Reassigned Time Awards

Winter 2011

Applicant Name: Amy Hamilton
Department: English
Rank: Assistant Professor
Project Title: Rethinking the Literary “Old West”: Western American Literature Before 1800
Project Abstract: Drawing upon my recent work in both Western American Literature and Early American Literature, I propose to utilize NMU’s Reassigned Time Award to continue the work of editing and publishing a collection of essays that will significantly contribute to both of these fields. Traditionally, Western American Literature has been arbitrarily bounded by region and era as west of the Mississippi and primarily nineteenth century texts. However, both designations have been challenged recently by scholars seeking to complicate our understanding of region and draw the field into the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. This collection seeks to engage these current challenges by proposing a Western Literature that includes pre-1800 texts that focus on regions not commonly thought of as western. The collection will invite scholars to seriously consider how our understanding of Western Literature can evolve if we reimagine
when and where the West began.

Applicant Name: Bao Truong
Department: Mathematics & CS
Rank: Assistant Professor
Project Title: “Necessary conditions in multiobjective optimization in general Banach spaces and applications” (manuscript)
Project Abstract: New necessary conditions for Pareto minimal points to sets and Pareto minimizers for constrained multiobjective optimization problems are established for the class of continuous functions in general infinite-dimensional Banach spaces. They significantly improve the corresponding results in Theorem 3.3 in Mathematical Methods of Operations Research 64 (2006), 521-541 by J. Dutta and Chr. Tammer and Theorem 3.1 in Optimization 26 (1992), 277-285 by B. El Abdouni and L. Thibault since we do not impose any Lipschitzian continuity assumptions on the coast functions. Our approach is mainly based the advanced tools of variational analysis and generalized differentiation; in particular, the Tammer and Weidner’s version of the separation theorem for nonconvex sets and the subdifferentials of vector-valued mappings introduced by Bao and Mordukhovich. Furthermore, applications in critical point theory are discussed.This project continues work begun in my manuscript entitled “Language necessary conditions for Pareto minimizers in Asplund spaces and applications” submitted for publication in Nonlinear Analysis in which applications in finance mathematics and approximation theory were studies. Since the results obtained in this paper cannot be applied to critical point theory due to the lack of the Asplund property of the space under consideration, such a proposed development needs to be studied.I will use this Reassigned Time Award to complete this research paper and submit for publication in a refereed journal. (Please note: this is a new proposal with a fresh motivation from critical point theory.)

Applicant Name: James McCommons
Department: English
Rank: Associate Professor
Project Title: Research for book on George Shiras III
Project Abstract: To complete research for the writing of a historical nonfiction book that examines the life and professional accomplishments of George Shiras III. The world’s first wildlife photographer, author of the Migratory Bird Act and an important figure in Progressive Conservation Movement of the early 20
thcentury. Research will focus on discovery at University of Pittsburgh library archives which contain several boxes of Shiras’s scrapbooks, speeches, magazine articles, draft autobiography and personal correspondence (including original letters from Theodore Roosevelt). The materials were uncovered for this project in 2010 and have lain unexamined for nearly 70 years.

Applicant Name: Russell Prather
Department: English
Rank: Associate ProfessorProject Title: Palimpsest Paintings for the UP Focus Show at NMU’s DeVos Museum
Project Abstract: I am one of two artists who have been selected to mount the 2012 U.P.
Focus exhibition at Northern Michigan University’s DeVos Museum and the primary goal of my Reassigned Time Award project is to create several large pieces of multimedia visual art for this exhibition, which opens in February 2012.

Applicant Name: Jaspal K. Singh
Department: English
Rank: Professor
Project Title: Imagining Nations and Homelands: Gender and Sikh Identity in Indian and Diasporic Literature
Project Abstract: Drawing from my recent monograph and anthologies publications, I propose to utilize NMU’s Reassigned Time Award to continue working on my book project that will significantly contribute to world literature. My project examines Punjabi Sikh male and female writers at home and in the diaspora in order to understand how Sikhs imagine national identity and homeland. Sikhs cultural and religious identities are intertwined constructed as they are by various local and global discourses, and they are oftentimes represented in contradictory and complex ways. These complexities derive from at least four important historical times in India: (1) The Muslim incursions, (2) British colonialism, (3) the violence ensuring the partition of India into two nation-states, Pakistan and India, and (4) the massacre of Sikhs during the 1984 attacks by Hindu fundamentalists. Thus, Sikh identity and the associative violence imagined in popular discourse and literature must be examined within geo-political national and diasporic spaces to arrive at a critical understanding of Indian literature and culture.

Fall 2010

Applicant: Adam Prus
Department: Psychology
Rank: Associate Professor
Title: Psychopharmacology textbook

Abstract: The reassigned time award will be used to reduce my course load by 4 additional credits in order to allow time to complete three textbook chapters. I am presently under contract to write a single-authored textbook for undergraduate Psychology courses on Psychopharmacology. After a summer without teaching, I was able to complete, and have accepted, 3 chapters (or 1 chapter per month). However, this pace is unsustainable during the academic year and will prevent me from completing a full text before the January 2012 deadline.

I will complete 2 chapters before the Winter 2011 semester (completing most of this during the winter break).  Four credits reassigned to this writing activity in the Winter 2011 semester will enable me to complete 3 additional chapters. This in addition to 3 chapters in the summer would leave me with 2 chapters to complete during the fall 2011 semester and the winter break. Thus, this reassigned time award will allow me to accomplish a significant portion of this continuing project next semester.

Applicant: Lesley Larkin
Department: English
Rank: Assistant Professor
Title: Reading, Race, and Twentieth-Century African American Literature

Abstract: Reading, Race, and Twentieth-Century African American Literature is a book-length work of literary criticism that explore the ways 20th-century African American literature teaches readers how to read it. My central thesis is that responsible ways of reading about racial difference are modeled in the themes and literary techniques of African American literature itself because of that tradition’s ongoing contemplation of how to write for an audience that is both black and white. In support of this claim, I re-read major works by James Weldon Johnson, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellision, James Baldwin, Jamaica Kincaid, and Toni Morrison in order to identify theories about reading race of use to scholars and teachers of African American literature. I hope this project will be of special us to teachers of African American literature who teach at predominantly white institutions.

This ongoing project continues work begun in my PhD dissertation (completed December 2007) and extended during Winter 2010 and Fall 2010. A Reassigned Time Award in the coming academic year will assist me in completing a manuscript draft next year.

Applicant: Marguerite Moore

Department: HPER

Rank: Asst. Professor

Title: Migraine Symptom progression in the postdrome phase

Abstract: Migraine is a progressive and debilitating disease affecting approximately 18-25% of the female population and 6-13% of the male population. The burden of migraine on society is estimate to cost 13 billion annually due to indirect and direct costs. Migraine can be separated into migraine with and without aura symptoms. Research has focused on imaging studies of the brain, drug intervention, and co-morbid diseases as well as triggers. Migraine management is dependant on the debilitating symptoms sometimes lasting days beyond the “headache” phase to determine accurate and effective treatment as well as prevention. While there is an abundance of literature on migraineurs, little is known of the symptom progression following migraine. No research to date has compared symptom progression of migraineurs with aura to those without and controls over a full weeks time. This research will assist physicians and patients with preventative and immediate treatment options.

Applicant: Zac Cogley
Department: Philosophy
Rank: Assistant Professor
Title: Wrath and Patience

Abstract: Aristotle has it right; “Getting angry […] is easy and everyone can do it; but doing it to the right person, in the right amount, at the right time, for the right end, and in the right way is not easy, nor can everyone do it.” Building from Aristotle, we can relatively easily characterize a wrathful person: someone prone to extreme anger in inappropriate circumstances. A patient person, then, feels just the right amount of anger in just the appropriate circumstances. But saying exactly what the right amount of anger would be in which circumstances is quite difficult, as Aristotle suggests. In this project, I appeal to recent work in psychology and the philosophy of emotion to explore our reasons for feeling—and avoiding—anger. In doing so I relate virtue theory to the recent philosophical focus on reasons for attitudes. By pulling apart different reasons that bear on whether to be angry, how intensely to be angry, in what way, and in which situations, I explore the considerations to which the patient person is sensitive and the particular faults present in the wrathful person.

Applicant: Amy T. Hamilton
Department: English
Rank: Assistant Professor
Title: Rethinking the Literary “Old West”: Western American Literature Before 1800

Abstract: Drawing upon my recent work in both Western American Literature and Early American Literature, I propose to utilize NMU’s Reassigned Time Award to continue the work of editing and publishing a collection of essays that will significantly contribute to both these fields. Traditionally, Western American Literature has been arbitrarily bounded by region and era as west of the Mississippi and primarily nineteenth century texts. However, both designations have been challenged recently by scholars seeking to complicate our understanding of region and draw the field into the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. This collection seeks to engage these current challenges by proposing a Western Literature that includes pre-1800 texts and texts that focus on regions not commonly thought of as western. The collection will invite scholars to seriously consider how our understanding of Western Literature can evolve if we reimagine when and where the West began. 

Applicant: Terry Delpier
Department: Nursing
Rank: Full Professor
Title: CA-MRSA Threat: Manuscript

Abstract: Outbreaks of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) have become more common in athletes. CA-MRSA is a disease that is thought to be spread through person to person contact. Infection with CA-MRSA is associated with lost time (from practice and competition), financial costs, and sometimes significant sequela, or even death. Prevention of this disease in high school athletes is important to promote health and well being. Current literature primarily focuses on describing outbreaks, medical treatments and outcomes. Typically, hygiene practices of athletes are alluded to or are recommended. However, little attention has been paid to understanding the actually hygiene practices of adolescent athletes and the influences on those practices. My research was a qualitative study that described the hygiene experience of adolescent football players. It is only by first understanding what current practices are that health care providers may begin to develop effective interventions for prevention of CA-MRSA.

I am requesting 4 credits of reassigned time so that I will have time to update my literature review and be able to rewrite and resubmit a manuscript for the completed research study.

Winter 2010

Applicant Name: Gabriel Brahm
Department: English
Rank: Assistant Professor
Project Title: “Edward Said and Frantz Fanon: the Politics of Post-Colonial Theory
Project Abstract: I propose to continue working on my book manuscript—Anti-American Studies: Culture and Disciplinarity Post 9/11—by producing a new chapter: first as an invited workshop presentation, then as en essay submitted for inclusion in an anthology, and finally as an integrated section of the book, to be completed by 2011. This presentation/essay/chapter will investigate the politics of post-colonial theory, by focusing on its two iconic progenitors—the anti-colonialist writer and activist, Frantz Fanon, and the literary critic and Palestinian activist, Edward Said. The project combines research I have long been conducting in a couple of areas: literary theory, and cultures of the Middle East in relation to America’s role in the world. The workshop I have been invited to participate in is planned for two-weeks this summer at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, in Washington, DC. Based on my work there, upon returning to Marquette, I will spend fall semester writing and essay for inclusion in a volume to be published by the workshop. I will revise this essay to make it a chapter of my book. (Please note: this is a new proposal, with a new bibliography and a fresh letter of initiation, not a repeat of my last one: It starts with a paragraph explaining the same book I’ve been working on, but then goes into the specifics of the new project for Fall 2010.)

Applicant Name: Nanci Gasiewicz    
Department: Nursing
Rank: Assistant Professor
Project Title: “Satisfaction Among Adult Inpatients With Diabetes When Glycemic Control is Managed by a Nurse Practitioner Led Diabetes Management Team” (manuscript)
Abstract:  Client satisfaction can be viewed as a dependent variable of quality of care, as well as, a predictor of subsequent health related behaviors (Cox, McLaughlin, Steen, & Hudson, 2006). According to Brice (1994) client satisfaction with nursing care is the most important predictor of clients' overall satisfaction with hospital care. Satisfaction with care is closely linked to the client's decision to adhere to recommended treatment regimens, implement suggested health behaviors, seek repeat services in the future, and experience more favorable health outcomes (Cox, 2003; Kovac, Patel, Peterson, & Kimmel, 2002).

Nurse practitioner (NP) led chronic disease management teams are beginning to take the lead in providing quality health care in outpatient and clinic settings (Bryant & Graham, 2002). However, little is known about client satisfaction among inpatients with diabetes when glycemic control is managed by NP led teams. In fact, throughout the extensive literature review conducted for my doctoral project, no studies addressing client satisfaction with NP led inpatients diabetes management teams were found. Consequently, findings from my completed doctoral research study will make a significant contribution to nursing literature.

The purpose of my doctoral work was to conduct a descriptive correlational study to determine client satisfaction among adult inpatients when glycemic management is coordinated by a NP led team, and examine relationships between satisfaction and select demographics. I am requesting two (2) credits of reassigned time to update my literature review, and write and submit a manuscript of my completed research for publication.

Applicant Name: Amy T. Hamilton   
Department:    English
Rank: Assistant Professor
Project Title: Rethinking the Literary "Old West": Western American Literature Before 1800 Project Abstract: Drawing upon my recent work in both Western American Literature and Early American Literature, I propose to utilize NMU's Reassigned Time Award to lay the groundwork for the editing and publication of a collection of essays that will significantly contribute to both of these fields. Traditionally, Western American Literature has been arbitrarily bounded by region and era as west of the Mississippi and primarily nineteenth century texts. However, both designations have been challenged recently by scholars seeking to complicate our understanding of region and draw the field into the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. This collection seeks to engage these current challenges by proposing a Western Literature that includes pre-1800 texts and texts that focus on regions not commonly thought of as western. The collection will invite scholars to seriously consider how our understanding of Western Literature can evolve if we reimagine when and where the West began.

Applicant Name: Lesley Larkin         
Department: English
Rank: Assistant Professor      
Project Title: Book Project: Reading, Race, and Twentieth-Century African American Literature
Project Abstract: Reading, Race, and Twentieth-Century African American Literature is a book-length work of literary criticism that explores the ways 20th- century African American literature teaches readers how to read it. My central thesis is that responsible ways of reading about racial difference are modeled in the themes and literary techniques of African American literature itself because of that tradition's ongoing contemplation of how to write for an audience that is both black and white. In support of this claim, I re-read major works by James Weldon Johnson, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Jamaica Kincaid, and Toni Morrison in order to identify theories about reading race of use to scholars and teachers of African American literature. I hope this project will be of special use to teachers of African American literature who teach at predominantly white institutions.

This ongoing project continues work begun in my PhD dissertation (completed December 2007) and extended in the current semester, during which I am drafting a new chapter and revising the introduction and conclusion of my manuscript. A Reassigned Time Award in the coming academic year will allow me to complete a book manuscript by May 2011.

Applicant Name: Melissa Romero     
Department: Nursing
Rank: Assistant Professor      
Project Title: Personal Growth and Benefit Finding Experiences in Bereaved Family Caregivers of Individuals with Dementia: Manuscript
Project Abstract: Caregivers of individual's with dementia are usually older spouses or middle aged children who provide long-term unpaid care in the home. It has been proposed that stress and burnout from prolonged and extended periods of caregiving may be detrimental to the mental and physical well-being of family caregivers of person's with dementia and may place them at risk for complications in grief after the death of the care recipient. In addition to experiencing long-term stress and burnout, some researchers have found that family caregivers of individuals with dementia also experience personal growth prior to and after the death of the care recipient. The purpose of my doctoral work was to explore the role of pre-death personal growth on grief in bereaved family caregivers of individuals with dementia. In addition, benefit finding, a concept similar to personal growth, was examined in relation to personal growth and length of time since bereavement. If findings from this research indicate that pre-death personal growth is associated with reduced grief after the death, then future experimental research could test the effectiveness of interventions that nurses and other health care providers could use to promote personal growth prior to the death as a form of pre-bereavement intervention to reduce grief and promote mental health.

I am requesting two credits of reassigned time so that I will have the time to be able to write and submit a manuscript for the completed research study.

Fall 2009

Name: Derek L. Anderson
Department: Education
Project Title: Elementary Teacher Education Candidates’ Perceptions on Social Studies
Project Abstract: Elementary and secondary students frequently report Social Studies to be their least favorite subject (Hornstein, 1990; Keifer,2004, Shug, et al, 1982). In addition, the recent rise of high-stakes testing has further devalued Social Studies. A number of studies have found that the time devoted to Social Studies in the elementary grades is being reduced drastically (Burroughs et al., 2005; Heafner, Lipscomb, & Rock, 2006; Leming, 2006; Lintner, 2006; Rock et al., 2006; Stecher & Chun, 2001; VanFossen, 2005; von Zastrow & Janc, 2004). Recent state standards, as well as common democratic desires, suggest that today’s K-12 students must learn content knowledge, document analysis, and decision-making and problem-solving skills. Ensuring that tomorrow’s participants in American democracy have the necessary knowledge and skills is, in large part, dependent upon having teachers who possess the knowledge and skills necessary to teach social studies effectively.
            I will examine how the elementary teacher education candidates at NMU define social studies and what they consider to be most important to teach. Additionally, I seek to examine the social studies courses elementary teacher education candidates took prior to student teaching. Specifically, I will examine the extent to which the candidates took courses in each of the four pillars of social studies: history, economics, civics, and geography. Furthermore, through a questionnaire (HSR#: HS 09-926), I will determine the extent to which elementary teacher education candidates at NMU perceive their content knowledge in social studies.  

Name: K. C. Holder
Department: Education
Project Title: Charter school monitoring: Constituents’ value of processes and products
Project Abstract: The purpose of this study is to describe NMU Charter School constituents’ value of the monitoring process (on-site visit) and monitoring product (report). The study will fill a void where evidence of constituent value and utilization of monitoring is virtually non-existent. Every year, all five NMU Charter schools are monitored by the NMU Charter School Office. The monitoring process includes a one- or two-day on-site visit in which interviews, classroom observations and document analysis occur. The on-site visit data is then compiled into a monitoring report (25-40 page document) which includes compilations of data and recommendations for school improvement. The report is presented to both the charter school board and administration of each school. This study aims at surveying all administrators and school board members and conducting focus groups about specific components of the on-site visit and report to determine their perceived value in overall school improvement.

Name: David Houston Wood
Department: English
Project Title: Disabling the Renaissance: Recovering Disability in Early Modern Europe
Project Abstract: Drawing upon my recent work in both early modern and disability studies, I propose to utilize NMU’s Reassigned Time Award this Winter semester 2010 to lay the groundwork for the editing a publication of a ground breaking collection of essay that will serve as a bellwether for significant contribution to both of these fields. My recent scholarship involves directly the precise focus of this collection: My Spring 2009 co-chairing of a specialist seminar at the Shakespeare Association of America; and my Fall 2009 coediting of a special issue (consisting of an introduction and 6 essays) of the journal Disability Studies Quarterly entitled “Disabled Shakespeares.” Both are the first efforts internationally to imbricate these two vital areas of academic interest. In order to remain at the forefront of this newly emerging field, I plan with this collection to provide a venue for the many, many scholars with an interest in early modern disability studies working across a range of different European traditions and authors. I plan on a final collection of 18-20 essays, and plan to pursue publication with the largest name in the field of disability studies to date: the University of Michigan Press’s series entitled “Corporealities: Discourses of Disability.” 

 

Name: Gabriel Brahm
Department: English
Project Title: Anti-American Studies
Project Abstract: I propose to continue work on my book manuscript -Anti-American Studies: Culture and Disiplinarity Post-9/11- by producing two new chapters, first as conference talks, then as essays submitted to journals, and finally as integrated sections of the book, to be completed as a whole by spring of 2011. A planned chapter on popular culture (focusing on the “micro-politics” of civility and identity in the television comedies of Larry David) complements a chapter on larger, more macro-political, controversies (charges that “Neoconservatives” were inspired by long-dead political philosopher, Leo Strauss, to pursue the Iraq War). The psychoanalytic literary/cultural theories of Jacques Lacan and Slavoj Zizek provide a methodology capable of tracking the circulation of ideological fantasy through networks of signification the transgress boundaries between “high” and “low” culture, art, scholarship, mass media, and the public sphere of domestic and international relations in the age of globalization. With adequate time free from other responsibilities, I plan to participate in meetings of the Cultural Studies Association, the Midwest Political Science Association, and to respond affirmatively to a request by Alan Johnson, editor of Dissent, that I submit an essay to that fine journal (please see his letter, attached). Examination of anxieties about America’s role in the world and Jews’ role in America link these chapters together substantively. My interdisciplinary approach combines literary studies, ethnic/Jewish studies, American Studies and political theory, to investigate virulent prejudices against tl~ U.S. and Israel.

Name: Catherine Terwilliger
Department: English
Project Title: Hen Book Proposal
Project Abstract: The goal of this project is to create a marketable book proposal, including an outline and at least one sample chapter. The intended book comprises a creative study of the laying hen that is part journalism and part literary nonfiction. The subject is timely because of a recent resurgence of interest in the common historical practice of keeping backyard flocks, a trend which has been widely documented but which has not yet produced a book of the kind suggested. As a veteran award-winning journalist and poultry enthusiast, I am ideally qualified to conduct this project, which aligns with three of Ernest Boyer’s four forms of scholarship:
-Discovery: This project requires me to build new knowledge through library and online research, as well as interviews with avian physiologists, veterinarians and behaviorists.
-Integration: This project requires 11eto make connections across disciplines both in content (scientific and creative) and style (journalistic and literary).
-Application: Because laying hens remain primarily an agribusiness commodity, the vast majority are slaughtered after a short productive life (1-2 years). Consequently, little is known about the physiology and psychology of older hens which make up the majority of backyard flocks and which often acquire the status of pets. In addition to being a creative work, the book envisioned by this project will fill a void in the literature for poultry hobbyists and veterinarians who wish to better understand the backyard laying hen.

Name: Erich Ottem
Department: Biology
Project Title: Establishment of Transgenic Mouse Colonies for Use in Neuromuscular Disease Research
Project Abstract: The focus of my research involves determining the role that a protein, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays in the onset of neuromuscular diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Specifically, my work focuses on the contribution of BDNF synthesized by muscles to the health and maintenance of motorneurons. My previous research at Michigan State University lead to the creation of a transgenic line of mice that are missing BDNF in muscles only and that may serve as a new and promising model for ALS investigations. To continue this research at Northern Michigan University, I must establish two separate transgenic colonies of mice that will be cross-bred to generate experimental animals that are missing muscular BDNF. After experimental mice are generated, I will then begin my research project that will focus on the function of muscular BDNF in the health of motorneurons and the disease processes that are induced in its absence. If granted this award, I will have the time necessary to establish the two transgenic colonies required to generate experimental animals. In addition, as part of the award, I will be actively involved in training two graduate students in colony management, genotyping, and animal husbandry. Experimental animals generated from the colonies will also serve as research models for these students’ graduate theses. Receiving this Reassigned Time Award is critical for me to begin my scholarly research at NMU.

 

Name: Michael Joy
Department: Modern Languages and Literature
Project Title: Emblematic Imagery in the Dracula manual 1 A Cervantine Reading of The Wrestler.
Project Abstract: I will use this Reassigned Time Award to complete two already-begun research projects and submit papers based on these projects to scholarly journals. The first project is an article analyzing the impact of European emblem books (sixteenth- and seventeenth- century educational treatises combing words and images) on the work of influential Spanish essayist Baltasar Gracian (1601-1658). Specifically, Gracian’s Dracula manual (published in English as The Art of Worldly Wisdom) relies on imagery from the emblem books, and uses emblematic structures to guide readers in the creation of their public images, and to ultimately assure those readers of political success.
            The second project is a study of the award-winning film The Wrestler (2008), using Miguel de Cervates’s novel Don Quijote (1605/1615) as a useful analytical framework. Both film and novel feature aging protagonists who seek to recover a lost (perhaps mythical) “golden age” in which their particular ideals of masculinity, courage, and heroism are restored. Both protagonists, likewise, must deal with their own physical decay, psychological problems, and ostracism from modern society.
            The Gracian paper is an expansion and reshaping of a chapter of my dissertation; I already have a completed draft of the article and now need time to focuses on revisions. The Wrestler project was the subject of a presentation I gave at a conference earlier this month; therefore, I already have approximately one-third of an article-length draft. I would use this award to finish both projects and to submit articles based on those projects to scholarly journals.

 

Name: Lesley Larkin
Department: English
Project Title: Book Proposal: “And in this Task We Create the Self: Reading Race and Twentieth-Century African American Literature
Project Abstract:”And in this Task We Create the Self”: Reading Race and Twentieth-Century African American Literature is a book-length work of literary criticism that elucidates the critical interventions made by twentieth-century African American writers (including James Weldon Johnson, Zora [N]eale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, and Jamaica Kincaid) into scholarly and popular practices of reading race. My central thesis is that modern African American literature, which rearticulates the significance of literacy asserted in the slave narrative through ongoing debates about how to represent blackness for a primarily white audience, is specially suited to a thorough investigation of reading race. My primary goal is to re-read major literary works by modern African American writers for their opposition to dominant reading practices in order to identify alternative, ethically sound reading practices useful to both critics and teachers. This project is based on work begun in my PhD dissertation (completed in December 2007). If granted a Reassigned Time Award, during Winter Semester 2010 I will revise the introduction and conclusion of my manuscript, draft a new chapter on reading whiteness, research potential publisher, and write a book proposal.

 

Name: Robert Legg
Department: Geography
Project Title: Updating GIS at NMU, a response to the rapid develop[ment]s and future change in this field.
Project Abstract: This goal of this project is to research and implement developments for the Geographic Information Science (GIS) major, in response to the current needs of teaching, research and society in general. To carry out this project the applicant will undertake several scholarly tasks. These tasks will include a preparation of a research article for peer review, submission of a NSF grant proposal (Funding Opportunity Number: PD-98-1352) attend the national GIS user’s conference and organize a local GIS user’s conference to offer local GIS professionals, students and educators an opportunity for discussion and information exchange.

 

Name: Hsin-Ling Hsieh
Department: Economics
Project Title: Panel Co-integration Analysis of Cigarette Taxes and Health: the Case of Respiratory Cancers
Project Abstract: The goal of this project is using an advanced econometric technique to explore the long-term relationship between the cigarette excise tax and respiratory cancers. It can help policy makers evaluate to what extent the cigarette tax serves as an effective means of improving public health in the long run. It is an ongoing project conducted by my co-authors Dr. Echu Liu, Dr. Wei-Choun Yu, and me. Existing literature in this line of research indicates inconsistent finding. One explanation of the inconsistency is the “non-stationarity” of the date series. In order to solve this problem and present a more accurate estimate of the health benefits associated with taxation on cigarettes, we extend the study of Moore (1996) by introducing three innovations to this line of research. First, we explicitly consider the non-stationarity of data to avoid incorrect inferences. Second, we perform a co-integration analysis to estimate the long-term effect of cigarette taxation on respiratory cancers. Third, our analysis covers the period 1954-2005, a longer and more up-to-date time span than that in Moore (1996). In the progress of completing this research, I will be the main person in charge of collecting data and conducting the analysis. The advanced panel co-integration technique of Pedroni (1999, 2000, 2004) will be applied to the analysis. A release time of four credits in Winter 2010 is requested. No special equipment is required. I expect to submit the completed paper to a peer-reviewed journal in June 2010.