Freshmen Fellows work alongside criminal justice faculty

An elite group of 40 incoming students have been selected to participate in the Freshman Fellowship program for the 2010-11 school years. Three of these 40 students have been selected to participate in the criminal justice department's special projects.

Ian HelselIan Helsel, from Lansing, Michigan, is one of these freshman fellows working along side mentor and department head, Dr. Dale Kapla. Ian is focusing on research provided by staff, faculty and students to help support whether or not it is constitutional to disallow guns on campus. Most of the research, however, comes from the Supreme Court cases, state bills, and opinions of lawmakers.   Helsel says, “I enjoy the program; I think it is really cool that we have these opportunities. I am glad to be a part of Freshman Fellows.”

Amanda HardyAmanda Hardy, from Racine, Wisconsin had always had a passion for Criminal Justice ,but doesn’t know where to go from here. Being a part of the freshman fellowship team may guide her in the right direction. Paired with Dr. Dale Kapla, Amanda is currently working on training drug dogs with a machine to cut out human trainers because of cost and time.   “Working with Dr. Kapla has been nice,” says Hardy. “The studies I’m working on are enjoyable because it works into criminal justice and my passion for the field.”

Catherine BrownKatherine Brown is working alongside Professor Steven Snowaert. Katie has taken a roll in one of Snowaert’s classes lending a hand when needed. Katie helps prepare labs, jumps into groups when needed, and assists in cleaning up. Even though Katie is now a pre-med major her passion for criminal justice shines through. She has been able to participate in a finger print and impression analysis lab and has even sat in an interrogation room.  “I have learned a lot and I am glad I am in this program,” said Brown.

The Freshman Fellowship Program was launched in the fall of 1995 under the leadership of Dr. Karen Reese, vice president for Student Affairs. The pilot program began in 1995 and had five fellows. The experience was to provide academically talented students with the opportunity to understand and practice research while working with a university professor on a research project. For their research efforts, students were paid a stipend of $1,000 for the academic year. The Freshman Fellowship Program has grown over the years to serve well over 30 fellows. The Freshman Fellowship Program has resulted in better educated students and students who graduate and enter the world of work with a competitive advantage. 

Click here to learn more about the Freshmen Fellows program and how to apply.

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