Grants and Contracts

Our role in the pursuit of sponsored programs

The NMU Grants and Contracts Office has central responsibility for proposal submission and award management for sponsored research, scholarship, instructional and other sponsored activities at Northern Michigan University. The office also bears responsibility for research compliance as it relates to activities supported by external funds. The Grants and Contracts Office balances service to faculty and staff with strict adherence to university, federal and sponsor agency regulations and policies.

That balance guides the office in its mission to support faculty, staff and students in applying for internal and external funds for all sponsored activities and managing awarded projects, bringing integrity, clarity and ease to sponsored programs grant administration processes at NMU.Through these activities the Grants and Contracts Office guides the university’s research and sponsored activity endeavors on a forward path to fostering effective scholarly research, program development and student success.

Learn more about our support of sponsored programs.

Internal Opportunities

Internal funding for Northern Michigan University faculty, staff and students exists to enhance the academic experience and professional growth by providing financial support for new initial research projects, scholarly activities, papers for publication and creative works. More information and deadlines.

Upcoming Events and Deadlines

National Science Foundation Student Fellowship workshop - Sept. 25, for additional information on this opportunity for seniors and graduate students, please click here.

The Basics of Proposal Writing Series has been announced and the first session is Sept. 29.  To learn more about this four part series and to sign up, please click here.

Faculty Grants/Internal Funding - Sept. 30  Join us to learn more about the internal funding opportunities at NMU.  For additional information click here.


Grants and Contracts News

NMU's Whalen awarded prestigious NEH grant

Robert Whalen, an English professor at Northern Michigan University, has been awarded a $250,000 National Endowment for the Humanities Scholarly Editions Grant. The money will be used to support lead editor Whalen and his co-editor, Christopher Hodgkins of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG), in producing George Herbert: Complete Prose, with Latin and Greek Verse... more.


NMU's Student Support Services receives new TRIO grant

Student Support Services received a $300,249 award from the Department of Education in July to continue offering the service program to eligible students. Each year around 50.5% of NMU undergraduates are eligible for SSS programs.

This 5-year award is to support programmatic expenses related to the NMU Student Support Services Program, which serves First Generation, Low Income and Students with Disabilities. Student Support Services is a comprehensive support program that assists first-generation, low-income students and students with disabilities with earning their baccalaureate degree. The Student Support Services staff is committed to helping all participants achieve their educational and personal goals. Participants receive comprehensive advisement, academic support services, access to cultural and leadership activities and assistance to make a positive transition to university life at NMU.


NMU announces "PRIME" new funding opportunity

NMU is proud to announce a new internal funding opportunity: the Northern PRIME Fund: Progressive Research and Innovative Mutual Exploration.

This is an interdisciplinary program offering up to $20,000 for a one year project. It places a heavy emphasis on student involvement and subsequent efforts to seek external funding.

The due date for the first round of PRIME awards is July 1, 2015. For details visit the website:


Recently Submitted Proposals

Julie Bowerman submitted a proposal to the US Dept. of Education for the Upward Bound Math-Science Program. The Upward Bound Program offers a Summer Program that engrosses students in an unforgettable six-week educational experience. Program participants will be exposed to a variety of career fields, improve problem-solving skills and enrich their appreciation for science and mathematics through hands-on projects. They will also have the opportunity to take an educational trip the end of their summer experience. Students will experience adventure and develop lasting new friendships through the Program.

Emily Lanctot submitted a proposal to the National Endowment for the Arts for the DeVos Art Museum. This grant helps support increased audience engagement by documenting, cataloging and researching 430 Japanese woodblock prints, and wood, metal and ceramic objects from the 19-20 century. This grant will allow the DeVos Museum to update digital images, hire a scholar to research the collection and update software to move the catalog to a database with public access.

April Lindala submitted two proposals to the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) for the Center for Native American Studies. One request is to support the Native American Student Association with the 23rd annual "Learning to Walk Together" traditional pow wow and feast, which will be held in March 2016.  The pow wow is the only one of its kind hosted in the Marquette area, and serves as a great location to preserve, promote and share Native American culture within the local community. The second request was submitted to establish a Native American Student Empowerment Initiative. Nearly nine years ago with staff and students began looking at how to make NMU a more welcoming environment. The concept of "building community" for Native American students through interactions with community members by offering cultural or social events was born, and the groundwork for the Native American Student Empowerment Initiative was laid. Funding will assist in continuing to build connections through events such as a baby moccasin making workshop, travel to the KBIC Department of Natural Resources, the KBIC Sugar Bush and other events.

Chris Standerford submitted a proposal to receive funds from the Michigan STEM Partnership for his Coding and Circuits for Cultivating Potential and Opportunity for Students (C3PO) program. C3PO aims to increase student interest and engagement in STEM Education by involving both teachers and students in creative problem solving experiences that utilize technology. Teachers will involve students in a project-based challenge, utilizing open source coding and hardware inventor’s kits. The program will culminate with a display of student work where community leaders gain knowledge about the learning process.

Carole Touchinski submitted a proposal to the Superior Health Foundation for support of Dental Day for Marquette and Baraga County residents. This clinic will provide compassionate care to uninsured working poor who do not qualify for health assistance programs and underinsured individuals. Clients will be provided with free oral health services and will receive free education about resources in the community.

The WNMU-TV Team submitted a proposal to receive continued support from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting for the distribution of the University Public Television station. The support will augment the capacity of WNMU-TV to expand and maintain the broadcast of digital public television and aide in a wider digital program offering to the WNMU-TV Broadcast community.


NMU receives funds for student led project, invasive species control, bacteria identification and more

Faculty and staff at NMU earned nearly $164,000 in newly awarded funds in April 2015.

Rachel Harris will direct a student-led project (headed by Lindsey Lieck) funded by a $400 award from Sodexo Foundation, Youth Service America. The project involves gathering food donations to contribute to families in need so hungry children will have nutritious food on weekends.

Jill Leonard will direct a contract agreement project with the Alger County Conservation District, in the amount of $32,000, for the Central UP invasive plant prevention and control project.

Yu Liu received $55,000 from the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund for a project titled Supramolecular Catalyst Assembled Through Aromatic Donor-Acceptor Interaction and Its Application in Hydrolytic Kinetic Resolution of Epoxides.

Lori Nelson of the Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences Program garnered a $37,000 award from the Marquette County Community Fund to upgrade the equipment for its clinical video observation recording system.

Heather Pickett, director of the McNair Scholars Program, was awarded $213,180 from U.S. Department of Education. The Program is designed to increase graduate rates and post-baccalaureate success among first generation, low income students and students who come from a minority population that is underrepresented in graduate education. The McNair Scholars Program strives to provide students with the information and experiences that will make their graduate school transition easier and more rewarding. 

Josh Sharp received a $2,000 award from Microimaging Technologies (MIT) for a project to test the feasibility of immunomagnetic isolation of bacteria to quickly isolate and enrich target bacteria species for analysis in the MIT1000 equipment. This award will support continued collaborative work Sharp is involved in with MIT.

Chris Standerford, director of the Glenn T. Seaborg Math and Science Center, will lead a contractual project ($10,000) with Oakland Schools to coordinate the activities in the Upper Peninsula region. The project involves Modeling Instruction in the High School Physics program.

Susy Ziegler of the Earth, Environment, and Geographical Sciences Department was awarded a $26,905 subaward agreement from Michigan State University, for a silvicultural system for conserving biodiversity and enhancing ecosystem services in xeric jack pine forests of the Great Lakes States. The subaward is part of a larger grant project led by MSU funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.