Special Topics and Course Descriptions

EN 410/505 GENRES OF WRITING - SUMMER 2015 (Online)

Instructor: Josh MacIvor-Andersen; jmacivor@nmu.edu

 

This is a nonfiction reading/writing class that will explore a diversity of “immersion” articles and books, stories that required the writer to become embedded in the middle of the drama in order to write from that vantage point. It is belly of the beast writing, insider writing, spongy absorption writing that requires eyes wide open and pen flying in real time. Think Hunter S. Thompson infiltrating the Hells Angels (before getting stomped back out again) or Katherine Boo living in a Mumbai slum dutifully recording everything she saw and heard--for four years.

 

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EN311Z: World Literature: Vietnam - Fall 2015
Instructor:  Will Arighi

It has been forty years since the end of the Vietnam War, a decade-long struggle that produced deep divisions within American as well as Vietnamese society. Though we are increasingly asking those US veterans who remain to share their stories, the thoughts, memories, and histories of the Vietnamese people are still largely outside of our knowledge. This course will seek to understand modern Vietnamese society through its literature, beginning with a brief look at one of Vietnam’s most famous early narratives, The Tale of Kieu, and then examining novels, poems and short stories from the period of French colonialism to the Vietnam War and its aftermath. Throughout the course, we will try to understand how a country that has been so ravaged by colonial wars and revolutions can now be one of the world’s fastest growing economies and most populous nations.

 

 

EN 350: MATERIALS AND METHODS OF TEACHING ENGLISH - FALL 2015

Instructor: Kia Richmond; krichmon@nmu.edu

 

Secondary Education students with a major or minor in English Ed who are planning to student teach in the Winter 2016 term should take this course during the Fall 2015 term. The course is tentatively scheduled for Monday and Wednesday nights from 6-7:40 p.m.

 

In order to register for EN 350, please email Dr. Kia Jane Richmond at krichmon@nmu.edu with the following information:

• Name and email

• Phone/cell #

• Major/minor

• Accepted to Methods? YES/NO

• Passed MTTC Basic Skills Test/Professional Readiness Examination?    YES/NO

• Planning to student teach Winter 2016? YES/NO

• Where might you like to student teach if given an option? : Marquette County, Other U.P. County, Wisconsin County, Downstate, Overseas or other state

 

 

EN 495W: EMBODIED WRITING WORKSHOP - FALL 2015 

Instructor: Heidi Stevenson; hstevens@nmu.edu

 

Students will engage in writing, physical activity, discussion, and reading designed to cultivate a deep understanding of their own individual embodied perspectives and how such perspectives contribute to all thinking, writing, and reading. Students will produce and continue to develop several embodied inquiry papers.

 

While the course will include some physical activity, anyone in any physical condition can safely and effectively participate.

 

EN560 LITERARY MOVEMENTS: APARTHEID AND POST-APARTHEID SOUTH AFRICAN LITERATURE - FALL 2015

Instructor: Jaspal Singh; jsingh@nmu.edu

 

This course examines apartheid legacy in a number of South African texts as characters grapple with the very difficult task of sculpting national as well as personal identities in apartheid and post-apartheid South Africa.  Apartheid (or “separate development”), enacted in 1948, institutionalized racism.  Through literature, we will examine various Acts, such as the Population Registration Act, the Group Area Act, the Bantu Homelands Citizen Act, the Pass System, the Public Safety Act, the Criminal Law Amendment Act, to name but a few, to discuss their impact on South African identity formation. The texts deal with resistance to apartheid policies, ranging from students’ movements to collective action by women, from violence, strikes, demonstrations, to sabotage, which were met with severe penalties and imprisonment. This course is especially designed for students to tackle issues of oppression, resistance, forgiveness and reconciliation to colonial/apartheid ideological constructions of identity in apartheid and post-apartheid South African literature.

 

Required Texts:

Literature:

J.M. Coetzee, Waiting for the Barbarians

Alan Patan, Cry, the Beloved Country

Rajendra Chetty, Ed., Vintage Book of South African Indian Writing

Gobodo-Madikezela, A Human Being Died That Night

Zakes Mda, Ways of Dying

Phaswane Phe, Welcome to Out Hillbrow

Theoretical:

Albert Memmi, The Colonizer and the Colonized

Ashcroft, et al., The Post-colonial Studies Reader

Films:

Cry, the Beloved Country

Cry, Freedom!

Forgiveness!

Sarafing

Long Night's Journey Into Day

Disgrace

 

EN 590: BRITISH WRITING OF WORLD WAR TWO AND THE AFTERMATH - FALL 2015

Instructor: Caroline Krzakowski; ckrzakow@nmu.edu

 

This seminar will trace the British literary and cinematic response to World War Two, from the first rumblings of war in the mid 1930s to the Phoney War, the Blitz, through to the postwar period. We will read a variety of fictional and non-fictional texts, listen to BBC broadcasts, and screen key films. We will question the commonplace belief that World War Two “exhausted” British literature, and that as a result, the postwar period saw a literature of retreat. We will also examine the complicated relationship between literature, poetics, form, and politics in wartime and think about questions of literary and cinematic representation of catastrophe.

 

Required Texts:

Texts:

Isaiah Berlin, Four Essays on Liberty (1958; 1969)

Elizabeth Bowen, The Demon Lover, Selected BBC Radio presentations (1945-1960)

Winston Churchill, Selected Speeches (1939-1949)

Graham Greene, The Ministry of Fear (1943)

Storm Jameson, Europe to Let (1940)

John Le Carre, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1963)

George Orwell, Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949)

W.G. Sebald, Austerlitz (2001)

Muriel Spark, The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1961)

Evelyn Waugh, Brideshead Revisited (1945)

Rebecca West, Selections from Black Lamb and Grey Falcon (1941) and The Meaning of Treason (1947)

Virginia Woolf, Three Guineas (1938)

Selected Critical and Theoretical texts (available on EduCat)

Film:

Fires Were Started, Dir. Humphrey Jennings

The Third Man, Dir. Carol Reed

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold, Dir. Martin Ritt

Foreign Correspondent, Dir. Alfred Hitchcock

 

EN 595: SPECIAL TOPICS: MULTIMODAL PEDAGOGY  - Fall 2015
(Online, but also meets the following Saturdays from 12-3:20: Aug. 29, Oct. 17, Dec. 5)

Instructor: Liz Monske; emonske@nmu.edu

 

Theory, research, and praxis of multimodal pedagogy will be examined. Discussions will include what can be done with one computer, a classroom of computers, or a classroom without walls, since not all campuses are as technologically rich as NMU. As a group, the class will examine and utilize free and for-profit software programs/apps and look at their applications in the writing classrooms. 

 

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EN 595 / EN 495 / AD 495 — SPECIAL TOPICS: LITERATURE AND PHOTOGRAPHY - WINTER 2016

Instructors: Professor Russell Prather, Department of  English rprather@nmu.edu

& Associate Professor Christine Flavin,  Department of Art and Design cflavin@nmu.edu

 

Description.  Photographic historian Helmut Gernsheim described the timing of the invention of photography in the early nineteenth century as “the greatest mystery in its history.” The mystery is why there was such a surge of interest in the medium at that particular historical moment, even though photography’s optical and chemical principles had been known already for some time. This interdisciplinary course begins by grappling with this mystery, considering specifically how Romantic literary and visual sensibilities at the turn of the eighteenth century may have spurred on the nascent medium of photography. The course will then go on to consider not only how photography was influenced but how in turn it informed and altered precepts and practices of literature (as well as painting) over the course of the nineteenth century.  The seminar will end with an examination of the role of photography in early twentieth century literary Modernism.

 

Texts. Readings (poetry and prose, writings by artists, journal entries, letters and notes, contemporary theory and criticism) will be drawn primarily from the course texts listed below, with additional material (selected photographs, paintings, and literary texts) posted on EduCat.

 

Literature and Photography: Interactions 1840-1990: A Critical Anthology, Jane M. Rabb, ed.

?- Classic Essays on Photography, Alan Trachtenberg, ed.

?- Geoffrey Batchen, Each Wild Idea

 

Assignments for the course may include short response papers, a longer argument-driven essay or research-based presentation and a creative project in which students will be asked to create a work that combines verbal and visual elements.  An optional course trip to —two weeks in Britain and France, to visit a sequence of significant sites in the history of nineteenth century literature and photography—is also being considered for May 2016.    

programs