Kwan Chau, Student Worker, ychau@nmu.edu                              2101 Hedgcock   227.2510

 

 

                                                                                               

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Welcome...................................................................................................................................... 2

Mission Statement......................................................................................................................... 3

Contact Information...................................................................................................................... 4

Abbreviations Used in this Handbook............................................................................................... 6

ABOUT NELI

Introduction to NELI.......................................................................................................... 8

Class Levels and Contact Hours........................................................................................... 8

Course Program Overview.................................................................................................. 9

Overview of NELI Curricular Levels: Benchmarks.................................................................. 10

Course Descriptions.......................................................................................................... 11

NELI Testing and Placement............................................................................................... 16

Coursework..................................................................................................................... 17

Rules and Requirements for NELI Students........................................................................... 18

Questions about Attendance............................................................................................. 18

Grading Policies................................................................................................................ 21

NELI Attendance and Feedback Form (Sample).................................................................... 21

How to Address your Instructors in the U.S......................................................................... 22

Studying Expectations in U.S. Universities............................................................................ 22

Academic Honesty........................................................................................................... 26

NELI Student Honor Code Agreement................................................................................. 25

NMU Student Code Information (from the NMU Student Handbook).................................... 23

Grade Appeal Process...................................................................................................... 28

Promotion...................................................................................................................... 28

Probation....................................................................................................................... 28

Disability Services for students........................................................................................... 29

Fire Safety & Emergency Procedures (URL)......................................................................... 29

Online Academic Resource and Services.............................................................................. 30

Mobile Device from NMU..................................................................................................... 30

RESOURCES

                  Program Picnics............................................................................................................... 32

                  Language Partners............................................................................................................ 32

                  Game Time....................................................................................................................... 32

                  Social Dinners................................................................................................................... 32

                  Crunch Lunches................................................................................................................ 32

                  Individualized Instruction.................................................................................................. 33

                  Language Lab................................................................................................................... 33

                  Conversation Mentors...................................................................................................... 33

                  Team Teaching................................................................................................................. 33

TESTING & ADMITTANCE INTO NMU

                  English Proficiency............................................................................................................ 35

                  MELAB............................................................................................................................ 35

                  TOEFL............................................................................................................................. 35

TUITION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION

NELI Tuition..................................................................................................................... 37

Paying Your Bills & Payment Plans....................................................................................... 37

Transferring Money to Northern Michigan University............................................................ 38

NMU Student Health Insurance.......................................................................................... 39

Helpful Hints about Health................................................................................................ 40

NMU’s Counseling Services................................................................................................ 41

Continuing your education at Northern Michigan University after NELI.................................... 41

International Students at NMU........................................................................................... 41

IMMIGRATION INFORMATION

Helpful Terms You Should Know......................................................................................... 43

U.S. Immigration Rules & Regulations for F-1 Student............................................................ 45

Maintaining your F-1 or J-1 (Full-Time Student) Status............................................................ 46

Employment.................................................................................................................... 46

U.S. Government Agencies Important to NMU International Students.................................... 47

Bringing Your Family with You............................................................................................ 48

NELI Student Pre-Departure and Flight Schedule.................................................................. 49

Arriving in Marquette and Northern Michigan University....................................................... 49

Airport Pick-Up and Bedding............................................................................................. 50

Travel While in the U.S....................................................................................................... 50

Things to Report to NMU’s International Program Office (IPO).............................................. 51

 

LIFE AT NMU AND MARQUETTE

Housing........................................................................................................................... 53

Food.............................................................................................................................. 53

Temporary Housing.......................................................................................................... 54

Off-Campus Housing......................................................................................................... 54

Meal Plans....................................................................................................................... 54

The WILDCAT Express Card................................................................................................ 55

Transportation................................................................................................................ 56

Climate in Marquette........................................................................................................ 56

Banks in Marquette.......................................................................................................... 58

Cell Phone Use While at NMU............................................................................................. 55

Health............................................................................................................................ 60

Physical Education Instruction Facility (PEIF)....................................................................... 61

The U.S. Legal System....................................................................................................... 61

Security in Marquette and on NMU’s Campus...................................................................... 62

Carrying Weapons on Campus........................................................................................... 62

CULTURAL INFORMATION

Culture Shock.................................................................................................................. 64

Religious Freedom........................................................................................................... 66

Prayer Room.................................................................................................................. 66

American Holidays........................................................................................................... 67

Time Zones and Daylight Saving Time................................................................................... 68

Conversions.................................................................................................................... 69

 


ABBREVIATIONS USED IN THIS HANDBOOK

           

NELI: Northern’s English Language Institute

 

NMU: Northern Michigan University  

               

Northern: Northern Michigan University

 

IPO: International Programs Office

 

 

 

 

ALL ABOUT

NELI

 

 

INTRODUCTION TO NELI

 

The NELI Program prepares non-native English speakers to use English effectively in their university study and/or careers. The classes offer an immersion and communicative approach to language learning – as well as formal academic teaching. Whenever possible, students participate in activities that simulate contexts they will experience in their future academic and/or professional environments.

 

The NELI academic year is divided into five (5) Blocks or session. Each Block is seven (7) weeks long. Additionally, there are two weeks of elective courses during the year.* For the 2013/2014 academic year, the dates are as follows:

August 26 – October 18

October 21 – December 13*

January 13 – February 28

March 10 – May 3*

May 19 – July 4

 

* These two sessions include an additional one-week elective course at the beginning of the session.


CLASS LEVELS & CONTACT HOURS

 

The NELI Program has six proficiency levels:

 
  • Early Beginner
  • Beginner
  • Early Intermediate
  • Intermediate
  • Early Advanced
  • Advanced
 

 

Additionally, the NELI Program offers a Pre-Beginner Course and a Bridge Program Course:

  • Pre-Beginner phonetics course (sounds and symbols of Standard American English): This is a two credit-hour course. 

 

  • One-On-One Tutoring course: This course may be required for some students and can be taken as an elective by other students. This is a one credit-hour course.

 

  • Dual Enrollment Course: This course is for students who do not score high enough on the MELAB to matriculate into credit-bearing courses at NMU. This is a two credit-hour course.

 

Each level includes three courses:

  • Reading and Writing
  • Listening and Speaking
  • Grammar and Language Applications

 

Each Block is three credit hours, which equals six credits per semester. Each Block includes three core courses. Each course meets for 1 hour, five days a week, Monday – Friday.

 

CONTACT HOURS:  Students receive a minimum of 20.5 contact hours per week with their courses a NELI instructor, trained language tutors, and the NELI Coordinator

 

COURSE PROGRAM OVERVIEW

 

Northern’s English Language Institute offers a Course Program that a minimum of 20.5 contact hours in order to provide exceptional teaching and excellent learning situations for all NELI students.

 

In addition to the six proficiency levels described on page 8, the NELI program includes the following components:

 

The following components are required by all students in the NELI program:

 

  • Cultural Interaction Components
    • Attending social activities within the NELI Program: This includes the following but is not limited to the following:
      • Fall Picnic
      • Dinners put on by the coordinator
      • Other events: Students always will be notified far enough in advance to plan accordingly

 

  • Language Lab Components
    • Every student spends a minimum of one hour per week in the Language Lab working on any of the three academic components.
    • Students may use the American Speechsounds Software on one of the three mobile devices designated for NELI students only – or students may work with a tutor.

 

  • Individualized Instruction Components
    • Every student spends a minimum of one hour per week with an instructor working on academic components outside of class time.
    • This can be during a designated Individualized Instruction Time or during one of the instructor’s office hours.

 

  • Conversation Mentors
    • Once every two weeks, every student meets with a conversation mentor in one of three locations for two hours. Students are notified of the time and place at orientation.

 

  • Team Teaching
    • Every week, every student meets with all NELI students and instructors for three hours of team teaching.
    • Team teaching may include taking the bus system to learn the route, watching a movie and writing an essay or a paper on the movie, working on PowerPoint presentations, etc.

 

  • Elective Course
    • Between each seven-week session during Fall and Winter, NELI offers a one-week elective course. These elective week courses are graded just as the regular core courses. Attendance, assignments, etc. (all in the “Rules and Requirements for NELI Students”) apply to the Elective Course.

Attendance at three, six-credit hour classes, Team Teaching, the Elective Course – and – all of the above Components ARE REQUIRED. Missing any one of these components will affect a student’s grade negatively.  Please see the “Rules and Requirements for NELI Students” for more information (page 18).

 

 

OVERVIEW OF NELI CURRICULAR LEVELS - Benchmarks

 

Level 1A – Early Beginner

 

Students will work directly with their instructors on the following: Students will begin by making picture/word connections, then move to reading simple sentences in Standard American English. Students will also begin to familiarize themselves with correct word forms/word order. Students will learn to identify the main idea and details of any assignment and develop spoken accuracy through vocabulary study and brief oral presentations.  Students will learn to take notes and respond to simple conversations. Through in-class participation and selected campus activities, students will apply their language skills within everyday interaction in campus settings Additionally, it is expected that students will work on these areas outside of class.

 

Level 1B – Beginner

 

Students will work directly with their instructors on the following: Students will increase their vocabulary, begin to focus on an academic vocabulary, and improve comprehension of short readings. Students will continue to improve pronunciation and intonation, focus on self-expression, and learn to identify and address areas of difficulty. Through in-class participation and selected campus activities, students will apply their language skills within everyday interaction in campus settings. Additionally, it is expected that students will work on these areas outside of class. At this level, students will be preparing for the MELAB test through their course work.

 

Level 2A – Early Intermediate

 

Students will work directly with their instructors on the following: Students will begin pre-writing techniques that will lead to sound academic writing. Students will begin to analyze readings, understand complex sentence patterns, begin development of paragraph structure, and increase academic vocabulary through listening to lectures, radio programs, reading newspapers, and academic texts. Additionally, it is expected that students will work on these areas outside of class. Through in-class participation and selected campus activities, students will apply their language skills within everyday interaction in campus settings At this level, students will be preparing for the MELAB test through their course work.

 

Level 2B – Intermediate

 

Students will work directly with their instructors on the following: Students will begin pre-writing techniques, study rhetorical patterns, learn how to read and write using critical thinking skills, focus on self-expression to communicate with peers, tutors, and conversation partners. Students will begin writing stories and focus on academic writing. Students will begin development of paragraph structure and examine grammar within an academic context and general interest contexts. Students will also develop self-instruction patterns for problem solving. Through in-class participation and selected campus activities, students will apply their language skills within everyday interaction in campus settings. Additionally, it is expected that students will work on these areas outside of class. At this level, students will be preparing for the MELAB test through their course work.

 

Level 3A – Early Advanced

 

Students will work directly with their instructors on the following: Students will begin to work on essay structure, thesis statements, more complicated rhetorical patterns, and source assessment (including online sources). Students will begin to identify cultural purposes of idiomatic speech. Students may be able to participate in an approved practicum program for 1-2 hours per week with the NELI Coordinator by working on the NELI Newsletter and interviewing individuals. Students will begin to ready themselves for university admission. Additionally, it is expected that students will work on these areas outside of class. Through in-class participation and selected campus activities, students will apply their language skills within everyday interaction in campus settings .At this level, students will be preparing for the MELAB test through their course work.

 

Level 3B - Advanced

 

Students will work directly with their instructors on the following: Students will focus on advanced reading, writing, listening, speaking, vocabulary, and grammar development. Students will engage with others in the university, present an oral and PowerPoint presentation, and have the option to submit an academic writing piece to a journal by working with the NELI Coordinator. Students may be able to network with international students from other universities. Additionally, it is expected that students will work on these areas outside of class. Through in-class participation and selected campus activities, students will apply their language skills within everyday interaction in campus settings. At this level, students will be preparing for the MELAB test through their course work.

 

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Below are the course descriptions for the NELI Program at Northern Michigan University, which can be used as benchmarks:

READING AND WRITING: NELI Course Descriptions


ELI 061A – Early Beginner Reading and Writing: 7-Week Session/6 credit hours
This course focuses on vocabulary development and basic comprehension of ideas from simple sentences to groups of sentences written in standard American English. The goals of this course are to help students to read simple sentences in standard American English and become familiar with correct word forms and word order. Students will improve comprehension of ideas in short readings of paragraph length and develop vocabulary skills. Students will receive focused practice in the association of sound and meaning and will write simple sentences, and will work toward comprehension of ideas in short readings of short paragraphs. Course may be repeated. (Pass/No Pass)

ELI 061B – Beginner Reading and Writing: 7-Week Session/6 credit hours
This course focuses on continuing vocabulary development and reading comprehension, understanding phrases rather than individual words, and practicing basic writing skills. Students will continue to improve comprehension of ideas in short readings of paragraph length and increase vocabulary skills. Students will identify parts of a sentence, work towards identifying the main idea of a paragraph, and write short summaries. At this level, students will be preparing for the reading and writing portion of the MELAB test through their course work. Course may be repeated. (Pass/No Pass)

ELI 062A – Early Intermediate Reading and Writing: 7-Week Session/6 credit hours
This course focuses on developing reading comprehension in longer and more complex readings than in ELI 062B. The goals of this course are to help students analyze readings to identify the main idea, supporting statements, and author purpose and write responses to these criteria. Students will learn to understand complex sentence patterns, write compound sentences, develop writing fluency at the sentence and paragraph level, and write clear responses to readings. At this level, students will be preparing for the reading and writing portion of the MELAB test through their course work. Course may be repeated. (Pass/No Pass)

ELI 062B – Intermediate Reading and Writing: 7-Week Session/6 credit hours
This course focuses on reading and writing varied and complex sentences, writing effective paragraphs, developing pre-writing techniques including outlining, and understanding and using basic rhetorical patterns. Students will learn critical reading skills, improve their writing skills, and may keep a journal where they will write responses to their readings based on well-developed rhetorical patterns. At this level, students will be preparing for the reading and writing portion of the MELAB test through their course work. Course may be repeated. (Pass/No Pass)

ELI 063A – Early Advanced Reading and Writing: 7-Week Session/6 credit hours
This course focuses on providing students with opportunities to develop fluency in reading and writing expository paragraphs. The goals of this course are to learn essay structure, develop thesis statements, recognize and use more complicated rhetorical patterns, develop strong paragraph organization, and paraphrase and summarize readings. Students will focus on critical reading and source assessment, learn to select written and web-based material for effective study and writing, practice learned strategies while reading various types of written materials (such as newspapers, magazines, schedules, correspondence, literature, etc.), write short essays, and recognize and learn more advanced writing techniques. At this level, students will be preparing for the reading and writing portion of the MELAB test through their course work. Course may be repeated. (Pass/No Pass)

ELI 063B – Advanced Reading and Writing: 7-Week Session/6 credit hours
This course focuses on reading and vocabulary development at an advanced level. Students will learn to identify the types and purposes of selected writings, analyze academic texts to make abstract inferences, write to compare and contrast readings, and write  ‘opinion’ pieces using supporting facts and/or sources, and work on and finish their research paper. Additionally, students may write a piece for a campus or community publication. Students will also work one-on-one with the instructor to identify areas of potential difficulty in reading and/or writing and plan self-assistance strategies with the instructor. At this level, students will be preparing for the reading and writing portion of the MELAB test through their course work. Course may be repeated. (Pass/No Pass)

 

 

LISTENING AND SPEAKING: NELI Course Descriptions


ELI 071A – Early Beginner Listening and Speaking: 7-Week Session/6 credit hours
Students will develop key abilities for listening and speaking English in an academic environment. They will be able to identify main idea and details of any listening assignment. Students will be able to use critical thinking strategies to make predictions about listening tasks. They will learn to state the main idea and give details on given topics. Students will learn to make presentations through note cards and Power Point. They will develop spoken accuracy with oral presentations and intensive vocabulary study. Students will work on pronunciation, word and sentence stress, intonation and music of English language. Course may be repeated. (Pass/No Pass)

ELI 071B – Beginner Listening and Speaking: 7-Week Session/6 credit hours
Students will continue working on developing key abilities for listening and speaking English in an academic environment. Students will continue working on pronunciation and intonation, begin to recognize idiomatic speech; identify linguistic origins of academic vocabulary; identify speaking styles; and identify fact, fiction, and persuasion. Students will develop spoken accuracy with oral recordings, oral presentations, intensive academic vocabulary study, and may attend selected campus activities. Students will apply their language skills to an academic context, campus-setting work, and within everyday interaction. Students will develop practical academic vocabulary, conversational ability, and language for self-instruction and for community-based and web-based research. At this level, students will be preparing for the listening portion of the MELAB test through their course work. Course may be repeated. (Pass/No Pass)

ELI 072A – Early Intermediate Listening and Speaking: 7-Week Session/6 credit hours
Students will focus on increasing academic vocabulary through listening to lectures, discussions, radio talks, news and then using new vocabulary discussions, group work and presentations. In this course, students will also work on speech fluency. They will make at least one presentation. Every student will attend a lecture and take notes at least once a week; every student may then produce an oral summary for class. At this level, students will be preparing for the listening portion of the MELAB test through their course work. Course may be repeated. (Pass/No Pass)

ELI 072B – Intermediate Listening and Speaking: 7-Week Session/6 credit hours
Students will apply their skills to ESL listening and speaking texts level two.  Students will attend lectures to produce oral summaries for the class. Students will learn to listen for tone, stress, rhythm, syllables, authentic pronunciation, and enunciation. Students will work together to make an oral presentation for the campus or community. Students will focus on effective self-expression using English to communicate with American peer mentors, learning about campus culture. Students will apply comprehensive language skills to the immediate setting. Students will analyze linguistic and cultural progress and keep a record of language skills needing adjustment. At this level, students will be preparing for the listening portion of the MELAB test through their course work. Course may be repeated. (Pass/No Pass)

ELI 073A – Early Advanced Listening and Speaking: 7-Week Session/6 credit hours
Students will study third level ESL listening and speech materials in preparation for university admission. Students will identify cultural purposes of stylized and idiomatic speech and present oral summaries. Students will create one power point presentation. Students will attend lectures, review instructional materials for future classes, take sample tests, and keep track of (potential) areas of difficulty. At this level, students will be preparing for the listening portion of the MELAB test through their course work. Course may be repeated. (Pass/No Pass

ELI 073B – Advanced Listening and Speaking: 7-Week Session/6 credit hours
Students begin readying themselves to apply for university admission. Students will make an oral presentation. Students will identify areas of potential difficulty in listening and speaking and plan self-help strategies. At this level, students will be preparing for the listening portion of the MELAB test through their course work. Course may be repeated. (Pass/No Pass)
 

 

GRAMMAR AND LANGUAGE APPLICATIONS: NELI Course Descriptions

ELI 081A – Early Beginner Grammar and Language Applications: 7-Week Session/6 credit hours
Students will study grammar to support previous English as a Foreign Language instruction and begin to develop fluency. Students will apply their language skills in a variety of contexts such as an academic environment, campus settings, and everyday conversation. Through these practical applications, students will begin to acquire the necessary resources for self-instruction and community-based and web-based research. Students will also be asked to consider the relationships between their language and culture of origin and those of America. Course may be repeated. (Pass/No Pass)

ELI 081B – Beginner Grammar and Language Applications: 7-Week Session/6 credit hours
Students will study grammar to build on previous and current English as a Foreign Language instruction, leading to more confident fluency. Students identify and address areas of difficulty, practice editing, and increase their knowledge of English Grammar and American Culture. Students will apply their language skills to an academic context, campus settings, and everyday interaction. Students will develop practical academic vocabulary, conversational ability, and language for self-instruction and community-based and web-based research. Students will also examine the active interrelationships between their language and culture of origin and those of America. At this level, students will be preparing for the MELAB test through their course work. Course may be repeated. (Pass/No Pass)

ELI 082A – Early Intermediate Grammar and Language Applications: 7-Week Session/6 credit hours
Students will study level II ESL grammar texts to improve fluency and accuracy in all language functions.  Students will examine grammar as it occurs in academic texts, general interest publications, news sources, and their own work.  Students will apply comprehensive language skills to the immediate setting through a variety of assignments, such as an interview, a short story, sentences with various themes, etc. Students will analyze linguistic and cultural progress; keep a record of language skills needing adjustment; and develop self-instruction patterns for on-going problem solving.  Students may continue to identify areas of improvement by starting a daily journal. At this level, students will be preparing for the MELAB test through their course work. Course may be repeated. (Pass/No Pass)

ELI 082B – Intermediate Grammar and Language Applications: 7-Week Session/6 credit hours
Students will study level II ESL grammar texts to improve fluency and accuracy in all language functions.  Students will examine grammar as it occurs in academic texts, general interest publications, news sources, and their own work.  Students will apply comprehensive language skills to the immediate setting. Students will continue to keep a record of language skills needing adjustment and develop self-instruction patterns for on-going problem solving. Students may continue to identify areas of improvement by keeping a daily journal.  At this level, students will be preparing for the MELAB test through their course work. Course may be repeated. (Pass/No Pass)

ELI 083A – Early Advanced Grammar and Language Applications: 7-Week Session/6 credit hours
Students will study level III ESL grammar to improve fluency and accuracy in all language functions. Students will examine grammatical variations in English for specific grammar concepts and structures, poetry, and humor.  Students will attend lectures, review instructional materials for future classes, take sample tests, and keep track of (potential) areas of difficulty. Students are required to participate in an approved practicum program 1-2 hours weekly with the NELI Coordinator.  Students begin readying themselves to apply for university admission. At this level, students will be preparing for the MELAB test through their course work. Course may be repeated. (Pass/No Pass)

ELI 083B – Advanced Grammar and Language Applications: 7-Week Session/6 credit hours
Students will build on level III ESL grammar. Students will address any remaining difficulties in their language skills. Students will complete final preparations to apply for university admission.  Students will make an oral presentation and prepare a writing sample for submission to university officials.  Students may have the option to publish portions of their journal. At this level, students will be preparing for the MELAB test through their course work. Course may be repeated. (Pass/No Pass)

 

 

ADDITIONAL COURSES: NELI Course Descriptions


ADDITIONAL COURSES: NELI Course Descriptions
ELI 050 – Pre-Beginner Listening and Speaking: 7-Week Session/2 credit hours
This class prepares students with little to no English speaking ability by focusing on phonics (sounds and symbols). Any student needing to take the pre-beginner course will also enroll in the Level 1A, Early Beginner Course. Students will learn to make the sounds associated with Standard American English and understand the sound/symbol connections in Standard American English. Students will learn to associate pictures to words. Any student needing to take the pre-beginner course will also enroll in the Level 1A, Early Beginner Course.

This course focuses on the pronunciation of American English through intensive practice and involves pronunciation instruction and practice beginning with phonics (sound-symbol correlation). Coursework will include increasing fluency in reception and production, analyzing the sounds of American English, and developing self-monitoring skills. This class is designed to develop and enhance students’ speaking skills in connection with other language skills. Students will work toward achieving the following: Understanding English sounds, making English sounds, acquiring the ability to introduce themselves and others, responding appropriately to common classroom directives, applying knowledge from introductory reading/writing and grammar/language applications to speaking, and reporting events using more than 10 sentences. (Pass/No Pass)

ELI 060 – One-On-One Tutoring: 7-Week Session/1 credit hour
This course is required for beginning students. This course is optional for intermediate and advanced students and may be taken each semester. This course focuses on weak or problem areas in listening/speaking, reading/writing, and/or grammar/language applications. Students will meet with an instructor once a week for one hour to define problem areas, develop practical solutions with the help of the instructor, and work with the instructor on specific assignments/areas. Students may sign up for more than one hour per 7-Week Session. (Pass/No Pass)

090 A & B: University Reading and Advanced Grammar/Vocabulary

This class will involve the following: working with academic vocabulary and critical thinking skills while focusing on academic readings; developing an understanding of citation styles while focusing on discerning audience and intended audiences; developing advanced note taking/study skills; expanding, refining, and applying complex grammar skills used in complex sentence structures in academic writing; reviewing and clarifying troublesome grammar points; and practicing critical reading, editing, and proofreading.

 

091 A & B: University Writing and Advanced Grammar/Vocabulary

This class will involve the following: working with academic vocabulary and critical thinking skills; expanding paragraphs into academic essays with an emphasis on pre-writing, thesis control, essay organization, development, and integration of credible source materials; expanding, refining, and applying complex grammar skills used in complex sentence structures in academic writing; reviewing and clarifying troublesome grammar points; and practicing writing, editing, and proofreading.

 

092 A & B: Studying for the MELAB

This is an intensive English skills development course to help students develop test-taking strategies. This class also strengthens previously-learned skills of reading, listening, speaking, and writing – and advances the following existing strategies: connecting existing language to new information; identifying problems related to structure; applying skimming and scanning reading strategies; listening for key words, making inferences, and identifying main ideas; applying critical thinking skills.

 

093 A & B: Volunteer Experience and Matriculation Preparation

This class may be taken for one seven-week session or two seven-week sessions to provide an individualized focus for the student. Volunteer experience will be gained through two-to-four volunteer hours per week where the student volunteers two to four hours per week through the NMU Center for Student Enrichment Center. Matriculation Preparation will involve researching and declaring academic and/or career goals; expanding self management of university resources and time management; learning to read a course syllabus; learning how to use EduCat; learning how to create a strong resume; and working on any problematic language skills.

 

094: Oral Presentations: Advanced Listening, Speaking, and Presentation Skills

This class will involve the following: teaching students the reasoning behind PowerPoint (PPT) presentations – including audience analysis and audience needs; managing and transferring information between note cards and oral speaking; selecting appropriate content; managing citations in PPTs; managing visual aids; managing time restrictions; and learning about oral delivery: how to make eye contact and present and maintain an appropriate voice level, etc.  A video of the student will be used for teaching/learning purposes.

ELI 095 – Bridge Program Course: 7-Week Session/2 credit hours
Required for some matriculating students into credit-bearing Northern Michigan University courses and may be taken multiple semesters. This course focuses on working with individual students on credit-bearing assignments in any/all classes that require reading, writing, grammar, speaking, and/or listening. Areas of concern for students will be addressed through one-on-one instruction from a NELI instructor. Course time is flexible to fit student’s academic course schedule. (Pass/No Pass)

 

NELI Testing and Placement

 

Step 1:                                                

 

 
 

Student Testing – Orientation

Compass Testing Placement Test

Reading, E-Write, Listening and Speaking

 

Students have two hours to complete the test.

This test begins at 10:00 a.m. – Please do not be late.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 2:

 

 
 

Placement is based on test results

Students are notified of their placed level(s) during student orientation on Friday.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Orientation Testing (If requested by the instructor)

Oral Evaluation

Instructor(s) will interview students individually for 3-5 minutes

 

Writing Test

Timed writing sample on a given topic – 25 minutes

 

 

 

 

Step 3:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 4:

 

 
 

Diagnostic Testing – First Day of Classes

Instructors will determine if any students have demonstrated English proficiency above or below the level in which they are currently placed.

 

If it is decided that a student should be moved to a different level, the student will be contacted by the NELI Coordinator.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eligibility, Probation, and Promotion

  • Students on Probation are not eligible for level changes.
  • To move to a higher level, the student must demonstrate English proficiency above the level he/she is currently in – at the beginning of a session.

 

 

 

 

 

 

COURSEWORK

Homework and work done in class are required.

 

Instructors will grade you on the following:

  • Work done in class
  • Participation in class
  • Tests and quizzes
  • Homework assignment: completion and proficiency
  • Attitude (good or bad) toward other students, toward the instructor(s), and toward the course
  • Behavior (good or bad) toward other students, toward the instructor(s), and toward the course

 

TIPS FOR SUCCESS

 

Attend class every day

  • Read and follow the attendance policy
  • If you have a genuine emergency and must miss class, make up all your in-class work

 

Get to know your instructor

  • Visit your instructor during his/her office hours for extra help on your assignments and learning
  • Ask your instructor questions
  • Ask for help when you need it

 

Make a study plan

  • Daily, weekly, and monthly plans
  • Study every day – even weekends
  • Do not waste time

 

Do your homework

  • Expect homework every day
  • Do it yourself – DO NOT COPY
  • Do it on time – DO NOT BE LATE
  • If you have questions, ask your instructor
 

 

Rules and Requirements for NELI Students

These are Mandatory Requirements

 

As a student in the NELI program, you must adhere to all of the following:

 

 

Attendance

  1. You must attend 85% of your classes and other required attendance:
  1. Accent Reduction Sessions – Two, 30-minute sessions twice a week: You will be notified of the days and times for this as soon I receive the schedule.
  2. Conversation Mentors Meetings – Two hours every other week: Please check your academic schedule for days and places for this. Conversation Mentors always meet on Fridays from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.
  3. Crunch Lunches: You will be notified of the days for these. Lunch will be provided. Please bring your own drink.
  4. Game Time – Once a week: The tutors from the Speech Pathology and Audiology will meet with you once a week. You will be notified of the day and time for every week as soon as I receive the schedule.
  5. Individualized Instruction – One hour per week: You may choose the day and time – and the instructor to see – each week.
  6. Language Lab – One hour per week: You may choose the day and time each week. PLEASE NOTE: If you do not sign in, you will not be counted as attending – and you will earn an absence.
  7. Study Hall – These are assigned: Please check your academic schedule for this information. You must sign in to your study hall time (in my office) – AND – you must sign our of your study hall time (in my office). PLEASE NOTE: If you do not sign in – and sign out – you will not be counted as attending and you will earn an absence

 

If you miss more than eight hours of combined attendance to requirements 1 – 7, above, you will be in danger of losing your F-1 Visa Status. If you miss more than 5 class days of any core class, including the Team Teaching day, you will lose your immigration status.

 

  1. All absences are counted as absences – even if you are sick. If you are sick enough to stay home, then you are sick enough to get a doctor’s note from the NMU Vielmetti Health Center – on campus in Gries Hall. If there are extenuating circumstances, you must see me – and bring doctor excuses, hospitalization proof, etc.
  2. You may miss no more than five days of a class. Otherwise, you will be reported to Angela Maki for immigration removal. If you miss more than five days of a class, you will fail the class. Consequently, you will not be a full-time student and you will lose your immigration status.
  3. You are to return from holidays the week before classes begin. For example, if classes begin for Winter 2014, Block 1 on January 13, you should be back in the country by Thursday, if not sooner: by January 9.  Student Orientation will always be on the Friday before classes begin.

 

Class/Professor Expectations – in the U.S. – and in the NELI Program

It is expected, in the U.S., that each student brings all of his/her textbooks, his/her mobile device, and at least one notebook and pencil to every class.
 

It is expected, in the U.S., that students arrive before class begins. The professor is always in the classroom at least five minutes before class – AND – the students are in the classroom at least five minutes before class.

 

These expectations apply to NELI students. Therefore, your NELI instructors will expect you to be in class before class begins.

 

 

Team Teaching

Team Teaching – Every Friday from 12:40 – 3:40 p.m. Please meet in 142 Whitman. NOTE: You are to bring a notebook and pencil to Team Teaching.   Team Teaching includes three classes where you and all the students will meet together.

 

The same rules that apply to regular class, apply to Team Teaching. In other words, Team Teaching is not a day off from work and paying attention. You must take Team Teaching seriously if you want to pass your courses.

 

If you miss Team Teaching – you earn three absences. Please note – your Team Teaching time will be graded in at least one of your core classes. Team Teaching is not time off; it is a regular class and is counted as three classes.

 

Absences

  1. You may make up work due to an absence only if all of the following criteria are met:
    1. If you will miss a class, you must email your instructor before the class begins. The only exceptions to this include hospitalization or a death in the family. If you are ill, you must get up when your alarm goes off and email your instructors even though you do not feel well.
    2. You must meet with all of your instructors (for classes you missed) the same week as the absence. This cannot be during class. If you cannot find your instructor alone and available during his/her office hours – you must email and ask for an appointment – and meet with your instructors that same week. Do not interrupt another student who is with your instructor during office hours. You must go over the assignment with your instructors in person – and not just ‘pick up’ an assignment from them – or ask them for assignments via email.
    3. Do not ask for this information during class. You must meet with your instructors in their office.
    4. You will receive whatever percentage of the assignment that is stipulated in your class syllabus.
    5. All of your missed work must be turned in within one week (7 days) of your absence
  2. It is not up to your instructors to email you your assignments.
  3. Missing Team Teaching will earn you three absences.
  4. When emailing your instructor, use the following format:

A salutation, for example, Dear Ms. Tiffany,

A complete paragraph with complete sentences – even if it is only one sentence

No slang, no text language, etc. – only formal English

A closing, for example, Best, Aseel

 

Assignments

You are expected to attend class having read all assigned materials and completed all writing assignments. If you attend a class without completing all of your reading and writing assignments, your teacher may require that you leave class: If this happens, you will receive an absence for that day.

 

 

 


Attitude and Demeanor

It is expected that you will be respectful and maintain an appropriate attitude while in the NELI program – toward your instructors, your peers, the NELI Coordinator, visitors, etc. As the NELI Coordinator, I authorize the removal of any students from class or an outing who 1) displays a bad attitude, 2) who talks about inappropriate topics, and/or 3) who uses their cell phone and/or falls asleep (or looks like he/she is falling asleep). Therefore, please make sure that you act appropriately. If you have any questions about what is appropriate – and inappropriate – please ask your instructors during their office hours.

 

Some examples of bad attitudes are as follows: not caring about a project or assignment, complaining about time spent in class, study hall or other requirements, acting sleep in class, not participating in group work, not paying attention to the instructor, getting ready to leave class before class is over, leaving class before class is over, showing racism/rudeness/or arrogance, talking about inappropriate topics.

 

You are responsible for your own attitude. Attending the NELI Program is your job while you are here. We will do our best – and we hope that you will do your best.

 

 

Grades

  • You must receive a minimum of a C grade – 74% – to pass a course.
  • You must retake any course that you fail.

 

 

Tardies

  • If you come to class 1 – 9 minutes late, you will receive one Tardy.
  • Once you earn four Tardies (1-9 minutes late for class) you will earn one Absence
  • If you come to class 10 minutes or more late for class, you will receive one Absence.

 

Probation

If you receive a Probationary Letter, and you fail a class (due to non attendance, poor attitude/being disrespectful, or poor grades), you will be withdrawn from the NELI Program immediately. This is accomplished by the International Program Office Executive Secretary contacting the Border Patrol, who will make sure you obtain a plane ticket and escort you to your plane where you will return to your home country.

 

If you are on probation – and you pass all of your NELI classes and receive required attendance – you will be removed from probation for the next Block.

 

 

Class Syllabus

You are responsible for all the information in every class syllabus for your three classes. Please make sure you read the syllabus from each of your classes completely and understand it completely.

 

 

Tobacco and Alcohol

  • No tobacco – in any form – is allowed in class.
  • If you come to class smelling of alcohol, you will be required to leave class, and you will earn an absence for that day.

 

 

GRADING POLICIES

 

NELI courses require a grade of “C” or higher to pass.  If a student earns a C- or lower grade, that student will fail the course. Students must repeat (and pay tuition for) any class they fail until a passing score is earned.


 

 

 

NELI Attendance and Feedback Form  (EXAMPLE)

 

NELI Attendance and Feedback Form

 

STUDENT NAME

 

Do not write in this space.

 

STUDENT I.D.

 

 

 

CIRCLE SESSION

 

 

FALL

Session 1

 

FALL

Session 2

 

WINTER

Session 3

 

WINTER

Session 4

 

SUMMER

Session 5

 

DATES:

In Attendance

ü

Absent –

Excused:

X

Absent –

Unexcused: O

COMMENTS

Reasoning on Absences

MONDAY

 

 

 

 

TUESDAY

 

 

 

 

WEDNESDAY

 

 

 

 

THURSDAY

 

 

 

 

FRIDAY

 

 

 

 

 

COMMENTS

Please comment on and give me feedback on this student’s skills and learning, attitude, strengths, weaknesses, and alert me to any problems.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                     

 

 

HOW TO ADDRESS YOUR INSTRUCTORS 

IN THE U.S.

 

The instructor-student relationship is a professional relationship. Therefore, you need to address your instructor/professor politely and with respect. Here are some guidelines:

 

Always address your instructor/professor formally. You may use Professor before the names of your instructor, such as Professor Smith. Your instructors may suggest you use Ms. or Mr. – but this is only for the NELI program. While taking credit-bearing classes, please use the term Professor unless told otherwise. Never assume it is okay to use a first name only.

 

Also, if your instructors tell you that you may call them by their first name – but you are uncomfortable with that – continue to use the term Professor. Do not be afraid to ask about the use of names. Just ask politely.


STUDYING EXPECTATIONS IN U.S.  UNIVERSITIES

 

CLASS/PROFESSOR EXPECTATIONS

It is expected, in the U.S., that students bring all of their textbooks, their mobile device, at least one notebook and pencil to every class.

 

It is expected, in the U.S., that students arrive before class begins. The professor is always in the classroom at least five minutes before class – and – the students are in the classroom at least five minutes before class.

 

These expectations apply to NELI students. Therefore, your NELI instructors will expect you to be in class before class begins.

 

ATTENDING CLASS:

You must attend class while you are attending NMU. Your NELI instructors expect you to come to class every day and participate in the class activities and discussions. Poor attendance will lead to a poor grade.

 

Your NELI instructors will contact the NELI Coordinator if you are continually absent or performing poorly in class. Your primary purpose for receiving a U.S. student visa – is to study English in the U.S. The main purpose IS NOT to party, play sports, etc.

 

Classes meet at various times during the week, depending on the assigned credit hours and block formation. For example, your three-credit courses will meet every day, Monday – Friday; a two-credit course may meet once a week for two hours – or twice a week for one hour. You are expected to be able to handle multiple class subjects and projects at the same time.

 

You will be expected to adjust to U.S. time, not nap during the day unless you are ill, study each day between classes and in the evening, and go to bed at a reasonable hour and wake up in time for your first class. It is necessary for you to study on the weekends.

 

 

CLASS EXPECTATIONS:

 

Your class syllabus is the best guide to the expectations for each class. Additionally, the “Rules and Requirements for NELI Students” and the Honor Code are major components to your participation in the NELI program. Study your syllabi and this Student Handbook carefully – and – talk with your instructors to find out what they will expect of you. Most courses in the NELI program are a mixture of lecture, modeling, individual writing and work, group writing and work, participation (on the board and orally), and homework. Additionally, you may be a part of a student presentation and/or group projects.

 

The NELI instructors expect and welcome your questions, as do most university professors. These questions are signs of your active interest in the subject and are not interpreted as a “challenge” to the professor’s authority, as long as they are presented with respect for your instructor (and fellow peers). This may present a different atmosphere and learning style than is found in your native country. It may be difficult for you to learn how to take turns when speaking in class. This is normal.

 

Depending on the professor, your grades are based upon projects, case papers, and exams. All NELI instructors require full class attendance and participation. Missing class will affect your grade and may jeopardize your immigration status.

 

All NELI instructors hold office hours to help you if you are experiencing problems or have questions about the class subject. They may be willing to answer your questions by email – but remember to give them 1-2 days to respond. Instructors are friendly while being professional – and they are quite approachable. Therefore, try to not be shy. Always be respectful.

 

In addition to your instructors and the NELI Coordinator, you may find academic and career advise through NMU’s Academic and Career Advisement Center (ACAC): 3302 Hedgcock (building number 9 on the campus map).

 

Your academic advisor – while you are in the NELI program – is the NELI Coordinator: Dr. Jo Doran. Dr. Doran will play an active role in monitoring your attendance and academic work.  She is the head of the NELI program department, and she will monitor your attendance/academic work to determine your immigration status. Each week, all of your instructors report to Dr. Doran with reports of your attendance, academic work, attitude and behavior, and problems.

 


 

ACADEMIC HONESTY

 

NELI wants to help students understand the standards for academic honesty that are used in most American institutes of higher education, including Northern Michigan University. The NELI rules about academic honesty are the same rules for NMU. Five types of behavior are not acceptable in NELI classes and in NMU classes:


Cheating

Cheating means using information or notes that are not accepted by the teacher during an academic exercise. This means that it is not acceptable to look at another students’ paper during a test, and it is not acceptable to copy answers from another student’s paper – even if that student offers.


 

 

Plagiarism

Plagiarism means using another person’s information and/or ideas. Copying works and/or ideas from books, magazines, and/or from online (the Internet) etc. and not showing that the information came from that source is wrong: It is plagiarism. It is not acceptable to take words and/or ideas from published OR unpublished sources – unless the student shows that the stated information comes from that source – and that the source is credible. A student can take information from a source if the student quotes or paraphrases the information and then cites the source. This means using quotation marks” (“ ”) around the words taken from a source or changing the words – and then stating who gave the information and when and where it was written/published.


Complicity

Complicity means helping another student to commit a dishonest act in class. For example, it is not acceptable to do homework for another student – or to allow another student to copy your work.


Fabrication, Falsification, and Forgery

  • Fabrication means inventing information that is used for an academic assignment. This means it is not acceptable to make up ideas that are used for a class assignment. For example, if the student is asked questions about a topic, that student may not invent the answers to those questions.

 

  • Falsification means changing a grade or score. That means that it is not acceptable to erase a grade or score and write a different one on an academic paper.

 

  • Forgery is imitating another person’s signature. That means that it is not acceptable to write a teacher’s name on a report or letter that the teacher did not sign.

Multiple Submissions

Multiple submission means that a student will hand in the same work for more than one class. For example, if a student writes a paper for one class and receives a grade for this paper, it is not acceptable for that student to turn in this same paper for a different class.


Academic Mobile Device Misuse

Academic mobile device misuse is the use of software to perform work, which the instructor has told the student to do without the assistance of software.

 

If you are not sure about the meaning of these rules, ask your instructor for more information. Your instructor will include teaching/training in plagiarism in class.

 

 

Northern’s English Language Institute (NELI)

 

NELI STUDENT HONOR CODE AGREEMENT

 

Learning English requires work, dedication, and a good attitude. In order to make your time here successful and your interactions with your instructor respectful, we require all ESL students to agree to the following code of behavior:

  1. I have read the “Rules and Regulations for NELI Students” which states that I may lose immigration status if I miss more than 85% of my classes and that I must earn a C grade or higher to pass.
  2. I understand the rules regarding attendance and absences. I understand that I must contact my instructor(s) before my missed class, meet with each instructor privately during office hours the week of my absence to discuss my missed work, and make up all work within one week of my absence.
  3. I understand the consequences of missing classes and required sessions.
  4. I will check my email – every day – for news from my instructors and/or the NELI Coordinator.  I understand it is my responsibility to look for these emails and that I am responsible for the information in the emails.
  5. I will always do all of my homework and come to class prepared. If I am confused by my homework, I will ask my teacher for help instead of not doing the homework.
  6. I will use my assigned study hall times to do my homework – and not surf the Internet nor play on my phone during this time.
  7. I will pay attention and show respect when visiting public places with my instructors. I will not use my cell phone, sleep, act uninterested, etc. during Team Teaching times, whether in the classroom our outside of the classroom. I will respect myself, my teacher, and other students in class. I will not be rude or dismissive.
  8. I will work hard to learn the English language and speak it as often as possible outside of class.
  9. I will always participate positively in classroom activities. This includes group work, individual work, journal work, in-class work, and homework.
  10. I understand that I have obligations outside of class time that include the following:
    • Attend Accent Reduction Sessions, two half-hour sessions per week.
    • Attend Conversation Mentor Sessions, every other week for two hours.
    • Attend Crunch Lunches when scheduled.
    • Attend Game Time when scheduled, unless it conflicts with a class time.
    • Meet with one instructor for at least one hour per week – or two instructors (individually) for at least one-half hour per week.
    • Attend the Language Lab for one hour, minimum, per week and work with a tutor: Sign in each time.
    • Attend Assigned Study Hall Hours, Monday – Thursday and use this time to work on your homework: Sign in and out each time.
  11. I will participate in extracurricular activities.
  12. I will not plagiarize any of my work – and I will always do my own work. If I do not understand what plagiarism is, I will ask my instructor or the NELI Coordinator. If I do not understand the assignment, I will ask my instructor. I will not use Google Translator to write my papers.
  13. I will purchase all the required textbooks for my courses the first day of class. I understand that my grade may suffer if I do not have the books on time.
  14. I will bring any questions or problems I have to my instructor or the NELI Coordinator.
  15. I also understand that if I fail a class, I must retake the class.

 

Please read this agreement carefully. Ask questions of the instructor and/or the Coordinator until you understand all the sentences above. Once you fully understand all of the Honor Code, please print your name, sign your name, enter your NMU IN number, and enter the date – below.

 

Student Name (PRINT):                                                                                               NMU IN:                                               

Student Signature:                                                                                                          Date:                                                     

 

NMU STUDENT CODE INFORMATION

 

The following information is taken from the Northern Michigan University Student Code Handbook. Please refer to this page online for more information: at http://www.nmu.edu/dso/studenthandbook.

 

2.3.2        Alcoholic Beverages: Possession or Use of

No students shall illegally use, possess*, manufacture, or distribute alcoholic   beverages.  No students shall possess*, consume, or use alcohol on University premises except as permitted by University policy.

*Possess:  Under Michigan law it is illegal for anyone under the age of 21 to purchase or attempt to purchase, consume or possess, or have any bodily content of alcohol.

 

2.3.4       Building Security

No students shall prop open or adjust, tamper with, change, interfere with or disable mechanisms that provide security to University buildings, residence halls, and other facilities.

 

2.3.16     Harassment 

No students shall harass any member of the University community. Harassment for the purposes of this regulation shall be defined as verbal, physical, or written behavior which intimidates individuals or groups on any basis including ancestry, race, ethnicity, color, religion or creed, sex or gender, gender identity, gender expression, genetic information, national origin, age, height, weight, marital status, familial status, handicap/disability, sexual orientation, military or veteran status, and interferes with an individual’s participation in the curricular or extracurricular activities of the University.

 

2.3.31      Use of Tobacco Products

No students shall use tobacco products in any facility or vehicle owned or operated, or under control of the University.

 

2.3.7        Dangerous Materials and Open Flame

.01            No students shall, on University premises, possess, store, mix, or experiment with any chemical, explosive or accelerant which may be injurious to the lives and safety of the University community. This regulation shall not apply to faculty-member supervised learning activities.

.02           No students shall use or create an open flame or use live or glowing embers or charcoal on University premises. This regulation shall not apply to faculty-member supervised learning activities.  Requests for exception to this regulation for ceremonial or religious purposes may be made to the Dean of Students or designee.

 

2.3.13      Fire Safety

.01            No students shall disregard a fire alarm signal or refuse to immediately evacuate a building or a section of a building where a fire alarm is sounding.

.02           No students shall ring any bell or operate, trigger, or tamper with any mechanical or electrical fire safety apparatus, except in case of fire.

.03           No students shall operate, tamper with, or discharge any fire extinguishing equipment except for the purpose of extinguishing fires.

 

2.3.33     Weapons

No students shall keep, possess, display, use, or carry any weapon anywhere on the Northern Michigan University campus or field station. In the interpretation and application of this regulation, examples of weapons shall include, but are not limited to, rifles, shotguns, handguns, bows, or other lethal or dangerous devices capable of casting a projectile* by air, gas, explosives, or mechanical means.   No students shall possess other weapons defined as illegal under Michigan law.   *Examples of projectile weapons include, but are not limited to, cross bows, airsoft guns, paintball guns, slingshots, and bb guns.

 

Weapons used for recreational purposes must be registered and stored in the Public Safety and Police Services Office storage facility.  They must be transported directly from the Public Safety and Police Services Office storage facility to points outside the campus and field station of Northern Michigan University, and transported from such points directly back to the Public Safety and Police Services Office storage facility. They must be transported in accordance with Public Safety and Police Services Office instructions, and the weapon or weapons transported must be unloaded, and, when possible, encased, dismantled, or broken down.  


Grade Appeal Process

bubble sheetThe procedure to challenge a grade can be found in the Student Handbook under Section 1.2.1 Student Complaints Concerning Grades – in the Student Handbook (see below). To summarize:

  • Students should first discuss the issue with the faculty member.
  • If not satisfied, they should go to the department head.
  • If not satisfied, they should formally appeal the grade.

Grade appeals must be based on one of the following reasons:

  1. Mathematical error
  2. Rules for assigning grades as described in syllabus were not followed
  3. Graded on some basis other than academic performance
  4. Extenuating circumstances such as illness, incapacity or absences of the instructor generate uncertainty regarding the appropriateness of the grade
  5. Appeal of finding of academic dishonesty

There is always someone on duty during office hours in the Dean of Students Office. You can call or come in and someone will be available to talk about your situation and, if needed, help with your appeal.


Promotion

Students who pass a class (with a grade of C or greater) will be promoted to the next level of that class.

 

Students who fail (with a grade of C- or less) must repeat the course. Students who fail the same class twice may be removed from the NELI program and may have to return to their home country.

 


Probation

NOTE: Full time is participation in two, seven-week sessions at this point and the two elective weeks. If students enroll in the October session, they will still be counted as full time students: This is because they will be counted as enrolled in the January session, also.

 

A student who fails a NELI class or fails to meet the attendance policy will be put on probation for the next session. To be removed from probation, the student must pass all classes.

 

Students on Probation will not be able to receive a travel signature on their I-20 Form until the final progress report becomes available on the last day of the session.

 

DISABILITY SERVICES FOR STUDENTS

 

Students with documented disabilities may be eligible for academic accommodations. Disability Services provides appropriate and reasonable accommodations to students with disabilities so they may have an equal educational opportunity. 

 

The process of determining whether a student is eligible for accommodations is a collaborative one.  Students are encouraged to submit documentation that describes the current impact of their condition and its relevance to an academic setting. 

 

All students requesting accommodations for the first time must meet with NMU’s Coordinator of Disability Services to begin a discussion regarding what accommodations would be appropriate and reasonable for the individual and the institution.

 

Service and assistance is provided to enrolled students who are temporarily or permanently disabled.

 

To request accommodations, obtain current or recent documentation of your disability and complete the online form at http://www.nmu.edu/disabilityservices/node/2

 

If you have grounds for a documented disability, please talk to your NELI instructors and the Office of Disability Service, which is located at 2001 B.C. Hedgcock. The phone number for the Office of Disability Service is 906.227.1700.


 FIRE SAFETY  & EMERGENCY PROCEDURES

Fire safety is a top priority of NMU. Please refer to the following URL for this information:

Policy

When a fire alarm sounds, all personnel must evacuate the building immediately and move away from the exit door. With the exception of Fire Department personnel and Public Safety Officers, no one is allowed to enter the building until notification has been given by a representative of Public Safety that it is safe to re-enter. If a fire alarm is silenced, this is not an indicator that it is safe to re-enter the building.

Please refer to the following URL for more detailed information on NMU fire safety and emergency procedures: http://www.nmu.edu/publicsafety/node/46

 

 

Online Academic Resource and Services

NMU IN: NMU Identification Number
Each NMU student is given NMU IN. This is your identification number while you study at NELI and NMU. You need this number to access a variety of campus services. 

MyNMU
This is where you can access to your NMU email account, register for NELI classes, check your grades, change your local address (if you move to another place), and check other personal information.


Mobile Device from Northern Michigan University

All NELI students are assigned their own mobile device by the university. You need to pick up a mobile device once you register for NELI class: Mobile device access via your assigned mobile device is a requirement of NELI students. You can pick up your mobile device at the Superior Dome.

NOTE: Once you complete the NELI program – if you do not plan to continue your education at NMU – you MUST return your mobile device to NMU. Please go to http://it.nmu.edu/notebook for more information.

 

 

 

RESOURCES

 

NELI offers a varied list of resources for students

as described below

PROGRAM PICNICS

The NELI program and the International Programs Office (IPO) put on a picnic twice a year. The first picnic is the first Friday in September. The second picnic is the last Friday in April. All of our international students and our NELI students participate in meeting and making friends, playing Frisbee or football, and – of course – eating a lot of food!

 

These are great times. You will see some of the photographs taken during these picnics on our website in the near future. In addition, members of NMU’s academic community come, meet our students, and share their time.

 

LANGUAGE PARTNERS

The NELI Coordinator will pair new NELI students with an NMU student who is screened and interviewed. As a NELI student, you will meet with your Language Partner during Student Orientation – or the first week of class.

 

The purpose of having a Language Partner is to offer help to each incoming NELI student to transition to a new culture. We understand it can be lonely and scary, coming from your home country and leaving your family behind. Having a language partner with whom you can get together with during the week and/or call on the phone helps immensely. It also offers our NELI students a chance to practice using English and share the value of their own culture while they learn about U.S. culture.

 

GAME TIME

Once a week, all of our NELI students meet with two tutors from the Speech Pathology and Audiology department at NMU to play board games. These times provide positive experiences in meeting and making friends and chances to practice using English.

 

SOCIAL DINNERS

NELI offers informal dinners, usually pizza parties, for the NELI students where the instructors and coordinator invite faculty members, administration, or members of the community to meet and visit with the NELI students.

 

CRUNCH LUNCHES

NELI students often struggle with acquiring new sleep habits in adjusting to the time change, learning how to find answers to personal questions, finding new friends, etc. Crunch Lunch offers a once-a-month lunchtime where a speaker from NMU speaks to NELI students about issues such as insomnia (health representative), homesickness (counseling representative), etc. Lunch is provided.

 

INDIVIDUALIZED INSTRUCTION

The NELI program realizes the importance of individualized instruction. While such instruction takes time to set up, the NELI coordinator organizes any available instructor time so NELI students can receive one-on-one help from an instructor throughout the week.

 

 

LANGUAGE LAB

NMU’s Language Lab is a very short walk from the NELI program’s home: Whitman Hall. The Language Lab offers free tutoring, one-on-one or group tutoring, by trained tutors. Additionally, NELI provides three designated mobile devices with pronunciation software for NELI student use. No appointment is necessary, but appointments can be made by calling or stopping in the lab.

 

CONVERSATION MENTORS

NMU Alumni, members of the community, and IPO representatives volunteer two hours every other week to meet with the NELI students for conversation time. This is an informal time with topics chosen based on questions asked by the NELI students. Cookies and coffee are provided.

 

TEAM TEACHING

Team Teaching A: Every week, NELI students meet with three to four instructors for a single class that includes projects related to reading and writing, listening and speaking, and grammar and language applications. This offers students a chance to share ideas, receive peer review feedback, and see what other students are doing in class, etc. while they continue to focus on their learning for the day.

 

Team teaching may include special events, such as the following:

  • Learning the Marquette bus system (MARQ-TRAN) to get around town, shopping at the local food co-op, and learning how to make change
  • Visiting the local museum for lessons in history, where local volunteers dress up in clothing from the specific era
  • Going on a picnic to one of Marquette’s many parks to discuss the climate and health issues/needs of NMU students during the four seasons
  • Giving a PowerPoint presentation to members of the program based on cultural traditions of each student. Students may dress in traditional clothing from their country during these presentations.

All Team Teaching sessions focus on pedagogy and result in required academic responses for all students based on teacher assignments associated with team teaching events.

 

TESTING

&

ADMITTANCE

INTO NMU

 

ENGLISH PROFICIENCY

 

 

NMU requires the following minimum test scores for admittance into NMU:

  • 69 on the MELAB
  • 61 on the Internet-based TOEFL (iBT)
  • 173 on the TOEFL mobile device-based test
  • 500 on the paper-based TOEFL (www.toefl.org)
  • 6.0 on the IELTS

 

 

MELAB

 

The Executive Secretary in the International Programs Office (IPO), Angela Maki (2010 Hedgcock), offers the MELAB test every month. Students are able to take the MELAB every other month. The cost for the MELAB test is $120.

A MELAB score of 69 is required to matriculate into NMU. All of the NELI courses prepare students to take the MELAB test.

If a student scores below the required 69 score – but is close to the score – that student may be eligible for the Bridge Course and may be approved for the transition program for NMU admittance to a credit-bearing classes and a degree program.

 

TOEFL

 

A TOEFL test may be taken instead of the MELAB test for matriculation into NMU. A TOEFL iBT score of 61 is required for matriculation into NMU. Alternately, a student may take the TOEFL mobile device-based test. The requirement for this test is 173 points. The TOEFL is not offered at NMU. The closest test center is Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, which is approximately three hours east of Marquette, MI.

 

Sault Ste Marie - 2302

Lake Superior State University
650 W. Easterday Ave.
United States Of America
49783
906.635.6228

NELI offers a one-week elective course on how to take the TOEFL. Additionally, advanced students may sign up for a one-session course on how to take the TOEFL.

 

 

TUITION  &

FINANCIAL

INFORMATION
NELI Tuition

 

Two, Seven-Week (with 1 Elective Week) Session Expenses  

(2013-14 costs):
 

Tuition and fees

$7,057

Room and Board

$4,348

Books and Supplies

$400

Health Insurance (required)

$827

Personal/Travel

$925

Certification of Finances Amount

$13,557

 

 

Four, Seven-Week (with 2 Elective Weeks) Session Expenses

(2013-14 costs):

 

Tuition and Fees

 

$14,113

Room and Board

$8,696

Books and Supplies

$800

Health Insurance (required)

$1,478

Personal/Travel

$1,850

Certification of Finances Amount

$26,937

 
 

Students will pay a one-time athletic fee of $225 that permits access to all games on campus – including hockey. Attending sports events is an excellent way to meet people!

NMU may be able to offer a scholarship to help with your tuition. Please ask Dr. Doran or Angela Maki about this.


PAYING YOUR BILLS  & PAYMENT PLANS

 

Payment Plans
Northern Michigan University offers three options for the payment of tuition, fees, and housing charges. The options are designed to assist students and their families meet their financial obligations to the university by the required tuition and fees due dates.

Unless the Easy Play Plan or Deferral Payment Plan is selected by the due date, students will be responsible for paying tuition, fees, and housing payments, less applicable aid awards, in full by the tuition due date.

A late fee of $100 per semester will be assessed for tuition and fee payments that are not received by the tuition due date.

Easy Pay Plan
This payment option allows NMU bills to be paid monthly scheduled payments. There is a $50 service charge each semester. Student must sign up for the service through their NMU e-bill account.

For more information, please go to http://www.nmu.edu/studentservicecenter/node/9.

TRANSFERRING MONEY TO 

NORTHERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

 

It can be difficult and time consuming to convert foreign checks and currencies into U.S. dollars once you arrive in the U.S. It is also expensive! Plan to travel with a major credit card, traveler’s checks, or U.S. cash to purchase a week’s worth of meals and personal expenses. You may wish to increase a purchase limit on your credit card.

 

You may pay for most of your expense at NMU with a major credit card or ATM Debit Card (drawn on a U.S. bank only). NMU accepts Visa and MasterCard.

 

The IPO office can help you arrange payment if you send your card type, card number, expiration date, and the name as it appears on the credit card account. You must also include your signature on the request.

 

You ay wish to transfer funds to your student account by wire transfer. The following information must be included in the wire:

  • Your LAST name, First name, (and middle initial, if any)
  • Your NMU identity number (an 8-digit number which usually begins with “00” (include the above information on the Originator to Beneficiary Info field for reference to NMU
  • The $ amount of the wire transfer
  • YOUR bank’s (sending) routing number
  • YOUR bank’s (sending) Federal Reference Number
  • The NMU Bank Account Number: 4496874892
  • The Wells Fargo Bank routing number: 121000248
  • Reference: Attn. (Name of Bank) and “TO” Northern Michigan University

 

NMUU process wire transfers through the Wells Fargo Bank. The money is deposited directly into Northern’s account. In the “Originator to Beneficiary Info” field, please include your name and NMU IN# and the funds will be posted to your NMU student account.

 

Additionally, you may wish to check on the progress of your transfer. The bank information will help:

 

Wells Fargo Bank

First National Bank of Marquette

101 West Washington Street

Marquette, Michigan 49855 USA

Wire Transfer Routing Number: 121999248          Routing Number 091-101-455

Phone:                    1.906.228.1432 (Main Bank Office

FAX:                          1.906.225.6821

 

 

NMU STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE

 

Frequently asked questions:

 

  • Is there a deductible?

Yes, there is a $150.00 deductible per injury or sickness. You can avoid incurring the deductible by utilizing the services of the NMU Health Center. For example, if you get the flu and you go to the NMU health center, there is no deductible.

 

  • Does the plan cover routine visits?

No. The plan is an accident and sickness plan.

 

  • Can I go to any doctor or hospital?

Yes, but you should first utilize the NMU Health Center when it is open.

 

  • Can I cancel my coverage and get a refund?

Non-immigrant Foreign Nations leaving the North American Continent permanently can request a pre-rata refund in writing. Departure documentation is required.

 

  • What is considered a pre-existing condition?

Any condition that originates, is diagnosed, treated, or recommended for treatment within the 6 months immediately before your effective date of coverage is a pre-existing condition. These conditions are not covered until a person has been insured under the NMU student insurance policy for a minimum of 12 consecutive months.

 

  • Does this insurance cover me anywhere in the world?

Yes. You are covered 24 hours a day, anywhere in the world.

 

  • How do I file a claim?

You can file your claim online at www.BolingerColleges.com/NMUobtain

Print and submit your claim form. Then attach all doctor and hospital bills and sent to the following:

 

Bollinger

P.O. Box 727

Short Hills, NJ 07078

 

  • Will I receive an ID card?

Yes. They will be sent to the IPO. You will be informed when your card arrives, and you may pick it up from the IPO office or it will be mailed to you.

 

  • What are the maximum benefits of the plan?

Each eligible injury or sickness is covered to a maximum of $100,000.

 

  • Are there outpatient benefits, if I just have a cold, for example?

Yes. We strongly recommend that you use the services of the NMU Health Center whenever possible. If you are referred by the Health Center to other providers, you can avoid incurring the $150.00 deductible.

 

HELPFUL HINTS ABOUT HEALTH

 

If you have a life-threatening situation, call the emergency telephone number 911, or go directly to the Marquette General Hospital Emergency Department.

 

However – if your situation is not serious, such as a common cold, visit the NMU Health Center during the week or the Medical Center on the weekends.

 

YOU NEED TO CARRY YOUR HEALTH INSURANCE CARD WITH YOU AT ALL TIMES.

This will help you to get the insurance coverage you paid for. The NMU Health Center is the cheapest place to go see a doctor. The second cheapest place Is the Peninsula Medical Center. The Marquette General Hospital is the most expensive.

 

NORTHERN MICHIGAN UNVIERSITY’S VIELMETTI HEALTH CENTER – ON CAMPUS IN GRIES HALL

This health center provides medical services to all NMU students and families for a reasonable cost. Your health insurance policy can be used here.

 

You must go here to turn in all of your medical records and proof of Measles Immunization. Many students also need to get a TB test.

 

So, if you have a cold, earache, sore throat, stomachache, sprained ankle, or an infection – GO TO THE NMU HEALTH CENTER in Gries Hall.

 

Hours, Phone Number and URL:

Monday – Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

906.227.2355

www.nmu.edu/healthcenter

 

Marquette’s Peninsula Medical Center Superior Walk in – Near Campus on Fair Avenue

This medical center provides medical services to all Marquette residents for a reasonable cost. Your health insurance policy may be used, but individuals are required to pay first; they will then be reimbursed. They treat many of the same basic illnesses that the NMU Health Center treats.

 

This medical center is open 365 days a year from 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p. Call 906.226.2233 for more information or visit the web at superiorwalkincenter.com Marquette General Hospital (MGH) – near campus on College Street

This hospital provides emergency medical services to all Marquette area residents. Your health insurance may cover some of the costs of treatment at this hospital, but you will be required to cover all additional expenses. This is where you will be taken if you call 911 and are picked up by an ambulance. The hospital gives x-rays and other tests that require extensive machinery and equipment. You will go to the hospital if you break a bone (and need a cast) or need additional TB testing. Please go to the hospital’s website for more information about their services: www.mgh.org

 

Questions?

If you have questions about when to go where for medical treatment or how to file your insurance forms, please call the IPO.  We are happy to help you while you are in Marquette, MI.

NMU’s COUNSELING SERVICES

ON CAMPUS IN HEDGCOCK STUDENT SERVICES CENTER

 

This counseling center provides consultations to all NMU students free of charge. If you are depressed or suicidal and need someone to talk to, contact them:

906.227.1103

Monday – Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.


Continuing your education at

Northern Michigan University after NELI

Applying to NMU
After completion of NELI, you may apply to Northern Michigan University to seek a degree. In order to be admitted by NMU, you still have to take the English proficiency test. Completion of NELI does not guarantee admittance to an NMU degree seeking status. You have three test options:

NAME OF TEST

REQUIRED TEST SCORE

TOEFL

CTB 173
iBT61
PBT500

IELTS

6 or higher

MELAB

69 or higher

 

Pease go to http://www.nmu.edu/internationalprograms/node/203 for admissions to NMU.


INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS AT NMU

 

Northern Michigan University has over 9,000 students – and this includes over 110 international students. We have students from 28 different countries at NMU.

 

The NELI program and coordinator works closely with the International Programs Office to provide opportunities for all NELI students and all international students to socialize together – through planned social events and academic events.

 

Both the NELI program and the International Programs Office are very active and involved within the NMU community – and the local community – to provide various beneficial contexts and experiences for all international students.

 

We also provide opportunities for both internships and academic service learning for international students – including advanced NELI students. Academic service learning offers real-world situations for students to work with non-profit organizations. In these instructor-monitored contexts, students are able to work with real clients to gain experience that will help them in their careers.

 

 

 

 

 

Immigration

Information

 

 

Helpful Terms You Should Know

International Programs Office (IPO):

The International Programs Office assists international students, including NELI students, in their academic, research, cultural, and immigration concerns as well as general questions. If you have questions about immigration, always go to the IPO office: 2101 Hedgcock Hall, 906.227.2510.  Additionally, please refer to the U.S. Department of State site: http://travel.state.gov/visa/temp/info/info_1298.html

 

Form I-20
If you are studying in the NELI program with an F-1 student visa, you must have the I-20 Form. This form is used to obtain an F-1 visa and to enter the U.S. with F-1 status. DO NOT LOSE THIS FORM while you study at NELI. Additionally, if your I-20 is close to expiring but you need to continue in the NELI program, you must contact the IPO as soon as possible: YOU CANNOT LEGALLY STAY IN THE U.S. WITH AN EXPIRED I-20.  At the Port of Entry, you will no longer get a stamp on your I-20.

 

Form DS-2019
If you are studying in the NELI program with a J-1 student visa, or as an “exchange student,” you must have the DS-2019 Form. This form is used to obtain a J-1 visa and to enter the U.S. in J-1 status. DO NOT lose this form while you study at NELI. At the Port of Entry, you will no longer get stamp on your DS-2019.

 

Form I-94
Once you arrive at NMU, you must meet with the IPO staff to access to your electric I-94 form. This form is your entry record to the U.S. for non-immigrants. You no longer receive a physical I-94 form on the airplane or when you cross the U.S.-Canada border.

 

Visa
A U.S. visa is a person’s passport that gives that foreign citizen permission to apply to enter the U.S. A visa by itself does not authorize entry to the U.S.

 

There are two types of student visas:

  • Student Visa (F-1): Most international students at NMU are under this immigration classification, which means they have been admitted to travel to the U.S. for the purpose of full-time study, have demonstrated financial resources for the entire academic programs, and have a permanent residence abroad that they have no intention of abandoning.
  • Exchange Visitor (J-1): There are many J-1 “categories,” one of which is the Student Category. J-1 is reserved for individuals who participate in an academic exchange between NMU and a university program abroad or who are funded by an international organization, the U.S. or foreign government, or a private agency in support of international education.

 

Dependent (Spouse and/or Unmarried Children) Visas:

  • Dependent (of F-2 Visa Holder): A dependent spouses and unmarried children (under the age of 18) of an F-1 holder can apply for an F-2 Visa: Under this visa, the dependent spouse is permitted to attend a college/university only to the extent that it is “vocational or recreational.” Children under the age of 18 can attend K-12 schools as full-time students. However, such children CANNOT attend a college or a university with an F-2 visa. An individual who holds an F-2 visa is NOT allowed to work in the U.S.
  • Dependent (of J-2 Visa Holder): A dependent spouse and unmarried children (under the age of 18) of a J-2 visa holder can apply for a J-2 visa. Once the dependent spouse receives a J-2 visa, he/she may seek employment in the U.S. by filing a petition to the U.S. government. There is no regulation/restrictions regarding J-2 holders attending any type of educational institutions.

Reinstatement: An F-1 student who has failed to maintain F-1 student status may apply for reinstatement with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS). The student should see the IPO immediately if they become “out of status.”

Department of Homeland Security (DHS): This is the U.S. government department responsible for most areas of national security, including all areas related to foreign visitors in the U.S.

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS): This is a branch of the DHS. USCIS is primarily responsible for handling immigration benefits, such as application for work permits, green cards, and citizenship.

Student Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS): This is a database used by the DHS to collect, track, and monitor information regarding exchange visitors, international students, and scholars who enter the U.S. on F, M or J Visas.

Fee for I-901 SEVIS

All NELI students have to pay this fee in order to apply for their visa. The cost is as follows:

For F-1 Students: $200
For J-1 Students: $180

You need to pay this fee before you go to a U.S. embassy in your country to have an interview for obtaining your F-1 or J-1 visa.

If you are a citizen of Canada, Bermuda, or the Bahamas or a resident of certain other islands wishing to apply for F-1 or J-1 status at a Port of Entry into the United States, you must pay and process the SEVIS fee before appearing at the port of Entry. Please go to http://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?c=ecfr&SID=223398acc19ca8131a2abdd3b7e4dcc1&rgn=div8&view=text&node=8:1.0.1.2.15.0.1.2&idno=8 for more details.

You have three options when paying the SEVIS fee:

  • Through the Internet at www.FMJFee.com by using a credit card (Visa, Master Card, American Express) or Debit/Check Card (Visa and Master Card) and by completing the online I-901 Form (Fee for Remittance for Certain F and J Non-Immigrants)
  • By submitting a completed I-901 Form and a check or money order from a U.S. Bank payable in U.S. currency or by a third party such as NMU or your sponsor
  • By visiting a Western Union Quick Pay location and wiring the money
  • Please go to the following link for more information on the SEVIS I-901 Fee: http://www.ice.gov/sevis/i901/

 

 

U.S. Immigration Rules & Regulations for NELI Students
How to maintain your NELI Student Status


Students MUST do the following:

(NOTE: IPO stands for International Programs Office, 2101 Hedgcock)

  1. You must have and maintain a valid passport at all times.
  2. You must have a valid, unexpired I-20 or DS-2019 at all times.
  3. Once you meet with the IPO staff, your I-94 (a non-immigration Record Form) will be on file with the IPO office. If you have a copy of this form, you must keep it secure at all times. 
  4. You must register and attend all NELI classes on a full-time basis. This means you must attend at least 80% of combined classes and components each session. See Attendance Information in this handbook, pages 16-17 – and see Course Program Overview in this handbook, page 9.
  5. You can only sign up for NELI classes at Northern Michigan University (The only exception for this if you are accepted into the NELI Bridge program and into NMU’s Transition Program.)
  6. If you change your address at Northern Michigan University, you must notify the IPO within 5 days of that change.
  7. If you change your name, you must notify IPO.
  8. Before the expiration date on your I-20, you must apply for an extension with IPO.
  9. You must notify the IPO if your funding changes. For example, if your funding changes from parents to scholarship, and you must request a new I-20 or DS-2019.
  10. Always meet with Angela Maki, Tony Tollefson, or Kevin Timlin – in IPO – before traveling outside the U.S.
  11. If you want to bring your family to the U.S. on an F-2 or J-2 visa: visa for dependents, please see the IPO.
  12. You are NOT allowed to work OFF-campus. Only F-1 students who maintain their F-1 status are allowed to work ON-campus: up to 20 hours per week when they are studying. During your vacation term and winter closure, you may work full-time on campus. J-1 students may only work with advance authorization from their J-1 program sponsor.
  13. If you want to transfer to another school, you must talk to IPO office (Angela Maki or Kevin Timlin) and the NELI Coordinator before you make plans to transfer.
  14. If you need to withdraw from classes, or are asked to leave the NELI Program and NMU, you must report this to IPO immediately. Once you report your intention to withdraw – or if you have been required to leave, contact the IPO before your withdrawal. You will have 15 days before you have to leave the U.S. If you do not report this information to the IPO, you will lose your student status immediately.
  15. The normal time to remain in the U.S. following a degree/program completion is 60 days for F-1 students and 30 days for J-1 students.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

PRINT NAME                                                                                                                                    NMU IN#

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

SIGNATURE                                                                                                                                      DATE                                                                                                                                                    

 

Maintaining your F-1 or J-1 Status

All NELI students who enter the U.S. as F-1 or J-1 students must be full-time students.

NOTE: To maintain your F-1 or J-1 status as a full-time student, you are required to attend all NELI Classes and Components and work consistently for the entire session you are enrolled.

If you fail to make normal progress, you may be considered “out of status” and a reinstatement will be recommended.

Making normal progress is defined by the NELI program as follows:

  • Attending all classes
  • Attending all Components (see Course Program Overview in this Student Handbook, page 9.)
  • Attending all required meetings (such as Conversation Mentors, meetings with the NELI Coordinator and/or instructors, and attending the Language Lab)
  • Preparing carefully for tests
  • Completing homework assignments
  • Making up any and all tests missed because of absences
  • Making up any and all homework missed because of absences
  • Making up any and all in-class work missed because of absences
  • Turning in all assignments on time
  • Coming to class ON TIME: In the U.S., if a class starts at 9:00 a.m., you must be in the classroom by 9:00 a.m. If you come to class more than 5 minutes late – you will be considered late for class.
  • Asking questions in class
  • Seeing Instructors during office hours if you have questions
  • Seeing instructors during office hours when required
  • Abiding by the NELI Attendance Policy, the Honor Code, and the Course Program Overview

 


Employment

F-1 and J-1 students MAY work ON-CAMPUS ONLY. On-campus work is limited to 20 hours per week while school is in session. Employment may be full-time during vacation periods for students who are eligible and intend to register for the next semester.

Off-Campus employment is ILLEGAL for all NELI students – regardless their visa status.

 

 

U.S.  GOVERNMENT  AGENCIES  IMPORTANT TO NMU INTERNATIONAL  STUDENTS

The following U.S. Government Agencies may be helpful to you. If you have difficulty navigating these web sties or understanding what they say, please make an appointment with one of the staff members in the IPO.

USCIS                      U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services                               www.uscis.gov

 

 

 

 

DOS                          Department of State                                                                              www.state.gov

 

                                    Visa Information                                                                                         travel.state.gov

 

 

 

 

DHS                          Department of Homeland Security                                               www.dhs.gov

 

Immigration Information                                  www.dhs.gov/files/immigration.shtm

 

 

 

 

                  DOL                          Department of Labor                                                                              ww.dol.gov

 

                                                      International Labor Affairs                                                                  www.dol.gov/ilab/

 

 

 

 

                  IRS                            Internal Revenue Service                                                                    www.irs.gov      

 

 

If you have questions about FILING A TAX RETURN or a US SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER, please see the NELI Coordinator for more information – or make an appointment with Angela Maki in the IPO.

Bringing your family with you

If you plan to bring your family to Michigan, you should bring complete medical records, written in English, for ALL family members. All NELI students and their dependents are required to have and maintain full health insurance coverage. Please note that a student’s personal medical record is helpful to expedite any needed medical treatment in the United States.

If you have children of school age, (5 years old to 18 years old) there are public elementary, middle, and high schools in Marquette. Here is a list of the public schools in Marquette.

SCHOOL

ADDRESS AND CONTACT INFORMATION

Elementary Schools

Superior Hill Elementary School

1201 South McClellan Avenue
1.906.225.4295
mwoodard@mapsnet.org

Sandy Knoll Elementary School

401 North 6th Street
1.906.225.4281
sandyknoll@mapsnet.org  

Cherry Creek Elementary School

1111 Ortman Road
1.906.225.4399
cherrycreek@mapsnet.org

Middle School

Bothwell Middle School

1200 Tierney Street
1.906.225.4262
bothwell@mapsnet.org

High Schools

Marquette Alternative High School

611 North Front Street
1.906.225.4302
altschool@mapsnet.org

Marquette Senior High School

1203 West Fair Avenue

1.906.225.5353

highschool@mapsnet.org

If you have questions about public schools in Marquette, please contact each public school directly. In order for your children to enroll at one of the listed public schools, you will need the following:

  • A record of the child’s immunizations (shots): diphtheria, tetanus, polio, measles, mumps, and rubella. A tuberculin before arrival skin test is recommended. Records should document a student’s vaccinations and oral immunizations by the month and year they were administered.
  • A birth certificate or passport is required to enroll students in local schools.
  • Records, in English, of previous schools attended are required for middle and high school enrollment.
 

 

NELI Student Pre-departure and Flight Schedule

Here is what you should pack and bring to the U.S. and Marquette:

  • All immigration documents: THE ORIGINAL AND COPY. Do not pack them in your suitcase. Keep them with you at all times.
  • Clothes for 2 or 3 days: It is always good to pack one extra set of clothing in your carry-on luggage in case the airlines lose your suitcases.
  • Medical history and description of any medicine you are taking – in ENGLISH – for you and all of your dependents
  • If you are coming to Marquette in the winter, one very heavy jacket: Just one jacket is enough, and you can purchase more jackets at one of the second-hand store in Marquette for a very cheap price. Here is a list of the second-hand stores in Marquette Michigan:
    • Saint Vincent DePaul: 2119 Presque Isle Ave. This is very close to campus.
    • Pak Rats: 1310 S. Front Street
    • Goodwill: 3125 U.S. 41 (near Wal-Mart)
    • Salvation Army: 1009 W. Baraga
    • Tots-N-Tykes (Children’s Clothing): 1112 Champion St.
  • Something to show of your culture, such as pictures, national flag(s), traditional clothes, small currency etc.
  • Cash OR traveler’s check:  While $200 will be enough, do not bring $100 dollar bills. Many places do not accept $100 dollar bills.

Here is what you DO NOT need to bring (but you may bring, if you wish):

  • Educational supplies such as pen and paper
  • Many clothes and heavy jackets
  • Bedding
  •  

You can purchase these in Marquette quite cheaply at the second-hand stores (see above).


 

Arriving in Marquette and Northern Michigan University

 

You will need to schedule your flight into K.I. Sawyer International Airport in Marquette, Michigan. 

 

To fly into K.I. Sawyer International Airport (MQT), you have only two options.

  • You can fly to the Chicago O’Hare International Airport (ORD) in Illinois, and then fly to K.I. Sawyer International Airport with American Airline.
  • You can fly to the Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport (DTW) in Detroit, Michigan, and then fly to K.I. Sawyer International Airport with Delta Air Lines.

 

Important Note: There is a one-hour difference between Chicago and Marquette.

  • Chicago is in the Central Time Zone.
  • Marquette and Detroit are in the Eastern Time Zone.

 

 

Airport Pick-Up and Bedding

Airport Pick Up and Bedding is optional. NMU will provide you with the following, if you wish:

  • A blanket, pillow, pillowcase, and sheets for your bed
  • Transportation from the airport and to your assigned housing

If you would like the IPO to pick you up from the airport and provide bedding, please email Angela Maki:

Angela Maki: anmaki@nmu.edu

 

The charge for the airport pick up and bedding is $80. If you choose this option, your student account will be charged $80.


TRAVEL WHILE IN THE U.S.

NOTE: Students who wish to travel while studying at NMU MUST meet with the IPO staff before making any travel arrangements.

Travel within the U.S.

You must carry your immigration documents with you. This includes the following:

  • Your passport
  • Your I-20 or DS-2019 Form
  • Your F-1 or J-1 Visa
  • Your NMU student ID

If you travel outside of Marquette, you must keep your NMU ID with you at all times.

While you are in Marquette, at least carry your immigration documents with you at all times.

 

Travel outside the U.S.

Only F-1 students are allowed to travel outside the U.S. However, there are several regulations and rules that you MUST follow. You MUST have following documents with you in order to travel outside the U.S. AND re-enter the U.S.:

  • Valid I-20 Form with signature from IPO staff
  • Valid passport
  • Transcript from NELI
  • Financial documents listed on your I-20 Form
  • Any other immigration documents you may have
 

 

THINGS TO REPORT TO NMU’S International Programs Office (IPO)

 

NMU is required to report certain information to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). We are required to maintain and correct information related to your status as a non-immigrant university student. In most instances, it is a simple matter of sending in a notification by means of the International Student Advisor in the IPO. Failure to do so could cause you to fall out of immigration status, and – if serious enough – you could be asked to leave the country. Some information you will report by email to the International Student Advisor. For other information updates, you will need to take care of in person, because you will need to complete some paperwork. If you need to complete paperwork, please call and schedule an appointment: 906.227.2510.

 

You must inform the IPO within SEVEN DAYS

if ANY of the following changes occur:

 


You may email this information to the IPO office (ipo@nmu.edu):

  • Change of address
  • Change of telephone number
  • New cell phone number
  • New email address

You must go to the IPO office – in person – for the following:

  • Change of Name
  • Travel plans outside of the United States
  • Passport expiration or United States Student Visa expiration

 

SCHEDULE A 15-MINUTE APPOINTMENT FOR THE ABOVE ISSUES


 

Be sure to inform the NELI Coordinator promptly for the following:

  • Difficulty with classes because of class content, language level, illness, or personal reasons
  • Plans to transfer to another school

 

Be sure to inform the IPO office promptly for ANY of the following:

  • Employment on campus: All students must apply for a Social Security Number. J-1 students need a letter of support before they begin work.
  • Practical training opportunities, such as internships for the summer
  • Change of school
  • Change of immigration category or classification – for example, changing from a J-1 to a tourist visa for extended summer traveling

“Reinstatement” for not maintaining status. If you break the rules – you may get a second chance – BUT DO NOT COUNT ON IT.

 

Life at NMU and Marquette

 

Housing

Residence Hall Living

Residence Hall
The residence hall is a good place for NELI students to live – and it offers a great opportunity for NELI students to make American friends and learn and experience American campus life. NMU has 10 residence halls. Each residence hall has the following amenities:

  • Study room
  • TV rooms
  • Lobby/recreation area
  • Laundry facilities
  • Cable TV – NOTE: You need to buy your own TV
  • Local phone service
  • Wireless internet
  • Front desk
  • Vacuums
  • Mailboxes
  • Bicycle racks
  • Vending machines

In order to live in a residence hall, you need to contact the IPO AND the Housing and Residence Life to create a legal contract.

Your Resident Assistant is the primary person you should go to if you have any questions about the residence hall – once you have moved in.

Food


If you live in a residence hall, you are required to purchase meal plans to eat at dining halls. There is a variety of choices where you can go to eat at campus. All you need is to bring your NMU student ID card (WILCAT Express Card).

However, adjusting to new types of food can be difficult. If you have a difficult time finding what you want to eat in a dining hall, you should always talk to your residence hall staff – or ask the NELI instructors or Coordinator. 

Please check out the Food Co-Op in Marquette. It is open until 9:00 p.m. every day, and it carries some international food.

Additionally, the World Food store in Houghton, MI has food from other countries. World Food makes deliveries to Marquette. Orders are placed once a month and delivered the following month. Please contact IPO or the NELI Coordinator for more information about World Foods.

For students who can eat only halal meat, the Food Co-op in Marquette has halal chicken. Please consult your residence hall staff and NELI staff for this.

TEMPORARY HOUSING

There are several temporary housing options s available in Marquette. *All expense is NELI students’ responsibility.

 
  • Comfort Suites
    2463 US 41, Marquette, MI
    906-228-0028
  • Econo Lodge Lakeside
    2050 US 41, Marquette, MI
    906-225-1305
  • Days Inn Marquette
    2403 US 41, Marquette, MI
    906-225-1393
  • Country Inn & Suites By Carlson
    2472 US 41, Marquette, MI
    906-225-1300
  • Holiday Inn Marquette
    1951 US 41, Marquette, MI
    906-225-0255
  • Super 8 Marquette
    1275 US 41, Marquette, MI
    906-228-8100
  • Ramada Marquette
    412 W Washington St, Marquette, MI
    906-228-6000
  • Cedar Motor Inn
    2523 US 41, Marquette, MI
    906-228-2280
 

 

OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING

If you are over 21 year old or of junior standing, you may live off-campus. Please go to http://www.nmu.edu/dso/node/39 to find off-campus housing.

Constant Meal Plan

$2,161 per semester

Allows the student to eat an unlimited amount of meals per week. This plan also includes one Late Night dining swipe each semester on Sundays through Wednesdays.

Also includes $153 in dining dollars and eight guest passes.

14-Meal Plan

$2,039 per semester

Allows the student to eat 14 meals a week. This plan also includes $121 in dining dollars and four guest passes.

8-Meal Plan

$1,475 per semester

Allows the student to eat 8 meals a week. This plan also includes $367 in dining dollars and four guest passes.

Spooner Meal Plan

$835 per semester

Available only to Spooner Hall residents - the entire amount is in dining dollars.


Meal Plans


Those who purchase a Residence Hall Meal Plan (other than Spooner Meal Plan) get “Guest Passes” included on their NMU ID each semester.

 

 

 

The Wildcat Express Card

The Wildcat Express Card is your photo identification card at Northern Michigan University. It is used for the following purposes:

  • Dining Dollars
  • Meal Plan
  • Catca$h
  • Time & Attendance
  • PEIF
  • Athletic Events
  • Copy and Printing in the Olson Library
  • Checking out books and materials in the Olson Library
  • ATM/Debit Card, if you link to your Wells Fargo checking account

FOOD SERVICE:

You can access your meal plan with your Wildcat Express Card.

  • You must always present your ID/Meal Card to the Food Service cashier every time you eat.
  • Protect your meal card as if it was cash. Report lost cards to the Wildcat Express Office in the University Center immediately.

 

PARKING ON CAMPUS:

All students living on or off campus must have their vehicle registered to park on campus and pay the necessary annual parking fee of $140.

 

Please contact the Parking Services office with any questions you may have: 906.227.1476 or email them at prizzio@nmu.edu

 

PERSONAL MAIL:

Your personal mailbox is located in your dorm/apartment lobby and corresponds with your room number. Your room key opens your mailbox. Mail is distributed Monday through Saturday between 1:00 and 3:00 p.m.

 

Federal Express and special deliveries are made twice daily.

 

Your address while at NMU is as follows:

 

(Your Name)

Room  # (Insert # here)  ~ (enter dorm name)

1401 Presque Isle Avenue

Northern Michigan University

Marquette, MI 49855

 

Transportation

Bus System

You do not have to have your own car in order to live in Marquette, especially, if you live in a residence hall. Getting to your classrooms, the dining hall, or other campus places are all within walking distance. If you need to go to a store or somewhere off campus, you should ask for help from American students: This is one good way to make new friends.

There is also public transportation in Marquette: MARQ-TRAN. There are several routes and schedules to local businesses and back to NMU’s campus. The fare (cost) is 40 cents with your NMU student ID card. Please check the MARQ-TRAN web site: http://marqtran.com/ for more information.

Obtaining a driver’s license

In order to drive a motor vehicle (a car or motorcycle), you must have valid driver’s license issued by the State of Michigan.  If you are over 18 years old, and have valid driver’s license in your home country, you can apply for a Michigan driver’s license. You must go to the Secretary of State’s office (www.sos.state.mi.us) to obtain a driver’s license. In addition, you must have U.S. Social Security Number to obtain a driver’s license. To get a Social Security Number, you need to have job. Both F-1 and J-1 student may work and obtain a Social Security Number. Please contact the IPO, if you are thinking of getting a driver’s license.


Climate in Marquette

Marquette has 4 seasons. Below are the approximate times for each season.

  • Summer: June, July, and August
  • Fall (or Autumn): September, October, and November
  • Winter: December, January, and February
  • Spring: March, April, and May

July and August are usually warmest months; the average temperature is 15 degrees in Celsius. January and February are coldest months; average temperature is -7.8 degrees in Celsius. However, at each campus building there is heating system. In addition, you can buy heavy jacket for a cheap price. Marquette gets snow as well. During the winter, Marquette gets around 50cm of snow monthly.

Tornadoes
Tornadoes may occur in Michigan, typically during severe thunderstorms in early spring and summer. Here are important terms you should know:

Watch: A Tornado Watch or Severe Thunderstorm Watch is issued when weather conditions are favorable for severe thunderstorms to produce tornadoes in and close to the watch area.

Warning: A Tornado Warning or Severe Thunderstorm Warning is issued by the local Weather Service Office whenever a severe thunderstorm has actually been sighted or strongly indicated by radar. This gives you time to act.

If you live residence hall, you MUST follow your residence hall staff’s direction.

What to do if a tornado happens while you are . . .

At home/Residence Hall:  Go to the basement. A basement is the safest place at home. If you live off-campus, (in an apartment), where you do not have a basement, take cover in the center of the house on the lowest level floor in a small room such as a closet or bathroom, or under strong furniture.

Driving a car: Drive in RIGHT ANGLES to the tornado’s path. If there is not time to drive away from the tornado, get out the car into a basement, ditch, or any low place away from the car.

At class or school: Follow NELI instructors’ instruction, or go to small rooms on the lowest floor of the building.


Banks in Marquette

 

There are three banks near NMU campus where you can open your bank account.

 

Bank

Documents to Open Account

Monthly Fee to maintain account

Benefits

Wells Fargo
https://www.wellsfargo.com/

  • Passport
  • NMU student ID Card

$7
If you maintain $500 in your account each month, fee is waived.

  • Online and Mobile Banking
  • Free Debit Card
  • ATM and office are located at campus

River Valley Bank
http://www.rivervalleybank.com/

  • International Tax Identification
  • Passport
  • NMU Student ID
  • Proof of local address

$5

If you maintain at least $300 in your account, this fee is waived

  • No ATM Fee at River Valley Bank’s ATM
  • Online and Mobile Banking
  • Visa Debit Card

Range Bank
http://www.rangebank.com/

  • Passport
  • NMU Student ID
  • Proof of local address

No minimum balance required

  • ATM Debit Card
  • Mobile Banking
  • 50 Free checks

Cell Phone Use while at NMU

Bringing your own cell phone

  • If you have an iPhone from your country, you should be able to use it in the U.S. Please contact the Apple Store in your country for assistance.
  • If you have a smartphone, but not an iPhone, you may be able to use it in the U.S. Please contact your phone company in your country for assistance.

 

Purchasing a cell phone in the U.S.
Verizon Wireless and AT&T are two companies that operate in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Each company requires you to sign two-year contract. You will be obligated to pay a set rate each month for the next 24 months.

 

There are two types of cell phones you may purchase in the U.S.:

  • A Contract Phone
  • A Non-Contract Phone

 

Contract Phones  

Why are contract phones a good idea?

  • Often the cell phone is free when you sign a new contract. However, better phones cost more money ($100 or more).
  • Cell phones on these contracts usually have more features.
  • You can pay for phone plans with unlimited minutes and unlimited text messaging.
  • AT&T may be able to change the chip in your international cell phone from home. They you can, use your own phone while in the U.S.

 

Why are contract phones a bad idea?

  • You need to have U.S. Social Security Number in order to make contract.
  • Each month you will pay between $50~$100 for the phone plan.
  • You will be charged high fees if you overused your minute limit or text message limit.
  • If you break a two-year contract, you will be charged.

 

Non-Contract Phones
With this kind of cell phone, you purchase a cell phone and you purchase phone cards with minutes. These are “pay as you go,” so when you run out of minutes, or money, on the phone card, your cell phone will no longer work unless you add minutes. You must continually purchase more minutes to have the cell phone continue to work. The two most common brands of non-contract cell phones are Tracfone and Straight Talk.

 

Why are non-contract phones a good idea?

  • Cell Phones are not expensive.
  • You only need to purchase a new phone card when your old card expires.
  • There is no contract or required monthly payment.
  • If you are not satisfied with your service, you can discontinue it without the penalty fees.
  • You do not need a U.S. Social Security Card to purchase the phone.

 

Why are non-contract phones a bad idea?

  • If you try to connect to the Internet, it might be slower than contract cell-phone service.

HEALTH

Tips to maintain your health

  • Sleep well
  • Eat healthy and food and maintain a balanced diet
  • Exercise
  • Know when you are stressed out – and talk with someone
  • Avoid with drinking and smoking
  • Be involved in variety of activities at campus

In Case You Get Sick or Have a Minor Injury
If you are sick or have a minor injury (stomach ache, cough, etc.), you may call the Ada B. Vielmetti Health Center. Here is the NMU Campus Health Center contact information:

Website: http://www.nmu.edu/healthcenter/node/1
Phone number: 906-227-2355
Hours: 8-4:30 Monday through Friday

If Ada B. Vielmetti Health Center is closed, but you need to see a doctor immediately, please call one of these two numbers:

Marquette General Hospital
580 W. College Ave
Close to NMU campus
906-228-9440

http://www.mgh.org

Open 24 hours

Upper Peninsula Medical Center
1414 W. Fair Ave
906-225-3905

http://www.penmed.com/index.php

8am to 5pm Monday through Thursday

7am to 5pm on Friday

 

If it is emergency, such as a loss of consciousness, severe bleeding, broken bone, etc. you must call 911. Then state the following:

  • Say it is emergency
  • Give your full name
  • Give your full address in Marquette
  • Describe the problem

If you live in a residence hall, let someone in the residence hall know that you have an emergency.

Health Insurance
As NELI students, you are automatically enrolled Northern Michigan University’s health insurance policy.


Physical Education Instruction Facility (PEIF): Student Recreation Center

NELI students have the choice to use student recreation center, PEIF, on campus. Visit PEIF to purchase a membership. The fee is: $70 for 1 semester, $130 for 2 semesters, and $195 for 3 semesters (until the end of summer). 


The U.S. Legal System

The American legal system is very different from legal systems in other countries. All NELI students must follow the same laws as Americans. If you break the law, you will be treated the same as an American. If you are found guilty of a crime, you may be deported and may lose your rights to return to the United States.

Here are some examples that can get you into serious trouble with the law and may have you arrested:

  • Fighting in public
  • Acts of violence
  • Carrying a weapon without authorization from police department
  • Carrying an open alcohol container in public: You cannot drink alcohol on the street and/or hold an open can or bottle of alcohol while you are on the street/sidewalk.
  • Underage drinking: YOU MUST BE 21 YEARS OLD TO DRINK ALCOHOL IN THE UNITED STATES!
  • Driving Under the Influence of alcohol: This is driving when drunk
  • Distribution, use, or possession of any illegal drug or controlled substance
  • Urinating in public
  • Sexual harassment

 

Security in Marquette and on NMU’s Campus

Although there are some crimes in Marquette, Marquette is considered one of the safest cities in the U.S.

Crime rate in Marquette is lower than the U.S. average.  The majority of crime is non-violent crime: theft (stealing someone’s property). Please go to http://www.usa.com/marquette-mi-crime-and-crime-rate.htm for details of the crime rate in Marquette, MI.

There is a Marquette County Sheriff’s Department in Marquette, as well as the NMU campus public safety department: This is the NMU campus police department. Campus Public Safety patrols the campus 24 hours a day, seven days a week. You can also request “campus escorts”: Public safety personnel will take you to your destination within campus after sunset.

Throughout campus, there are “blue buttons.” These buttons are automatically link to Public Safety, and a police officer will arrive at the place immediately to help you. If you witness a crime or you find yourself the victim of a crime, you can push these “blue buttons” to report and ask for help. Familiarize yourself with these areas on campus, and please ask your instructor or the NELI Coordinator if you cannot find these areas.


Carrying weapons at campus

You may not carry any kinds of weapons, including guns and explosive devices, on campus.

This is violation of the NMU Student Code. You may own a rifle or knife for hunting purpose. However, you must register your rifle or knife to Public Safety, and you must store your rifle or knife at Public Safety.

This means that you cannot keep them in your room at campus.

 

Cultural and Activity Information

 

Culture Shock

What is culture shock?

Culture shock is the impact you may feel when you enter a culture that is unfamiliar to you. ALL international students experience culture shock no matter where they come from, and it is normal to experience culture shock. Below are some signs and symptoms of culture shock:

  • Feelings of sadness and loneliness
  • Headaches, pains, and allergies
  • Sleeping too much or too little
  • Feeling anger
  • Idealizing your own culture: thinking that your culture is better than American culture
  • Becoming obsessed with the new culture: thinking that American culture is perfect
  • Feeling that small problems seem are hard
  • Feeling shy or insecure
  • Developing feelings of homesickness
  • Feeling lost or confused
  • Questioning your decision to move to Northern Michigan University, attending NELI, or coming to the U.S.

The 4 phases of culture shock

Typically, international students go through 4 phases of culture shock. They are as follows:

  1. Honeymoon Period
    Typically, during the first month of arrival to a new culture, you feel everything is great, and you are always happy. You are very active: You want to try new things, and you feel you want to be in this new culture.
  2. Culture Shock Period
    After the Honeymoon Period, international students typically experience a culture shock phase for 2 to 3 months. During this period, you may feel signs and symptoms of culture shock, which are listed above. You may not feel happy, and you become may become less active than you used to be. You think that your own culture is better than American culture.
  3. Adjustment Period
    After international students go through the culture shock period, they go through an adjustment period, which is about 4 months after arrival to the U.S. You start to feel better. You start to accept cultural differences between your culture and American culture, and you begin to try to understand American culture more and start to make more friends.
  4. Recovery Period
    After international students experience the adjustment period, they start to integrate more easily into American culture. This means you will feel comfortable with your own culture AND American culture. You appreciate and accept cultural differences between your own culture and American culture. You also start to realize that your English skills have improved.

Although you will reach the Recovery Period, you may experience culture shock more than one time during your time at NMU.

 

How can you get over culture shock?

 

Unfortunately, and as previously mentioned, most international students experience culture shock, and there is no concrete and easy way to “cure” it. However, there are ways your culture shock can be made less painful:

 

  • Know that culture shock will happen to you and understand culture shock.
  • Try to keep your health good and get plenty of rest.
  • Talk to American students; do not just stay in your room, and meet/see people.
  • Get involved in campus events and activities, as well as local community events.
  • Make local friends: This means make friends with people from the local community.
  • Have someone, such as your family, close friends in your home country, someone who has authority and experienced culture shock before, or someone else you can trust to talk with you about your feelings.
  • Try to enjoy cultural differences.
  • Stay focused and keep busy.

The NELI Instructors and Coordinator – and the IPO have a variety of activities and events for you to participate in to keep your experiences at NMU happy. Here are some examples of activities by NELI and IPO:

 

  • IPO Welcome Picnic: IPO hosts a picnic for all international students and NELI students at Presque Isle Park approximately two weeks after the first day of Session 1. It is a FREE picnic, and IPO will provide a variety of food for you.
  • Wildcats International Neighbors. You can make friends with people from the local community by meeting with them once in month. This is a good way to learn about American culture, share your culture, practice your English skills, and make new friends.
  • Discover Culture: The IPO invites all American students, international students, and NELI students to talk about culture. You can learn American culture from NMU students and share your culture with American students. These American students are interested in knowing about other cultures and you, so it is easy for you to become friends with them!

 

There will be more activities and events available for you throughout the year. Both NELI and IPO strongly encourage you to participate in all activities and events that we offer to you. Please go to http://www.nmu.edu/internationalprograms/node/225 to find out more activities available to NELI and international students.

 

As NELI students, you have access to attend NMU college sports events, such as American football, Ice Hockey, Volleyball, etc. College sports are very important aspects of American college campus living, and you should attend as many events as possible to learn about American culture.

 


 

Religious Freedom

 

In the U.S., individuals have freedom of religion. This means that people can believe what they want without harassment or punishment. This also means that people may talk freely about their religious beliefs. Some people may want to talk about religion with you, or some people may want you to join their religious activities. It is okay to say “No thank you” if you are not interested in talking or if you are not comfortable participating in religious activities.

 

Prayer Room


There is a prayer room in the University Center at NMU. This room is open to ALL religions.

The prayer room is down the hall from the bookstore. If you need help finding this room, be sure to ask your instructor or the NELI Coordinator.


American Holidays

New Year’s Day

January 1

Birthday of Martin Luther King Jr.

Third Monday of January

Memorial Day

Last Monday in May

Flag Day

June 14

Independence Day

July 4

Labor Day

First Monday of September

Columbus Day

Second Monday in October

Election Day

Tuesday on or after November 2

Veterans Day

November 11

Thanksgiving

Fourth Thursday in November

Christmas

December 25

 


Time Zones and Daylight Saving Time

 

Time Zones
In the U.S., there are six different time zones: East, Central, Mountain, Pacific, Alaska, and Hawaii. Marquette, Michigan is in the Eastern Time zone. Here is an example of the different times for six different time zones:

Eastern Time Zone (Marquette)

January 1st, 9:00am

  •  

January 1st, 8:00am

  •  

January 1st, 7:00am

  •  

January 1st, 6:00am

  •  

January 1st, 5:00am

  •  

January 1st, 4:00am


Daylight Saving Time

Americans ‘change their clocks’ two times each year to make better use of daylight. Clocks are changed the second Sunday in March and the first Sunday in November at 2:00 a.m.

 

Fall Backward:

Daylight Saving Time ends the first Sunday in November. Clocks are turned back one hour. For example, if you go to bed at 10:00 p.m., you will turn back your clock to show 9:00 p.m. This year we will turn back our clocks on Sunday, November 3, 2013.

 

Spring Forward:

Daylight Saving Time begins at second Sunday in March. Clocks are moved forward one hour. For example, if you go to bed at 10:00 p.m., you will turn your clock ahead to show 11:00 p.m. Next year, it will be on Sunday March 9, 2014.

 

All electric devices, including your mobile device and cell phone, etc., should automatically change the time automatically – but be sure to check! This is not an excuse to be late to class or to miss class.

  •  
  •  

To change Fahrenheit into Celsius subtract 32 and multiply by 5/9: (F-32) x 5/9 = C.

 

Fahrenheit (degree)

Celsius (degree)

  1.  
  1.  
  1.  
  1.  
  1.  
  1.  
  1.  

20 (room temperature)

  1.  
  1.  
  1.  
  1.  
  1.  

200 (boiling)

  1.  

37 (body temperature)

 

Other Conversions

  •  

1 mile = 1.6 km1 quart = 900ml
1 yard = 91cm1 gallon = 3.78L
1 foot = 30.4cm1 ounce = 28g
1 inch = 2.5cm1 pound = 450g