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 2002-2003
Undergraduate Bulletin

 
 
 

Course Descriptions

   
 

This section lists updated descriptions for all university courses; the descriptions appear in alphabetical order according to their course letter designations.  These descriptions include any prerequisites (requirements students must satisfy before registering for the course), corequisites (requirements students must satisfy while taking the course), the amount of credit hours applied for each course, and, where relevant, the hours devoted to lecture, discussion, and laboratory (see applicable department sections for the total credits required for each major or program).  If no indication exists for lecture, discussion and laboratory hours, then the course is considered a lecture.

Students should be aware that the courses listed here are subject to change.  Many courses are regularly offered in the fall, while others are offered in the winter or summer.  However, semester enrollment, course demand, changes in faculty and other factors will sometimes affect the offering of courses.  In addition, new courses may have been added and changes in existing courses may have occurred since the printing of this bulletin.

When planning a semester program, students should contact the applicable departments for information regarding course offerings.

Some of the upper-level courses listed here can also apply toward graduate credit.  See the Northern Michigan University Graduate Bulletin or contact the College of Graduate Studies for more information.

Courses indicated in italics can be used to satisfy liberal studies requirements.

ACT

(College of Business–Accounting)

ACT 201 Practical Accounting Procedures

4 cr.

Study of basic principles and procedures in clerical, technical, or secretarial fields. This course will emphasize recording business transactions and completion of the accounting cycle, uses of special journals, and preparation of financial statements, work sheets, payroll, and other records.

Note: Not acceptable as an elective for students who complete ACT 230 and ACT 240.

ACT 202 Accounting Concepts for Management

4 cr.

Introduction to accounting concepts and the utilization of accounting in the decision making process.

Note: Not acceptable as an elective for students who complete ACT 230 and ACT 240.

ACT 230 Principles of Accounting I

3 cr.

Prerequisite: MA 103 or equivalent.

Study of basic accounting principles and recording procedures with in-depth analysis of income and expense recognition, and the non-owners’ equity portions of the balance sheet.

ACT 240 Principles of Accounting II

3 cr.

Prerequisite: ACT 230.

Further study of financial accounting topics, including owners’ equity concepts, income tax accounting, statement of changes in financial position, statement analysis, and interpretation. Managerial accounting topics are introduced: cost accounting systems, responsibilities accounting, budgeting concepts, cost-volume-profit analysis, and capital budgeting.

ACT 301 Financial Accounting I

4 cr.

Prerequisite: ACT 240.

Intensive study of the accounting cycle and the asset section of the balance sheet.

ACT 302 Financial Accounting II

4 cr.

Prerequisite: ACT 301.

Intensive study of the liability and owners’ equity sections of the balance sheet and the treatment of special problem areas in accounting.

ACT 311 Cost Accounting

4 cr.

Prerequisite: ACT 240.

Development of an understanding of cost accounting as an information system designed to provide data for (1) inventory valuation and income determination, (2) planning and controlling routine operations, and (3) non-routine decisions.

ACT 314 Management Accounting

4 cr.

May not be applied toward a bachelor degree in accounting.

Prerequisite: ACT 240.

Survey of managers’ interpretation and use of accounting data in setting plans and objectives, in controlling operations, and in making the decisions involved with management of an enterprise. Designed for undergraduate business administration students who do not major in accounting.

ACT 321 Federal Income Taxation

4 cr.

Prerequisite: ACT 240.

This course studies the basics of federal income taxation for individuals. Tax policy considerations and historical developments are studied to the extent that they aid comprehension of current law. Many of the basic rules apply to corporations, partnerships and trusts as well. This course explores the major topical areas: basic tax model, gross income, deductions, alternative minimum tax, basics of property, nontaxable exchanges, capital gains and losses, depreciation recapture and deferred compensation.

ACT 325 Financial Management for Entrepreneurship

3 cr.

Prerequisites: Completion of the business core, relevant business experience, or approval of the Entrepreneurship Development Program Committee.

Builds upon the basic introductory material of Principles of Accounting I and II. Topics include business taxes, cash flow forecasting, and cost analysis. This course is not an appropriate elective for an accounting major.

ACT 403 Accounting III

4 cr.

Prerequisites: ACT 302, ACT 311, and ACT 321, junior standing or permission of instructor.

The third course in the financial accounting sequence (ACT 301, 302, 403), covering special problem areas in accounting and introducing the student to accounting principles and procedures for governmental units, hospitals, colleges and universities. Also included: accounting for business combinations, partnerships, branch accounting, and multinational accounting problems.

ACT 412 Advanced Cost Accounting

3 cr.

Prerequisites: ACT 311 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Study of managerial accounting as an information system designed to provide data for (1) non-routine decisions, (2) policy making, and (3) long-range planning.

ACT 422 Advanced Federal Taxation

3 cr.

Prerequisites: ACT 321 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

This course applies the basics of income taxation learned in the first tax course to corporations, partnerships, estates and trusts. Topics also include professional tax practice considerations and family tax planning. Practical experience in the preparation of tax forms will also be gained.

ACT 431 Accounting Information Systems

3 cr.

Prerequisites: ACT 240, CIS 110 or equivalent IS courses and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Study of the concepts of information and the systems approach as well as the techniques and tools of systems analysis and design. Emphasis upon transaction processing, controls, flow charting techniques, and accounting situations involving electronic computing systems. Many problems and cases are adapted from CPA and CMA examinations.

ACT 441 Auditing

4 cr.

Prerequisites: ACT 302,  ACT 311 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Review of audit concepts, standards, and procedures; ethics and legal requirements; scope, objectives and nature of an audit; management of an audit, and modern audit techniques. Statistical sampling in auditing; audits of electronic systems; auditors’ role in tax and management advisory services.

ACT 443 Fraud Examination

4 cr.

Prerequisite: ACT 441 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

To raise the student's awareness of the accountant's opportunities in fraud investigation and detection and to bring the student to the point where he or she can make an informed decision whether or not they want to pursue a career as a certified fraud examiner.

ACT 482 Accounting for Non-Profit Enterprises

3 cr.

Prerequisites: ACT 301 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Accounting principles and procedures for governmental units, hospitals, colleges, and universities.

ACT 484 Current Developments in Accounting

3 cr.

Prerequisites: Senior standing accounting major or permission of instructor.

Historical and current developments in accounting research and theory. Controversial topics related in contemporary literature.

ACT 488 CPA/CMA Problems

3 cr.

Prerequisites: Senior standing accounting major and College of Business permission.

Selected problems from CPA examinations; analysis and revision of statements, partnerships, corporations, quasi-organizations, mergers and conglomerates; financial accounting theory, ethics, auditing, law, advanced cost and marginal analysis, and federal taxation programs.

ACT 491 Internship in Accounting

1-4 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: College of Business permission and junior standing.

Professional experience for qualified accounting and finance students. Working relationships will be established with accounting firms and other business organizations. Students are required to write a paper, and will be evaluated by their faculty supervisor in consultation with the employer. Generally, a minimum of 40 hours of internship will be required for each credit hour; however, most students will intern most of a summer or semester and earn 4 credit hours.

Credit hours are over and above any existing catalog requirements for the accounting degree.

ACT 495 Variable Topics in Accounting

1-4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

Variable topics of current interest.

ACT 498 Directed Study in Accounting

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

Independent study of some special problem in accounting under the guidance of a faculty member. This study is limited to students with superior grade point averages.

AD

(Art and Design Department)

Cognate Courses

AD 160 Physical Structures and Concepts

4 cr.

Introduction to the methods of construction and production of art forms within a societal context.  The course includes the study of materials, tools, assembly procedures and the application of such forms.

AD 175 Visual Structures and Concepts

4 cr.

Study of pattern and color in relation to visual perception and communication. Visual patterns, color qualities, and their application are examined.

AD 270 Social Structures and Concepts

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 160 and AD 175.

Comparative study of cultural products, social structures, and visual conditioning and its evolution in contemporary society. Students are required to participate in a class field trip to Chicago or Minneapolis which involves a substantial fee to cover travel expenses.

AD 360 Methodology and Visual Form

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 203 and AD 270.

Examination of mechanics, optics, and material characteristics, and their relationship to the physical form of objects.

AD 375 Perception and Visual Form

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 203 and AD 270.

Examination of the interaction of psychological and social psychological data and how this applies to visual communication. Students analyze concepts of color, form, and social meaning in relation to their major studio area and production of studio work.

AD 470 Value and Visual Form

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 203 and AD 270.

The identification of personal and social values as they relate to the production of art derived from critical, theoretical, and philosophical sources.

Art History Courses

AD 200 Native American Art and Architecture

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of visual and performing arts requirement.

Satisfies the world cultures requirement.

Prerequisite: EN 111 recommended.

A study of the issues current in the field dealing specifically with objects and artifacts that express cultural concepts in visual form and the built environment from precontact times to the present. A contextual approach will be used to analyze traditional and contemporary material produced by the Anishinabe and Haudenosaunee as well as other indigenous groups in the areas of the U.S. and Canada.

AD 250 History of Western Art and Architecture

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of visual and performing arts requirement.

Surveys the history of the visual arts in the Western world from prehistoric times through the first half of the nineteenth century. The social contexts of art, aspects of form, the possible intentions of artists, and the theoretical underpinnings of artistic activity are examined.

AD 260 Why America Looks This Way

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of visual and performing arts requirement.

Survey of the ideas and events determining the appearances of our cities, countryside, industrial products, and homes.

AD 265 Art and Architecture of Japan

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of visual and performing arts requirement.

Satisfies the world cultures requirement.

A chronological survey of the visual arts in Japan from prehistory to the twentieth century. The course is organized according to the periods of Japanese political and cultural history. Covers the styles, media, and artists in Japanese art history and introduces the core aesthetic, religious, and ethical values that are expressed through Japanese art and architecture.

AD 300 Japan and the West: Crosscurrents in Art and Architecture

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of visual and performing arts requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Satisfies the world cultures requirement.

Prerequisites: Completion of the foundations of communication requirement and junior standing.

Investigates the mutual influence of Japanese and western art during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Considers technical, formal, and philosophical dimensions of this influence.  The focus of the course is Japan's impact on European and American modernist art. The course will lead to a general understanding and appreciation of intercultural processes in art.

AD 355 Twentieth Century Art and Architecture

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of visual and performing arts requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Prerequisites: Completion of the foundations of communication requirement and junior standing.

Survey of the visual arts and built environment in the Western world from the second half of the 19th century through the present decade.  The conceptual basis of the arts and their place in society is examined within an historical framework.

Areas of Concentration

Ceramics

AD 122 Ceramics: Handbuilding Techniques

4 cr.

Introduction to the methods and techniques of producing ceramic objects covering the various forming, finishing, and firing techniques.  Students experience techniques ranging from pinch, cool, and slab construction.

AD 222 Ceramics: Wheel Forms

4 cr.

Development of the traditional skills of throwing, along with glazing and firing procedures.  Supporting information is derived from historical and contemporary wheel thrown forms.

AD 322 Ceramics: Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 203, AD 122, and AD 222.

Production of a collection of ceramic pieces that combine traditional and experimental techniques to develop a personal approach toward the ceramic material.  The emphasis is on finishing and technical concerns related to clay/glaze formulation and firing procedures.

AD 422 Ceramics: Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 322 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Production of a body of work that supports the student’s personal concern for form. Individual solutions for construction and finishing are stressed with a focus on current trends and issues in ceramics.

AD 459 Ceramics: BFA Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 303,  AD 422  and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Continuation of the study of the ceramic process to develop a body of work representing a personal approach supported by ideological and theoretical sources.

Digital Cinema

AD 121 Digital Cinema: Introduction

4 cr.

Introduction to the physical aspects of digital video production. Screenings emphasize narrative features and shorts. Equipment is provided.

AD 221 Digital Cinema: Animation

4 cr.

Continued development of digital video production skills and knowledge emphasizing animation forms. Equipment is provided.

AD 321 Digital Cinema: Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 203 and AD 221.

Continued development of digital video production skills and knowledge emphasizing documentary forms. Students must have access to a camcorder.

AD 421  Digital Cinema: Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 321 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Continued development of digital video production skills and knowledge emphasizing a seminar project. Students must have access to a camcorder.

AD 458 Digital Cinema: BFA Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 303, AD 421 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Development of a portfolio presentation and an ideological statement.

Drawing and Painting

AD 114 Painting

4 cr.

Introduction to relevant concepts and techniques. A body of work is produced exploring several painting media, with an emphasis on oils.

AD 120 Drawing/Illustration

4 cr.

Introduction to methods and knowledge needed to create various types of spatial illusions and to provide cognate support for drawing.

AD 220 Drawing/Painting

4 cr.

Prerequisite: AD 120.

Development of techniques and skills related to all aspects of spatial illusions. Emphasis is placed on the importance of drawing as a basis for visual growth.

AD 320 Drawing/Painting/Papermaking: Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 203 and AD 220.

Production of a body of works demonstrating the student’s understanding of psychological and social aspects. Students may produce work in any combination of drawing, painting or papermaking.

AD 420 Drawing/Painting/Papermaking: Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 320 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Development of a body of work using a personal approach to image construction and emphasizing the ideological sources supporting the activity.

AD 457 Drawing/Painting: BFA Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 303, AD 420 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Production of a body of work that continues the development of ideological concerns.

Electronic Imaging

AD 134 Electronic Imaging: Introduction

4 cr.

Introduction to computer graphics hardware and software with the development of knowledge and skill in electronic image production. No previous computer experience required.

AD 234 Electronic Imaging: Digital Photography, Animation and Desktop Video

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 134 and AD 175.

Development of concepts and methods for electronic imaging using a variety of software. Techniques using resources from traditional media such as graphic design, illustration, painting, photography, and video are incorporated. Ideological issues concerning electronic imaging are presented.

AD 334 Electronic Imaging: Modeling, Rendering and Animation

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 203 and AD 234.

Development of concepts and methods for the modeling and animation of three-dimensional forms. Industry uses of modeling such as gaming, real-time rendering and time based narrative will be presented.

AD 434 Electronic Imaging: Interactive Multimedia and Web Site Design

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 203, AD 234 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Development of concepts and methods for interactive multimedia and web site design using a variety of software. Considerations for navigation, interactivity, and visual communication will be presented.

AD 467 Electronic Imaging: BFA Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 303, AD 430, AD 434 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Development of electronic imaging portfolio presentation and ideological statement. Self promotion with an emphasis on job search will be explored through the development of interactive media such as a web site.

Environmental Design

AD 129 Environmental Design: Image Basis

4 cr.

Introduction to methods and techniques of environmental and social goods design. Ideation and presentation procedures are stressed in studio work with an introduction to cognate aspects of interior and commercial design presented through lecture and discussion.

AD 229 Environmental Design: Physical Basis

4 cr.

Development of environmental and product problem solving techniques and the synthesis of sense impressions for personal and specialized public environments, interiors, and products. Studio work is oriented toward model building techniques and the basis of form presentations.

AD 329 Environmental Design: Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 129, AD 203, and AD 229.

Application of ideological and theoretical concepts to a contracted body of work. A written document of support is required.

AD 429 Environmental Design: Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 329 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Production of interior, environmental, or commercial site design solutions as an individual portfolio.

AD 466 Environmental Design: BFA Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 303, AD 429 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Continued development of ideological concerns and preparation of selected work for the professional portfolio.

Furniture Design

AD 124 Woodworking: Joinery and Greenwood

4 cr.

Introduction to traditional hand tool joinery and greenwood process through the production of social goods and the identification of a personal mode of practice.

AD 224 Woodworking: Turning and Bending

4 cr.

Introduction to wood turning and bending through the production of social goods and the identification of a personal mode of practice.

AD 326 Furniture Design: Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 124, AD 203 and AD 224.

Development of a professional portfolio and a written support paper. Emphasis is placed on understanding the various parameters of usefulness, cost and appearance that form the design program.

AD 426 Furniture Design: Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 326 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Continued development of a professional portfolio and written support paper from AD 326. Emphasis is placed on the application of ideology and theory.

AD 463 Furniture Design: BFA Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 303, AD 426 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Continued development of ideological and theoretical concerns. Emphasis is placed on preparing a selection of work as a professional portfolio and writing a paper supporting the activity.

Graphic Communication

AD 118 Introduction to Graphic Communication

4 cr.

Introduction to graphic communication concepts with the development of hand skills. Emphasis is placed on the use of process, pattern and color concepts.

AD 218 Graphic Communication: Studio Practices

4 cr.

Prerequisite: AD 118.

Introduction to the use of typography. Emphasis is placed on the use of process, letterform, layout and computer skills.

AD 318 Graphic Communication: Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 203 and AD 218.

A study of layout and design. Emphasis is placed on the use of process, design concept, complex layout and computer skills.

AD 418 Graphic Communication: Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 303, AD 318 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

A study of client-based graphic problems. Emphasis is placed on the use of process, market research, design concept, advanced layout and computer skills.

AD 455 Graphic Communication: BFA Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 303, AD 318 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

A study of self-promotion. Emphasis is placed on portfolio, job search and exhibition preparation.

Illustration

AD 120 Drawing/Illustration

4 cr.

Introduction to methods and knowledge needed to create various types of forms and spatial illusions.

AD 219 Illustration Forms

4 cr.

Study of illustration concepts and techniques. The focus is on studio production in book, magazine advertising, television and film illustration with an emphasis on color and linear perspective using a variety of media including computer imaging.

AD 319 Illustration: Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 203 and AD 219 with a “B” or better.

Development of a competitive professional portfolio with assignments that closely parallel illustration problems encountered in the profession. Two areas of illustration are chosen by the student stressing the interaction of image, color typography and social meaning.

AD 419 Illustration: Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 319 with a “B” or better and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Completion of a competitive professional portfolio focusing on one area of illustration with students choosing the concepts, themes and techniques. Illustration markets and career opportunities are investigated.

AD 456 Illustration: BFA Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 303, AD 419 with a “B” or better and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Study of image, color, typography and social meaning for the visual communication media. Students complete a professional portfolio demonstrating mastery of illustration problems in their chosen area.

Jewelry, Metalsmithing and Blacksmithing

AD 123 Jewelry/Metalsmithing

4 cr.

Introduction to methods, techniques and materials used to construct metal objects and jewelry. The course covers forming, soldering, cutting, forging, casting, fabricating metal and other materials in the production of jewelry/art.

AD 223 Blacksmithing/Metalsmithing

4 cr.

Development of skills and knowledge of basic blacksmithing in the production of utilitarian and non-utilitarian forged objects. Beginning through advanced techniques of forging hot steel are covered.

AD 323 Metalsmithing: Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 123, AD 175 and AD 223.

Production casting and mold-making techniques. Individualized research of casting processes in the production of jewelry and metal objects.

AD 423 Metalsmithing: Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 203, AD 323 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Sheet metal forming techniques:  raising, sinking, folding and construction. Production of a collection of work using these techniques as the foundation of the structures designed by each student.

AD 460 Metalsmithing: BFA Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 303, AD 423 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Continued development of ideological concerns in the production of studio art work as contracted with the instructor.

Photography

AD 117 Photography: Black and White

4 cr.

Introduction to the use of the camera, film processing, printing procedures and print presentation using black and white materials. Assignments and critiques introduce the student to ideology and problem-solving techniques. Each student must have access to a single reflex camera.

AD 217 Photography: Color

4 cr.

Prerequisite: AD 117.

Introduction to color photography using film and electronic media. Light and film, additive and subtractive color, print forms and print presentation are emphasized.

AD 317 Photography: Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 203 and AD 217.

Introduction of studio lighting (including tungsten and strobe lights) using black and white materials. Application of the    4 x 5 view camera for studio work is introduced. An emphasis is made on refinement of black and white print quality.

AD 417 Photography: Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 317 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Advanced studio application of the 4 x 5 view camera using color transparency. Utilization of the computer with photographic image making is presented. Students develop portfolios with an emphasis on continuity.

AD 454 Photography: BFA Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 303, AD 417 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Preparation of a professional portfolio by each student.

Printmaking

AD 115 Printmaking: Serigraphy and Intaglio

4 cr.

Introduction to the techniques of screen printing and the intaglio process (etching).  Emphasis is placed on skill development and the creation of original prints.

AD 215 Printmaking/Papermaking: Forms

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 115 or instructor permission.

Development of skills and techniques necessary in the creation of an original print. Emphasis is placed on one process: intaglio, screen, relief or lithography. Students may also explore hand papermaking emphasizing sheetmaking, beater techniques, coloring, casting or three-dimensional approaches.

AD 315 Printmaking/Papermaking: Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 203 and AD 215.

Continued development of studio skills using one process, with an emphasis on creating editions.

AD 415  Printmaking/Papermaking: Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 315 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Production of a body of work using one process, with an emphasis on development of a personal ideology.

AD 452 Printmaking/Papermaking: BFA Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 303, AD 415 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Production of a body of work and a support paper that continue the development of ideological concerns.

Product Design

Note: 100 and 200 level product design courses are not available; courses established through advisement.

AD 327 Product Design Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisite: AD 203.

Design and construction of full size working products as a portfolio and the writing of a support paper. Emphasis is placed on understanding the various parameters of usefulness, cost and appearance that form a design problem.

AD 427 Product Design: Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 327 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Continued development of a professional portfolio and written support paper from AD 327. Emphasis is placed on the application of ideological and theoretical knowledge.

AD 464 Product Design: BFA Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 303, AD 427 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Continued development of ideological and theoretical concerns. Emphasis is placed on preparing a selection of work as a professional portfolio and writing a paper supporting the activity.

Sculpture

AD 116 Sculpture

4 cr.

Introduction to methods and techniques of sculpture and its cognate support.

AD 216 Sculpture: Bronze and Aluminum Casting

4 cr.

Development of skills and concepts in the production of sculpture using bronze and aluminum casting. Concentration is on learning the operation of production casting and mold making.

AD 316 Sculpture

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 116, AD 216,  WD 140, and AD 203.

Development of skills and concepts in the production of welded steel sculpture within the context of architecture and the environment. Ideations are directed toward large scale operations and productions.

AD 416 Sculpture: Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 316 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Production of a group of artwork focusing on multi-media assemblage, found objects and combined technologies.

AD 453 Sculpture: BFA Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 303, AD 416 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Continued development of ideological concerns in the production of studio art work as contracted with the instructor.

Woodworking

AD 124 Woodworking: Joinery and Greenwood

4 cr.

Introduction to traditional hand tool joinery and greenwood process through the production of social goods and the identification of a personal mode of practice.

AD 224 Woodworking: Turning and Bending

4 cr.

Introduction to wood turning and bending through the production of social goods and the identification of a personal mode of practice.

AD 324 Woodworking: Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 124, AD 203 and AD 224.

Development of a professional portfolio and a written support paper. Emphasis is placed on understanding the various parameters of usefulness, cost and appearance that form the design problem.

AD 424 Woodworking: Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 324 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Continued development of a professional portfolio and written support paper from AD 324. Emphasis is placed on the application of ideology and theory.

AD 461 Woodworking: BFA Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 303, AD 424 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Continued development of ideological and theoretical concerns. Emphasis is placed on preparing a selection of work as a professional portfolio and writing a paper supporting the activity.

Art Education

(for elementary education majors)

AD 310 Art for the Elementary Classroom Teacher

2 cr.

Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education.

A survey of a variety of teaching strategies to implement concepts of knowledge, values and skills in the art classroom. Special emphasis is placed on art criticism, aesthetics, art history, art production, child development, drawing, painting, paper, crayons, printmaking, fibers and lesson planning.

Art Education

(for secondary certification K-12)

AD 248 Media and Media Methodology for Art Education

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AD 175, a minimum GPA of 2.70 in the department and admission to a teacher education program. Students must have either a portfolio review of previous work or have satisfactorily completed AD 203.

An introduction in which a variety of teaching strategies is explored to implement concepts of knowledge, values, and skills with different media in the art classroom. Special emphasis is placed on discipline-based art education, audiovisual productions, planning and organization of an art room and the writing of lesson plans.

AD 350 Methods and Materials in Teaching Art Education

3 cr.

May not be applied toward a non-teaching major or any minor in art and design.

Prerequisites: Admission to the methods phase of teacher education and AD 248 with a minimum grade of “B”, and a minimum GPA of 2.70 in the department. Transfer or post-baccalaureate students must have a portfolio of their work approved by the department.

An examination of how the history of art education influences art curricula today. Special emphasis is placed on a written fifteen week curriculum, discussion of creative problem solving, discipline, motivation, evaluation and a pre-student-teaching experience in the public schools. Other instructors must be informed of this commitment to avoid conflict of obligations.

Individual Art Review Courses

AD 103 Individual Art Review

1 cr.

Graded S/U.

Introduction to the profession’s requirements and the range of opportunities in the visual arts. Students begin the development of the portfolios required for their application to the upper division in the department.

AD 203 Individual Art Review

2 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: AD 103 (with a grade of "S") and instructor of selected concentration permission, AD 160 and AD 175 (or concurrent enrollment) and 200 level seminar students must also attain a "B-" (2.7) average in their selected studio concentration to enroll.

Preparation of portfolios and resumes for evaluation before full-time faculty of the Department of Art and Design.  Concurrent enrollment in a 300-level studio course is possible only with the advisor’s consent, since a passing grade in AD 203 is generally considered a requirement for enrollment in the department’s upper division. This course may be repeated, but students receiving one or more grades of Unsatisfactory or Withdrawal will not be allowed to continue in the program.

AD 303 Individual Art Review

2 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: AD 203 (with a grade of S), AD 270, and 300 level seminar (or concurrent enrollment), plus permission of the instructor of the particular studio area. Students must also attain a "B-" (2.7) average in their selected studio concentration to enroll.

Students identify the characteristics of professionalism and the ability to discuss their art work with small groups of faculty.  Students are expected to develop resumes, statements about their intent with an emphasis on the social, visual and  ideological aspects of the visual arts, color transparencies of work and a professional portfolio presentation. This course may be repeated, but students receiving one or more grades of Unsatisfactory or Withdrawal will not be allowed to continue in the program.

AD 403 Individual Art Review

2 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: AD 303 (with a grade of S) and acceptance of the AD 403 Portfolio Review Application.

Preparation of a collection of work to demonstrate the student’s professional competence for exhibit presentation in a departmentally approved gallery.

Special Courses

AD 291 Studio Workshop

1-4 cr.

Prerequisite: Freshman or sophomore standing.

A course designed to develop specific studio skills of students who are interested in enhancing the classroom studio experience.

AD 295 Special Topics in Art and Design

1-4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Prerequisite: Freshman or sophomore standing.

A course providing art and design experiences not emphasized in regular course offerings.

AD 298 Directed Study

1-4 cr.

Prerequisite: Freshman or sophomore standing and instructor permission.

A course arranged by contract with the instructor of a particular studio area.

AD 299 Associate Research

4 cr.

Prerequisite: Open to associate degree candidates only.

Individual study with an instructor of a particular studio concentration exploring and utilizing techniques, materials and processes.  It must be taken at the hours for regularly presented studio classes in the concentration.

AD 450 Studio Practice

2-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and department head permission. Open only to those students who through transfer or departmental evaluation do not have enough credits for graduation from a particular area of studio concentration.

A course arranged by contract with the instructor of a particular studio concentration.

AD 491 Studio Workshop

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior, senior or graduate standing.

A course designed to develop specific studio skills of students who are interested in enhancing the classroom studio experience.

AD 492 Internship in Art and Design

1-4 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: AD 160, AD 175, AD 203, AD 303, AD 270, GPA 2.7, junior standing and approval of the major professor.

The object of this course is to provide Art and Design majors with professional work experience in their chosen area of concentration.

AD 495 Special Topics in Art and Design

1-4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Prerequisites: Junior, senior or graduate standing and instructor permission.

A course providing art and design experiences not emphasized in regular course offerings.

AD 498 Directed Study

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior, senior or graduate standing and instructor permission.

A course arranged by contract with the instructor of a particular studio area.

AIS

(Academic Information Services)

AIS 101 Introduction to Information Resources

1 cr.

A practical introduction to the organization of information.  The course includes instruction and practice in the use of the library, basic reference materials, the online catalog, CD-ROMs, periodical indexes, and government documents.  Open to all students, it is especially recommended for first year students.

AIS 295 Special Topics

1-4 cr.

Investigation of a significant topic. Content varies.

AIS 296 Special Topics

1-4 cr.

Graded S/U.

Investigation of a significant topic.  Content varies.

AIS 330 Management of Archival Information

4 cr.

Examination of the knowledge, theory, and related skills required to manage archival information. This course will review the nature of information, records, historical documentation, research methodologies, and the role of archives in modern society. Students will learn and apply in practicum exercises the theories and skills necessary to understand and implement archival functions and research methodologies.

AIS 435 Research Using Digital Information Resources

2 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

A theoretical and practical study of digital information resources. Hands-on practice with searching digital information resources (Internet, online databases, e-journals) is an integral part of the course. Issues such as access, copyright, preservation, authorship, ownership, organization, citation formats, and content evaluation will be discussed as they apply to locating and using digital information resources.

AIS 491 Workshops and Seminars in Library and Information Science

1-4 cr.

Graded S/U.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

Opportunities for the concentrated study of selected library and information topics.

AIS 495 Special Topics in Library and Information Science

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

An opportunity to study resources and issues in library and information science that are not part of established courses.

AIS 496 Special Topics in Library and Information Science

1-4 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

Investigation of significant topic. Content varies.

AH

(Allied Health)

AH 100 Exploration of Health Careers

2 cr.

This course is designed for any student who wishes to learn more about a variety of health related careers in an organized and structured format. The student will learn about the profession, what is available on campus, meet the appropriate contact people and tour the facilities. In addition to lecture, guest speakers, video tapes and field trips, students will be given a variety of assignments designed to assess their suitability for these fields and meet the goals of the freshman seminar course.

AH 102 Growth and Development

3 cr.

Developing a concept of human life from birth to death. Emphasis is on the normal stages of growth and development of the human being, incorporating the particular nutritional requirements of each stage. This course serves as a framework within which students (1) explore their own feelings concerning the life process, and (2) develop a philosophy concerning the appreciation of that process.

AH 125 Clinical Assistant Skills

3 cr. (2-0-2)

This course introduces the clinical assistant to the basic skills that are required to carry out select patient interventions in varied health care settings. The student practices and then performs select clinical skills on patients in health care settings.

AMT

(Technology and Occupational Sciences Department)

AMT 101 Introduction to Aviation Maintenance

6 cr.

A study of fundamentals of aviation maintenance. Topics include: aircraft familiarization, nomenclature, physics of flight, flight-line safety, aviation math, physics, and basic electricity.

AMT 102 Aircraft Basic Science

6 cr.

Identification, selection, and use of FAA publications related to aircraft maintenance, determination of authority to return to service, mechanic’s privileges, and limitations, use of aircraft records, familiarization with aircraft drawings and aircraft weight and balance.

AMT 103 Aviation Shop Practices

6 cr.

A study of the use of basic hand tools and power equipment, shop safety, fluid lines and fittings, materials and processes, cleaning and corrosion control, the use and care of precision measuring tools, and the use and interpretation of various non-destructive inspection methods.

AMT 104 Aircraft Electrical Systems

6 cr.

A study of the reading and interpretation of aircraft electrical diagrams and schematics, theory of operation and repair of aircraft electrical generation and regulation systems, airframe and power plant warning and control systems.

AMT 200 Aircraft Sheet Metal/Non-Metallic Structures

6 cr.

Prerequisites: AMT 101, AMT 102, AMT 103, AMT 104 or instructor permission.

A study of aircraft sheet metal structural fabrication and repair methods, wood, fabric, composite and plastic aircraft components construction and repair.

AMT 201 Reciprocating Engines and Propellers

6 cr.

Prerequisites: AMT 101, AMT 102, AMT 103, AMT 104 or instructor permission.

An in-depth study of the theory of operation of reciprocating engines, and their systems, propeller systems, construction, operation, maintenance and repair.

AMT 202 Aircraft Flight Control Systems

6 cr.

Prerequisites:  AMT 101, AMT 102, AMT 103,  AMT 104 or instructor permission.

A detailed study of aircraft flight control system installation, rigging, and requirements for methods of aircraft inspection.  Helicopter aerodynamics, assembly, rigging, and components.

AMT 203 Reciprocating Engine Overhaul

6 cr.

Prerequisites: AMT 101, AMT 102, AMT 103, AMT 104, AMT 201 or instructor permission.

The study of overhaul practices of reciprocating aircraft engines.  Includes removal/reinstallation, inspection, overhaul, maintenance, repair, and troubleshooting of aircraft reciprocating engines and systems.

AMT 204 Turbine Engines and Systems

6 cr.

Prerequisites: AMT 101, AMT 102, AMT 103, AMT 104 or instructor permission.

The study of the theory of operation of aircraft turbine engines and their associated systems.

AMT 205 Aircraft Fluid Power and Landing Gear

6 cr.

Prerequisites: AMT 101, AMT 102, AMT 103, AMT, 104 or instructor permission.

A detailed study of aircraft hydraulic, pneumatic, and landing gear system operation, maintenance and repair.

AMT 206 Cabin Atmosphere and Information Systems

6 cr.

Prerequisites: AMT 101, AMT 102, AMT 103, AMT 104 or instructor permission.

The study of aircraft cabin atmospheric control systems including heating, cooling, cabin pressurization systems, and oxygen systems. Also aircraft instruments, ice and rain control, communication and navigation system installation, maintenance and repair.

AMT 207 Turbine Engine Maintenance and Inspection

6 cr.

Prerequisites: AMT 101, AMT 102, AMT 103, AMT 104, AMT 204 or instructor permission.

The study of overhaul and repair procedures for aircraft gas turbine engines. The course provides the hands-on practical experience necessary to inspect, overhaul, maintain, and repair turbine engines.

AN

(Sociology and Social Work Department)

AN 100 Introduction to Socio-Cultural Anthropology

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of social sciences requirement.

Satisfies the world cultures requirement.

The significance of culture and society as means of adapting to a varied and changing environment. Adaptation and cultural evolution are examined through a cross-cultural study of economic, social, political, and ideological institutions. Art, music, and language are also discussed.

AN 101 Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Archeology

4 cr.

An introduction to current evidence for human evolution. The fossil record, genetics, primate studies and archaeological evidence are interrelated to provide a complete understanding of our present status as homo sapiens.

AN 210 People, Culture and Nature

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of social sciences requirement.

Satisfies the world cultures requirement.

Study of the impact of society, culture, and environment on the way people live. The elements of socio-cultural systems of various types of tribal and modern societies are compared. Broad trends and relationships are stressed; the course utilizes knowledge from biology, social science, psychology and ecology.

AN 295 Special Topics in Anthropology

1-4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Development of anthropological topics not addressed in regular courses, depending on faculty expertise and student needs.

AN 320 Native Peoples of North America

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of social sciences requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Satisfies the world cultures requirement.

Prerequisites: AN 100 or instructor permission. If taken as upper division liberal studies course, completion of foundations of communication requirement and sophomore standing also are required.

Analysis of the cultural variability of the North American Indians and Inuit's prior to European contact, as well as the effects of this contact on the indigenous peoples. Concludes with a discussion of contemporary problems of the native peoples of North America.

AN 330 Indians of the Western Great Lakes

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AN 100 or AN 210.

An introduction to the cultures of the Native peoples of the Western Great Lakes.  The course will focus on a comparative examination of the life ways of the Indians before European contact and an assessment of the impact of European contact on these cultures.  Particular attention will be given to how the different environments of the Western Great Lakes Region influenced the particular Indian lifestyles and how people at various times adapted to these differing environments.  Special attention will be given to the Indians of Michigan.

AN 355 Seminar in Archaeological Field Methods

2-10 cr.

May be repeated if the experience differs.

No more than 10 credits may be applied toward the minor in anthropology.

Prerequisites: AN 101 or instructor permission.

Introduction to archaeological field methods through participation in actual site survey and excavation. Instruction is given in excavation procedures, survey techniques, recording, photography, preservation, cataloguing, and preliminary analysis.

AN 382 Health, Society, and Culture

4 cr.

Prerequisites: SO 101 or AN 100 or instructor permission.

Cross-listed as SO 382.

Analysis of behavioral science dimensions of health systems and health institutions at a national level, with special emphasis on the United States. The behavioral science approach to problems of health and disease is discussed, along with social and cultural factors relating to the occurrence and distribution of disease. American medical systems and institutions are analyzed in terms of political and economic factors, types of practitioners, the distribution of health services and personnel, and in comparison with medical systems in other societies.

AN 495 Special Topics in Anthropology

4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Prerequisites: AN 100 or AN 210 for cultural anthropology topic; AN 101 for physical anthropology and archaeology topic; junior standing or instructor permission.

Topic to be announced.

AN 498 Directed Study in Anthropology

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Two anthropology courses, junior standing and instructor permission.

A course for students desiring work in areas not covered in existing courses.

AS

(Physics Department)

AS 103 Observational and Solar System Astronomy

4 cr. (3-0-3)

This course may not be taken for credit towards the physics major or minor.

Satisfies the foundations of natural sciences/mathematics requirement.

Prerequisites: High school algebra or MA 100.

History of astronomy; observational astronomy; basic science principles and how they relate to astronomy; the celestial sphere and coordinate systems; star charts; telescopes; formation and evolution of the solar system; planetary characteristics (internal structure, surfaces, atmospheres); comets and asteroids.

AS 104 Stellar/Galactic Astronomy and Cosmology

4 cr. (3-0-3)

This course may not be taken for credit towards the physics major or minor.

Satisfies the foundations of natural sciences/mathematics requirement.

Prerequisites: High school algebra or MA 100.

The nature and life cycle of stars including nova and supernova, black holes, white dwarfs and neutron stars; characteristics of the sun; basic scientific principles and how they relate to stellar characteristics; formation and evolution of galaxies; stellar and galactic distance determination methods; spectroscopy; models of formation, evolution, and expansion of the universe (cosmology).

AS 495 Special Topics

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

A course devoted to a particular topic in astronomy that is not included in the regular courses, or to meet the special needs of a group of students.  It may be repeated if the topic is different.

ATR

(Health, Physical Education & Recreation Department)

ATR 100 Introduction to Athletic Training

1 cr.

An introduction to the field of athletic training including: professional organizations, certification information, job employment settings and basic prevention and care techniques. NATABOC's domains of athletic training will be used to provide the student with an understanding of the profession.

ATR 241 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injury

2 cr.

Prerequisite: BI 201.

An introduction to basic injury recognition, prevention, and evaluation procedures. Focus will be on but not limited to internal athletic injuries, head and neck injuries, heat related illnesses and basic emergency procedures. Along with "hands on" experience, students will obtain an understanding of basic anatomy, injury evaluation, recognition, and treatment of many athletic injuries.

ATR 292A: Introduction to Practicum I

1 cr.

Prerequisites: Admission into the Athletic Training Program, ATR 100, ATR 241.

This clinical lab and clinical athletic training experience will focus on the development of, and competence in lower extremity palpation, taping and wrapping techniques, and emergency procedures. Student will be required to successfully complete all course competencies before moving on to the next practicum.

ATR 292B: Introduction to Practicum II

1 cr.

Prerequisite:  ATR 292A

This clinical and clinical athletic training experience will focus on the development of, and competence in upper extremity palpation, taping and wrapping techniques, custom padding, and non-theoretical modality usage. Students will be required to successfully complete all course competencies before moving on to the next practicum.

ATR 320 Advanced Assessment Techniques in Athletics Training I

3 cr.

Prerequisites: ATR 100, ATR 241, BI 201.

This course is designed to explore in depth, the modern techniques used in the evaluation of athletic injuries to the lower region of the body, including the foot, ankle, knee, hip and lower spinal region. Particular emphasis will be placed on taking a medical history, performing a medical observation, physical palpation, functional testing and special testing. This course will also include an emphasis on injury pathology, and a unit on general medical conditions common to athletics.

ATR 321 Advanced Assessment Techniques in Athletics Training II

3 cr.

Prerequisite: ATR 320.

This course is designed to explore in depth, the modern techniques used in the evaluation of athletic injuries to the upper region of the body, including the hand, wrist, elbow, shoulder, neck, head, and trunk.  Particular emphasis will be placed on taking a medical history, performing a medical observation, physical palpation, functional testing and special testing.  The student will be made aware of the key signs and symptoms that indicate specific athletic-related injuries and conditions. This course will also focus on injury pathology. A unit on pharmacology will also be included.

ATR 360 Therapeutic Exercise and Rehabilitation Techniques

2 cr.

Prerequisites: ATR 241, ATR 292A, 292B.

The student will be exposed to a wide variety of rehabilitation techniques, including aquatic therapy, plyometrics, stretching, etc. The student will learn basic guidelines of injury rehabilitation including goals, progression, functional testing, return to play, and referral, etc. Certain specific rehabilitation protocols will also be discussed.

ATR 380 Therapeutic Modalities

2 cr.

Prerequisites: ATR 241, ATR 292A, ATR 292B.

This clinical athletic training experience will involve student participation at one of the ATR programs established on-campus or affiliated athletic training sites. Student will work under the direct supervision of an ATC and will be expected to utilize skills, in which they have demonstrated competence. Students will also be expected to develop and become competent in lower extremity manual muscle testing techniques, goniometric assessments, and complete evaluation methods.

ATR 392A/B Intermediate Practicum

2 cr.

Prerequisites: ATR 292A/B, Admission to the Athletic Training Program.

Continuation of ATR 392A with emphasis on upper extremity.

ATR 410 Athletic Training Policies and Procedures

2 cr.

Prerequisites: ATR 100, ATR 241, Practicum, Admission to the Athletic Training Program, junior standing or permission of instructor.

This course is designed to expose the student to the many management and administrative duties athletic trainers are responsible for. Included, but not limited to, are managing a budget, staffing, developing and implementing policies, and communication with athletes, coaches, parents, etc. Record keeping and organization will also be stressed.

ATR 490 Seminar in Athletic Training

2 cr.

Prerequisites:  ATR 100, ATR 241, ATR 320, Practicum, junior standing or permission of instructor.

The student will be exposed to current topics of interest and issues in athletic training. Continuing education will be stressed. Developing discussion skills in athletic training will also be reinforced. In addition, a unit on counseling and a unit on research will be included in this course.

ATR 492A/B Advanced Practicum in Athletic Training

2 cr.

Admission to the Athletic Training program is REQUIRED for enrollment in any of the "practicums".

Prerequisites: ATR 292, ATR 392, Admission to Athletic Training Program, junior standing or permission of instructor.

This clinical athletic training course is designed to allow students, under direct supervision, to utilize all skills in which they have achieved competence. Particular emphasis in the areas of record keeping, development of the relationship of the sports medicine team, and decision making skills.

BC

(Communication and Performance Studies Department)

BC 165 Introduction to Mass Media

4 cr.

Examination of contemporary mass media in the United States, including the press, movies, radio, television and new mass communication technologies. These will be studied from several perspectives – historical, economic, social and political.

BC 245 Radio-TV Performance

4 cr.

Introduction to the basic verbal and visual elements for students interested in performance for radio or television. Audio elements include diction, enunciation, pronunciation, and microphone techniques. Visual elements include posture, movement, and expression. Students will perform announcements, news, commercials, interviews, and drama.

BC 265 Writing and Announcing for Broadcast

4 cr.

Introduction to the basic planning, writing and performance elements in electronic media production. Students write scripts for a variety of program formats, including commercials, public service announcements, news, interviews and documentaries. Performance elements include diction, enunciation, pronunciation, script interpretation, microphone techniques, posture, movement, and expression.

BC 271 Audio Production

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Introduction to skills used in audio recording and program production. Covers the theoretical background of the field and extensive applied laboratory experiences.

BC 272 Studio Television Production

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Introduction to the theory and practice of producing contemporary studio television programs. Includes program aesthetics, production planning, visual design, scripting, rehearsing and directing.

BC 273 Electronic Field Production

4 cr.

Basic theories and techniques of single camera electronic field production. Includes program aesthetics, production planning, scripting, shooting, sound recording, video tape editing, and post-production processes. Students produce several projects.

BC 291 Broadcast Practicum

1-4 cr.

May be repeated for up to 4 credits in combination with BC 491.

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

Practice in operational positions in broadcasting under the supervision of media professionals and a faculty member.

BC 295 Special Topics in Broadcasting

1-4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Intended for underclassmen. Investigation of a significant topic or theme.

BC 320 Electronic Media Management

4 cr.

Contemporary problems faced by managers of radio, television, and cable TV stations are studied. Solutions to those problems and the decision-making process are analyzed.

BC 325 Communication and Performance in Africa

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of visual and performing arts requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Satisfies the world cultures requirement.

Prerequisites: Completion of the foundations of communications requirement and sophomore standing or permission of instructor.

Examination of a range of different performance genres in Africa, and shows the relationship of performance genres to social process.  The course reviews pre-colonial performance genres including African storytelling; African oratory and praise poetry; African rites and rituals--all of which incorporate music and dance traditions. The course also examines modern and post-modern African performance genres including popular theatre, radio and television broadcasts, music, cinema, and indigenous video production.

BC 365 Broadcast News Writing and Reporting

4 cr.

Prerequisite: BC 265.

An opportunity to study the craft of writing and field reporting for television news. Instruction on writing, story structure, source development, news judgment, ethics, and law is put into practice as students shoot, edit, and write six local news reports that will be aired on Public Eye News, the student newscast on Public TV 13. Students in BC 365 will also serve as associate producers one day each week for Public Eye News.

BC 410 The Documentary

4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Examination of the documentary genre with emphasis on its application and form in radio and television. Topics considered are the historical development of the documentary form, definitions of “documentary,” the current role and future potential of the documentary.

BC 415 Intercultural Communication

4 cr.

Satisfies the world cultures requirement.

Does not satisfy the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Prerequisites: BC 165 and SP 110, junior standing or instructor permission.

This course examines cultural differences in communication styles and systems across a variety of national and American sub cultural groups. Communication studied include both interpersonal and mass mediated message systems.

BC 420 Global Communication

4 cr.

Prerequisites: BC 165, junior standing or instructor permission.

The term “globalization” as applied to mass media refers to the convergence of the world’s formerly diversely organized media systems into profit-making enterprises, mostly owned or controlled by giant multinational firms. This course will introduce students to the phenomenon of media globalization through a review of its economic and policy foundations. It will then examine some of the effects of media globalization on information flow and on the framing of world issues.

BC 470 Mass Communication Law

4 cr.

Prerequisites: BC 165, junior standing or instructor permission.

Analysis of the legal parameters within which the print and electronic media must operate including First Amendment freedoms, libel, copyright, and Federal Communication Commission rules and regulations.

BC 471 Mass Communication and Society

4 cr.

Prerequisites: BC 165 and senior or graduate standing or instructor permission.

Study of the social, legal, and economic basis of radio, television, newspapers, and film in the United States, with emphasis on the roles played by the media, the government, and the public in the process of mass communication.

BC 473 Advanced Media Production

4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Prerequisites: Corresponding 200 level production course, junior standing or instructor permission.

Study of advanced production theory, method, and technique. Students put theory into practice through extensive laboratory work.

BC 473A Advanced Media Production-Audio

 

BC 473F Advanced Media Production-Field Television Production

 

BC 473M Advanced Media Production—Multi-Media

 

BC 473S Advanced Media Production—Studio Television Production

(3-0-2)

 

BC 473W Advanced Media Production—Script Writing

(1-0-2)

 

BC 485 Radio and Television Utilization

2 cr. (1-0-2)

May be repeated for credit.

Introduction to the process of producing radio and television programs. Includes production planning and operation of studio laboratory equipment. Specifically designed for those who desire a knowledge of these two media for application in other fields. Laboratory production directing experience under faculty supervision.

BC 490 Senior Seminar in Broadcasting

4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

A course for broadcasting and mass communication majors designed to stimulate students to unify all areas of their disciplines.

BC 491 Broadcast Practicum

1-4 cr.

May be repeated for up to four credits in combination with BC 291.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and instructor permission.

Practice in creative production and directing aspects of broadcasting under the supervision of media professionals and a faculty member.

BC 492 Internship in Broadcasting

1-8 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and recommendation of selection committee. Available only to outstanding students as an elective.

Practical, applied experience involving placement in a broadcast or mass media job situation.

BC 495 Special Topics in Broadcasting

1-4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Special problems in broadcasting and mass communication such as mass communication research, station relations and promotion, satellite and CATV systems, international communication, media advertising, and telecom policy.

BC 498 Directed Studies in Broadcasting

1-4 cr.

May be repeated for up to eight credits.

Prerequisites: Junior standing, instructor and department head permission.

Independent study by undergraduates in an area of broadcasting and/or mass communication to be specified by the student and the instructor.

BI

(Biology Department)

BI 100 Biological Science

4 cr. (3-0-2)

May not be applied toward a major or minor in biology.

Satisfies the foundations of natural sciences/mathematics requirement.

Study of fundamental concepts of biology that relate to problems confronting individuals and society. Topics include methods and limitations of science; human dependence on other organisms; problems related to food production, human reproduction, inheritance, and disease; biological implications of modern technology, and biological problems likely to confront society in the future.

BI 104 Human Anatomy and Physiology

4 cr. (3-0-2)

May not be applied toward any biology major or the biology education minor.

Satisfies the foundations of natural sciences/mathematics requirement.

Structure and function of the various systems of the human body. Laboratory includes models and specimens of human material and the collection and analysis of physiological data.

BI 111 Introductory Biology: Principles

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Satisfies the foundations of natural sciences/mathematics requirement.

An introduction to the major principles of biology. Topics include chemistry of life, structure and function of cells, photosynthesis and respiration, mitosis and meiosis, heredity, molecular biology, evolution, and ecology.

BI 112 Introductory Biology:  Diversity

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Prerequisite: BI 111

Satisfies the foundations of natural sciences/mathematics requirement.

A survey of biological diversity including viruses, prokaryotes, protists, fungi, plants, and animals.  Attention is also given to the structure and function of plant and animal organ systems.

BI 201 Human Anatomy

3 cr. (2-0-2)

Study of human anatomy, supplemented by laboratory work on models.

BI 202 Human Physiology

5 cr. (3-1-2)

Prerequisites: CH 105, CH 107 or CH 111. Recommended: a course dealing with anatomy. Highly recommended: completion of BI 201 or BI 221.

Studies of all systems of human physiology, supplemented by laboratory work which demonstrates basic physiological phenomena. Previous knowledge of anatomy and chemistry is required.

BI 203 Medical Microbiology

5 cr. (3-0-4)

Prerequisites: BI 100 or BI 104 or BI 112 or BI 202.

Introduction to medically important microorganisms; the role of microbes in human health, infection, and immunity. Laboratory focuses on the experimental approach to microbiology.

BI 206 Human Genetics

3 cr.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or instructor permission.

A nontechnical course designed to introduce fundamentals of variation and inheritance in humans. May not be applied toward any biology major or the biology secondary teaching minor.

BI 210 Principles of Ecology

4 cr. (3-0-3)

Prerequisite: One year of introductory biology.

Lectures, field and laboratory studies dealing with the relationships between plants, animals, humans and the ecosphere.

BI 218 Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology

4 cr. (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: BI 111, CH 105, CH 107 or CH 111, CH 112.

Introduction to the structure and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, including membrane structure and transport, organelle structure and function, cytoskeletal proteins, cell division, gene structure, mechanisms of gene regulation, and the role of gene expression in producing cell structures and in regulating cell function. Students will gain an understanding of recombinant DNA technology and how it is used to investigate the function of cells and genes. Laboratory work will include DNA isolation, restriction digestion and electrophoresis, PCR, Southern Blotting, bacterial transformation, microscopy, differential centrifugation, and spectrophotometry.

BI 221 Comparative Anatomy

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Prerequisites: BI 111 and BI 112.

Structural characteristics of representative chordates. Lectures deal with the evolution of body form, skeleton, and organ systems, as indicated by anatomical relationships. Laboratory work is devoted largely to dissection.

BI 222 Animal Physiology

4 cr. (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: BI 111, BI 112 and CH 220 or CH 321.

Physiological functions and processes at the level of organs and organ systems, oriented primarily towards vertebrates. Energy relations, temperature effects, movement, circulation, respiration, water and solute regulation, membranes, nerve and muscle physiology.

BI 222 Physiology of Aging

3 cr. (3-0-0)

Prerequisites: BI 104 or BI 111 or BI 202 or instructor permission.

This course is designed to introduce students to physiological changes associated with aging or age-related pathology. The roles of heredity, diet, exercise and lifestyle in the aging process as well as current theories of aging will be discussed.

BI 225 Physiology of Aging

3 cr. (3-0-0)

Prerequisites: BI 104 or BI 111 or BI 202 or permission of instructor.

This course is designed to introduce students to physiological changes associated with aging or age-related pathology.  The roles of heredity, diet, exercise and lifestyle in the aging process as well as current theories of aging will be discussed.

BI 230 Plant Kingdom

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Prerequisites: BI 111 and BI 112.

A treatment of form, life cycles, and evolutionary relationships of algae, fungi, bryophytes, and vascular plants. Laboratory work uses both living and preserved material.

BI 231 Plant Taxonomy

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Prerequisites: BI 230 or instructor permission.

Native local flora, especially ferns and flowering plants. Training in the collection, identification, and preservation of plants and in the preparation and care of herbaria. Principles and systems of classification.

BI 240 Conservation Biology

4 cr.

Prerequisite: BI 210

Introduction to the basic scientific principles and concepts concerning the field of Conservation Biology. Topics include causes of extinction, genetic risks of small populations, habitat fragmentation and edge effects, metapopulations, threats of exotic species, nature preserve and corridor design, and strategies for protecting and restoring endangered species and ecosystems.

BI 295 Special Topics in Biology

1-4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

Variable content, depending on specialties of visiting staff and needs of students. For freshmen, sophomores, and non-biology majors.

BI 303 General Microbiology

5 cr. (3-0-4)

Prerequisites: BI 111 and BI 112 or CLS 204 and CLS 214 and CH 220 or CH 321; BI 312 recommended.

Study of morphology, physiology, genetics, and taxonomy of microbes and related laboratory techniques.

BI 305 Ecology of the Northern Forest

3 cr. (2-0-3)

May not be applied toward any major in biology.

Satisfies the foundations of natural sciences/mathematics requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Prerequisites: BI 111 or junior standing recommended.

Study of the interactions of physical features, vegetation, animal life, and human influences in the northern forests of North America, Europe, and Asia, through lectures, laboratories, and field trips. 

BI 310 Ecology Theory and Methods

4 cr. (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: BI 210 or instructor permission.

Lectures, field and laboratory studies on advanced concepts relating plants and animals to their environment. This course expands on principles taught in BI 210.

BI 312 Genetics

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Prerequisites: BI 111, BI 112 or BI 202.

Basic Mendelian laws; the nature of genes, and population genetics, with emphasis on genetics as a rapidly unfolding science. Genetics is related to theories concerning organic evolution.

BI 313 Cell Biology

4 cr. (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: BI 111 and BI 112, or BI 201 or BI 221 and CH 220 or CH 321 or permission of instructor.

Structure and biochemistry of eukaryotic cells and organelles, with selected features of prokaryotic cells. Topics include methods of study, chemical components, compartmentalization of cells, nuclear control, and metabolism. Laboratory work includes cytochemistry, spectrophotometry, electrophoresis, and differential centrifugation.

BI 315 Evolution

4 cr.

Prerequisites: BI 312 or permission of instructor.

Evolution is the process by which heritable characteristics of species change. This course will emphasize evolutionary theory rather than evolutionary history. Topics will include evolutionary genetics, adaptation and natural selection, speciation, and evolution of higher taxa.

BI 321 Embryology

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Prerequisites: BI 221 or BI 201.

Reproduction and development in animals, with particular emphasis on vertebrates. Laboratory work is based largely on the frog and chick.

BI 390 Field Experience

1-2 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: Permission of supervising faculty member and department head. Can be repeated for up to six credits if topic varies.

(A course subtitle on the student’s transcript will describe the content of this course, e.g., BI 390 Field Experience in Woodcock Ecology.) Practical experience in field biology under supervision of a faculty member engaged in research. A written report of the field experience will be required and placed on file in the department office.

BI 391 Laboratory Experience

1-2 cr.

Graded S/U.

May be repeated for up to six credits if topic differs.

Prerequisites: Permission of supervising faculty member and department head.

(A course subtitle on the student’s transcript will describe the content of this course, e.g., BI 391 Laboratory Experience in Genetics.) Practical experience in laboratory biology under supervision of a faculty member engaged in research. A written report of the laboratory experience will be required and placed on file in the department office.

BI 402 Microbial Ecology

3 cr. (2-0-2)

Prerequisites: BI 111, BI 112, CH 112, junior standing or permission of instructor.

A survey of aspects of microbes, especially bacteria that influence or are influenced by the environment. The ubiquitous organisms are studied in varied habitats.

BI 404 Virology

3 cr. 

Prerequisites: BI 203 or BI 303, or CLS 204 and CLS 214, and CH 220 or CH 322, junior standing or instructor permission.

An introductory course in virology integrating some of the biochemical, genetic and medical implications of viruses with general virology.

BI 405 Immunology

3 cr.

Prerequisites: BI 203 or BI 303, or CLS 203, and CH 220 or CH 322, junior standing or instructor permission.

Introduction to immunology, considering basic immunological mechanisms including humoral and cell-mediated immunity, immunity of infectious disease, immunogenetics and tumor immunology.

BI 411 Limnology

4 cr. (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: BI 210 and CH 112, junior standing or instructor permission.

Physical, chemical, and biological aspects of lakes and streams. Laboratory work includes methods and instruments of field studies.

BI 412 Biometrics

4 cr. (3-2-0)

Prerequisites: MA 105 or equivalent, junior standing or permission of instructor.

Design and classification of experiments, methods of estimation and testing of hypotheses related to experiments. Desk calculators are used to solve simple problems involving data available from the student’s field of study.

BI 413 Biochemistry of Development

4 cr. (2-2-0)

Prerequisites: BI 312, and either BI 313, BI 321, or CH 450, junior standing or permission of instructor.

The biochemical and genetic events accompanying and influencing embryonic development, with emphasis on pertinent literature and techniques.

BI 414 Electron Microscopy

3 cr. (1-0-5)

Prerequisites: Senior or graduate standing and instructor permission.

Lecture and laboratory work on the routine procedures of electron microscopy including specimen preparation, viewing, micrograph processing, interpretation analysis, and application to biological problems. Cytochemical and high resolution autoradiographic techniques may also be explored.

BI 416 Experimental Cytogenetics

2-3 cr.

Prerequisites: BI 206 or BI 312, junior standing or instructor permission.

A course designed to develop competence in the preparation, recognition, and presentation of karyotypes with emphasis on the human karyotype. Three credits may be earned by students who prepare a term paper. Students may enroll for three credits only with instructor permission.

BI 418 Molecular Biology

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Prerequisites: BI 312 (or BI 206 with instructor permission), and CH 220 or CH 322, and credit or enrollment in CH 450, junior standing or instructor permission.

Prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene structure and expression. Laboratories explore some of the techniques used for manipulating genes in vitro, including DNA isolation, DNA electrophoresis, subcloning, and work with the bacteriophage. This course will cover some of the theory and applications of biotechnology.

BI 421 Invertebrate Zoology

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Prerequisites: BI 111, BI 112, junior standing or permission of instructor.

Identity and habits of invertebrates, excluding parasites and insects, with emphasis on observation, collection, and recognition of local fauna.

BI 422 Vertebrate Zoology

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Prerequisites: BI 111, BI 112, junior standing or permission of instructor.

Selected studies of major vertebrate groups with emphasis on higher classification, systematic relationships, and evolution. Laboratory exercises include dissection, anatomical observations and identification of representative vertebrates.

BI 423 Parasitology

3 cr. (2-0-3)

Prerequisites: BI 111 and BI 112  or CLS 204 and CLS 214, junior standing or permission of instructor.

Life histories, ecology, physiology and host-parasite relationships. Laboratory includes examination of hosts for parasites and preparation of specimens for study.

BI 424 General Entomology

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Prerequisites: BI 111, BI 112, junior standing or permission of instructor.

Structure, physiology, taxonomy, ecology, and economic importance of insects and their near relatives. Techniques of collecting, preserving, and mounting specimens for study.

BI 425 Endocrinology

3 cr. (3-0-0)

Prerequisites: BI 202 or BI 222, and CH 220 or equivalent, junior standing or instructor permission.

Structure and physiology of endocrine glands, biological actions and biochemistry of hormones, emphasizing their role (at the systems level) in homeostasis, intermediary metabolism, reproduction and behavior of mammals.

BI 426 Human Histology

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Prerequisites: BI 111 and BI 112, or CLS 201, and BI 201 or BI 221, junior standing or instructor permission.

Study of the microscopic anatomy of human tissues and organs at the light microscope level.

BI 427 Ecological Animal Physiology

4 cr.

Prerequisites: BI 210, and BI 222 or BI 202, junior standing or instructor permission.

The course emphasizes physiological adaptations of animals to their environment. It covers topics such as thermoregulation, nutrition and digestion, osmoregulation, nitrogen metabolism, sensory physiology, and reproductive physiology.

BI 430 Plant Anatomy

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Prerequisites: BI 230 junior standing or instructor permission.

Structure and development of higher forms of plant life. Techniques of selecting and staining plant tissues are practiced.

BI 431 Plant Physiology

4 cr. (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: BI 111, BI 112, CH 112, junior standing or permission of instructor.

Principles of plant nutrition, metabolism, plant water relations, transport of materials in plants and physiological aspects of plant growth and development. Methods of studying plant functions are emphasized in the laboratory.

BI 433 Local Flora

2 cr. (1-0-3)

Prerequisites: BI 111, BI 112, junior standing or permission of instructor.

Lecture, field and laboratory studies dealing with recognition, collection, and preservation of herbaceous plants.

BI 434 Plant Ecology

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Prerequisites: BI 210, BI 310 recommended, junior standing or permission of instructor.

Field oriented study of terrestrial and aquatic vegetation, covering topics in population, community, and landscape ecology. Laboratories emphasize research approaches, sampling techniques, data analysis, and technical writing skills.

BI 441 Fisheries Management

3 cr. (2-0-2)

Prerequisites: BI 210 or BI 422, and MA 104 or MA 105 or MA 171, junior standing or permission of instructor.

Philosophy and objectives of managing the North American fisheries; implementation of management techniques. Laboratory instruction includes collection and analysis of data.

BI 442 Wildlife Management

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Prerequisites: BI 210, junior standing or permission of instructor.

Application of ecological principles and technical knowledge to the management of populations of wildlife.

BI 460 Ichthyology

3 cr. (2-0-3)

Prerequisites: BI 111, BI 112, junior standing or permission of instructor.

Identification, ecology, and behavior of local fishes.

BI 461 Herpetology

3 cr. (2-0-3)

Prerequisites: BI 111, BI 112, junior standing or permission of instructor.

Field oriented study of amphibians and reptiles emphasizing identification and habits of local fauna.

BI 462 Ornithology

3 cr. (2-0-3) 

Prerequisites: BI 111, BI 112, junior standing or permission of instructor.

Lectures, laboratories and field trips dealing with evolution systematics, morphology, ecology, behavior and identification of birds with emphasis on local species.

BI 463 Mammalogy

3 cr. (2-0-3) 

Prerequisites: BI 111, BI 112, junior standing or permission of instructor.

Lectures, laboratories and field trips dealing with evolution systematics, morphology, ecology, behavior and identification of mammals with emphasis on the Great Lakes region.

BI 465 Aquatic Insects

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Prerequisites: BI 111, BI 112, junior standing or permission of instructor.

Emphasis on the recognition of major taxa of aquatic insects, especially from the local area, through the use of technical reference materials.

BI 491 Seminar

1 cr.

Prerequisites: Instructor permission and junior standing. Course prerequisites and a minimum GPA may be required for some topics. May be repeated once if topic varies.

Variable content, depending on instructor. Students read extensively from periodical literature and meet weekly for reports and discussion.

BI 492 Research in Water Science

2 cr. (0-0-4)

Prerequisites: Water science majors with junior standing or instructor permission.

A course to introduce students to environmentally related research. Projects are pursued in cooperation with a faculty research advisor. The research advisor and research problem must be selected a semester prior to registration. A written and oral final report is required.

BI 495 Special Topics in Biology

1-4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Prerequisites: Instructor permission and junior standing.

Variable content, depending upon the competencies of staff and special needs of students.

BI 498 Directed Studies in Biology

1-4 cr.

May be repeated for up to four credits.

Prerequisites: The core courses in biology, junior standing and instructor permission at least one month before beginning of course.

An opportunity for qualified junior and senior students to conduct independent study and investigative work.

BI 499 Internship

1-6 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: Senior status in good standing with a minimum GPA of 2.50 and a major in biology, botany, or zoology; appropriate background for subject of internship; advisor, department head, and cooperating agency supervisor permission.

Practical experience under the supervision of an experienced biologist, in an academic, governmental, or private setting. Application for internship must be made at the Biology Department office at least four weeks before the start of the internship. A written report incorporating an evaluation and critique of the internship experience will be required. A course subtitle on the student’s transcript will describe the particular content of this course.

CD

(Communication Disorders Department)

CD 150 Survey of Communication Disorders

4 cr.

A survey of the normal communication process and an introduction to a variety of communication disorders that affect a person’s ability to communicate effectively in our society. Etiologies and treatments of the various disorders are also discussed.

CD 160 Anatomy of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Prerequisites: CD 150 or instructor permission.

Study of the anatomical structures and the physiological function of the head, neck, and thorax and their relationship to speech and voice production, laboratory exercises and activities.

CD 200 Phonetics

3 cr.

Study of the acoustic and physiological phonetic information necessary for making phonetic transcriptions of normal and disordered speech. Instruction in phonology and articulation of sounds of general American speech are also presented in lecture and through laboratory experience.

CD 210 Introduction to Voice and Articulation

3 cr.

An introduction to normal parameters of voice and articulation processes, their disorders, assessment, and remediation.

CD 220: Speech and Voice Science

3 cr.

The study of speech production systems in terms of their anatomy, physiology, and acoustic parameters of voice, articulation, and resonance, as well as acoustic correlates relative to speech perception.

CD 252 American Sign Language I

4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Simple expressive and receptive vocabulary building and basic conversational skill in the ASL. Introduces basic information about the deaf community and its culture.

CD 253 American Sign Language II

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CD 452 with a grade of “C” or higher, junior standing or permission of instructor.

More emphasis on the development of receptive and expressive skills involving structured communication situations that require the use of ASL.

CD 351 Audiology I

3 cr.

Prerequisites: CD 160 or instructor permission.

The basic physics of sound, anatomy of the ear, pure tone testing, and pathologies of the ear.

CD 355 Language Development

3 cr.

Prerequisites: CD 200 or instructor permission.

Theories and conceptual models of language development in the young normal child. The roles of syntax, semantics, and phonology are discussed in relationship to various conceptual models and theories.

CD 356 Language Disorders

3 cr.

Prerequisites: CD 355 or instructor permission.

The theoretical foundations for the management of language disorders in children with a focus on the practical aspects of assessment and treatment.

CD 357 Fluency Disorders

3 cr. 

Study of normal dysfluency, stuttering, and cluttering. The development, measurement, and treatment of stuttering are emphasized.

CD 359 Organic Disorders of Communication

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CD 160 or instructor permission.

Organic disorders of communication with emphasis on aphasia, cleft palate, and cerebral palsy.

CD 370 Observation

2 cr.

Supervised observation of therapy and diagnostic sessions within the department's Speech and Hearing Clinic. Students are required to complete 25 hours of observation.

CD 400 Phonological Disorders

3 cr.

Prerequisites: CD 200 and CD 210, junior standing or instructor permission.

The nature, etiology, assessment, and remediation of phonological disorders in children.

CD 454 American Sign Language III

2 cr.

Prerequisites: CD 453 with a grade of “C” or higher, junior standing or permission of instructor.

Combination of basic and advanced knowledge of CD 452 and CD 453 and expansion of grammar and vocabulary development of ASL. Emphasis is placed on using the language in short stories, narratives, and conversations using learned expressive and receptive skills.

CD 456 Language and Learning Disabilities in Children

4 cr.

Prerequisites: Senior standing or instructor permission.

A review of the literature regarding language and learning disabilities in children. Biological and linguistic aspects of these disturbances are stressed.

CD 459 Neuroscience for Communication Disorders

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Prerequisite: CD 160 and CD 359, junior standing or instructor permission.

The structure and organization of the human central and peripheral nervous systems with particular emphasis on their functional relationship to normal speech and language processes, laboratory exercises and activities.

CD 460 Aging and Cognition

3 cr.

Prerequisite: CD 150, CD 355, junior standing or instructor permission.

Examination of basic cognitive processes such as attention, perception, and memory within the context of adulthood and aging. Pathological conditions which affect cognition such as traumatic brain injury and dementia will also be discussed.

CD 464 Methods of Diagnosis

4 cr.

Prerequisite: CD 200, junior standing or instructor permission.

Instruction and practice in the clinical procedures relative to the evaluation, measurement, and treatment of communication disorders in children and adults.

CD 465: Methods of Treatment

2 cr.

Prerequisites: Communication Disorders majors, and at least senior standing or instructor permission.

Instruction and practice in the clinical procedures relative to the treatment of communication disorders.

CD 492 Workshop in Speech Pathology and Audiology

1-6 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Short, intensive workshop regarding new developments in speech pathology and audiology; presented periodically.

CD 495 Special Topics in Speech Pathology and Audiology

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Topics of special interest are presented periodically as the opportunity arises.

CD 496 Special Topics in Speech Pathology and Audiology

1-4 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Topics of special interest are presented periodically as the opportunity arises.

CD 497 Directed Pre-professional Experience

3 cr.

Prerequisites: Senior status, minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 and instructor permission.

An optional clinical experience designed for exceptional students desiring to begin their clinical practice prior to entering graduate school. Students apply to the Clinic Director for consideration.

CD 498 Directed Study in Speech Pathology and/or Audiology

2-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

An intensive study of some special problem under the guidance of a faculty member in the speech pathology or audiology area.

CH

(Chemistry Department)

CH 090 Basic Chemistry

3 cr.

Prerequisites: Proficiency in algebra (one year of high school algebra is recommended).

Does not count toward a major or minor in chemistry.

This course can not be applied to any associate or baccalaureate degrees.

General survey of the principles of chemistry for students having no previous chemistry or inadequate background for CH 111 or CH 107. This is an integrated lecture-laboratory course utilizing an experimental approach.

CH 105 Chemical Principles

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Satisfies the foundations of natural sciences/mathematics requirement.

Prerequisites: Proficiency in algebra (one year of high school algebra is recommended).

Introduction to chemistry  including contemporary applications and problems. Topics include states of matter, atomic and molecular structure, electrochemistry, energy, nuclear chemistry, organic and polymer chemistry. The fundamentals of these topics is discussed as well as their relationship to technology and consumer uses. Does not count toward a major or minor in chemistry.

CH 107 Introductory Chemistry I

4 cr. (3-1-2)

Does not count toward a major or minor in chemistry. Primarily for students preparing for a career in nursing or a related profession.

Satisfies the foundations of natural sciences/mathematics requirement.

Prerequisites: Proficiency in algebra (one year of high school algebra or MA 100 is recommended) and one year of high school chemistry or CH 090 is recommended.

Fundamental laws and generalizations of inorganic chemistry and introduction to nomenclature, structure, functional groups, and reactions of organic chemistry.

CH 108 Introductory Chemistry II

4 cr. (3-1-2)

Does not count toward major or minor in chemistry.

Satisfies the foundations of natural sciences/mathematics requirement.

Prerequisites: CH 107 or equivalent.

Continuation of CH 107. An introduction to biochemistry, with emphasis on structure of biochemical compounds and their functions in living systems.

CH 111 General Chemistry I

5 cr. (3-1-3)

Satisfies the foundations of natural sciences/mathematics requirement.

Prerequisites: Proficiency in algebra (two years of high school algebra or MA 104 or MA 105 is recommended) and one year of high school chemistry or CH 090.

Survey of atomic structure, bonding, stoichiometry, and the states of matter.

CH 112 General Chemistry II

5 cr. (3-1-3)

Satisfies the foundations of natural sciences/mathematics requirement.

Prerequisite: CH 111.

Study of chemical equilibria and kinetics, thermodynamics, solution reactions, survey of the chemistry of the common elements and nuclear chemistry.

CH 215 Chemistry of the Elements

4 cr. (3-0-3)

Prerequisite: CH 112.

Descriptive chemistry of elements and their compounds with relation to the periodic table. Emphasis is placed on chemical behavior, bonding and structure, and spectral, thermodynamic, and electrochemical properties. Laboratory work consists of the synthesis and characterization of common elements and their compounds, including simple salts, complexes, covalent and volatile compounds, and salts of oxyacids.

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry

5 cr. (4-0-3)

Credit cannot be earned in both CH 220 and CH 321.

Prerequisite: CH 112.

A one-semester comprehensive course covering all aspects of organic chemistry including nomenclature, structure, optical activity, functional groups, spectra, syntheses, and polycyclic, polyfunctional, heterocyclic, organosulfur, and organophosphorus compounds. Emphasis on the organic compounds and reactions important to the function of living systems.

CH 241 Chemical Equilibrium

3 cr.

Prerequisite: CH 112.

Study of chemical equilibrium in water including ionization, solubility, acid-base phenomena, complex ion formation, and oxidation-reduction reactions.

CH 242 Quantitative Analysis

2 cr. (0-0-6)

Prerequisite: CH 112.

The principles and methods of quantitative analysis, including titrimetry, spectrophotometry and potentiometry are used to determine the composition of various materials and the physical constants of substances.

CH 295 Special Topics in Chemistry

1-4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

Topics reflecting the special interests of students and staff. Designed for freshmen, sophomores, and non-majors.

CH 296 Special Topics in Chemistry

1-4 cr.

Graded S/U.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

Topics reflecting the special interests of students and staff. Designed for freshmen, sophomores, and non-majors.

CH 297 Directed Studies in Chemistry

1-4 cr.

Graded S/U.

May be repeated if topic differs up to four credit hours.

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

Independent study and investigative work. Advisor and research problem must be selected a semester prior to registration.

CH 298 Directed Studies in Chemistry

1-4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs up to four credit hours.

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

Independent study and investigative work. Advisor and research problem must be selected a semester prior to registration.

CH 321 Organic Chemistry I

4 cr. (3-0-3)

Credit cannot be earned in both CH 220 and CH 321.

Prerequisite: CH 112.

The chemistry of the aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons and their derivatives, the significance of the various groups in the molecule, and the nature of organic reactions.

CH 322 Organic Chemistry II

4 cr. (3-0-3)

Prerequisite: CH 321.

A continuation of CH 321. The chemistry of carbonyl compounds and other groups, and some special topics are covered.

CH 340 Environmental Chemistry

5 cr. (3-0-6)

Prerequisites: CH 241 and CH 242.

A study of chemical interaction in natural and perturbed systems. Emphasis is placed on physical and analytical aspects with an introduction to the mathematics of data utilization.

CH 341 Physical Chemistry I

4 cr. (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: CH 241, CH 242, one year of calculus and physics, or instructor permission.

Theory, problems and experiments concerning the structure of atoms and molecules and the gaseous, liquid, and solid states.

CH 342 Physical Chemistry II

4 cr.  (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: CH 241, CH 242, one year of calculus and physics, or instructor permission.

Theory, problems, and experiments concerning chemical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, and the phase rule.

CH 415 Inorganic Chemistry

4 cr. (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: CH 341 and CH 342 or CH 341 and concurrent enrollment in CH 342, junior standing or instructor permission.

Comparative study of the chemical elements and their compounds with emphasis on periodic relations, principles of structure and bonding, kinetics of reactions, and spectral and thermodynamic properties. Topics include complex ions, defect crystals, electron deficient compounds, organometallic and bio-inorganic chemistry. A variety of inorganic compounds are prepared and studied.

CH 435 Gas and Liquid Chromatography

2 cr. (3-0-6)

This course is taught for one half of the semester.

Prerequisites: CH 322, junior standing or instructor permission.

A study of the principles, instrumentation, and analytical applications of gas and liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. GC, GC/MS and HPLC techniques are presented in the laboratory.

CH 436 Modern Spectrometry

3 cr. (2-0-3)

Prerequisites: CH 341, junior standing or instructor permission.

A study of principles, instrumentation, and analytical applications of modern spectroscopic methods including Mass, Infrared, UV/Visible and NMR spectroscopy. The theoretical basis for each type of spectroscopy, basic instrument design, and spectral analysis will be discussed with particular emphasis on the use of a combination of these methods in structural elucidation. Modern NMR experiments including 2-D spectroscopy will be discussed. Laboratory exercises will focus on instrument operation and data interpretation.

CH 437 Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

1 cr. (2-0-3)

This course is taught for one half of the semester.

Prerequisites: CH 341 or concurrent enrollment in CH 341, junior standing or instructor permission.

A study of principles, instrumentation, and analytical applications of atomic absorption spectroscopy techniques.  Lecture material will cover sample collection and preparation, sample atomization, optical instrumentation, spectral interferences, and data analysis. Atomic absorption techniques will be compared to inductively coupled plasma techniques. Laboratory exercises will focus on sample preparation, instrument operation, and data analysis.

CH 450 Introductory Biochemistry

4 cr. (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: CH 220 or CH 322, junior standing or instructor permission.

A study of the fundamental concepts of biochemistry, including the chemical and physical properties of biomolecules and the chemical basis of the major metabolic pathways.  Laboratory experiments teach basic biochemical techniques.

CH 452 Intermediary Metabolism

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CH 450, junior standing or instructor permission.

A course designed to follow Introductory Biochemistry, emphasizing metabolic processes and exposing students to current biochemical literature. Topics include the biosynthesis of lipids, amino acids, nucleic acids and the study of gene expression and protein synthesis. Abnormalities in metabolic processes that result in disease will be considered.

CH 454 Biochemical Techniques

4 cr. (0-0-12)

Prerequisites: CH 450, junior standing or instructor permission.

A laboratory course applying instrumental techniques to biochemical problems. Experiments include immunological assay, electrophoresis, radioisotope labeling, and purification and analysis of DNA.

CH 456 Protein Structure and Function

3 cr.

Prerequisites: CH 450, junior standing or instructor permission.

An investigation of the structure of proteins enhanced by the use of computer software with three dimensional images. The relationship between protein structure and function will be explored by studying enzymatic reaction mechanisms and kinetics.

CH 490 Senior Research and Seminar I

2-4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs up to four credit hours.

Prerequisites: Biochemistry or chemistry major and senior standing or instructor permission.

Some aspects of chemical research, pursued in cooperation with a research advisor. Oral and written reports and attendance at a weekly seminar are required. Advisor and research problem must be selected a semester prior to registration.

CH 491 Senior Research and Seminar II

2-4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs up to four credit hours.

Prerequisites: Biochemistry or chemistry major and senior standing and Instructor permission.

A continuation of CH 490. Open to students who have demonstrated exceptional competencies.

CH 492 Research in Water Science

2 cr.

Prerequisites: Water science major, junior standing or instructor permission, and CH 242. CH 340 is strongly recommended. (Same as BI 492).

A course to introduce students to environmentally related research. Projects are pursued in cooperation with a faculty research advisor. The research advisor and research problem must be selected a semester prior to registration. A written and final oral report are required.

CH 495  Special Topics in Chemistry

1-4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Prerequisites: Instructor permission and junior standing.

 Variable content, depending upon the specialties of the staff and special needs of the students.

CHN

(Modern Languages and Literatures Department)

CHN 101 Elementary Chinese I

4 cr.

Satisfies the formal communication studies requirement.

An Introductory course in the Chinese language and culture. Students learn rudimentary "survival" skills such as social etiquette, telling time and directions, talking about family, school and work, and writing and recognizing written characters.

CIS

(College of Business–Computer Information Systems)

All CIS courses numbered 120 and above are invalid after seven years.

CIS majors or minors must earn a minimum grade of C- in each CIS/IS course applying to their CIS major/minor.

CIS 110 Principles of Computer Information Systems

4 cr.

CIS 110 is the equivalent of IS 100, IS 101, IS 102 and IS 104.

Satisfies the formal communication studies requirement.

A course intended to establish basic computer literacy applicable to students' continuing education and career goals.  Students in the class make extensive use of the university computer facilities, using microcomputers and commercial software for word processing, spreadsheet analysis and database management. Computer terminology and programming are also introduced. Topics for lecture and reading include: computer systems (hardware and software), systems analysis, data communication, management information systems, and issues related to computers in society.

CIS 155 Software Development 1

2 cr.

Prerequisite: IS 120 (may be taken concurrently).

Study and practice of a visually-based programming language and application generator. Course will involve screen creation, logic development for event-driven screen operations, and object-orientation.

CIS 220 Network Concepts

2 cr.

Prerequisites:  IS 120 or instructor permission.

The course covers the detailed descriptions and workings of network hardware and software components, as well as the operation and management of a LAN. Hands-on demonstration and various hands-on assignments will be given. Students set up NIC's, hubs, and wiring for Ethernet, and other topologies.

CIS 228 Concepts of Help Desk/Call Center Operations

2 cr.

Prerequisites:  None.

This course will provide an overview of Help Desk and Call Center operations including the different types of help desks/call centers, career paths, and the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to be successful. Students will examine the people, processes, technology, and information required for successful support operations.

CIS 230 Novell Operating Systems

2 cr.

Prerequisites: CIS 220 or concurrent enrollment, or instructor permission.

In a laboratory setting students install a Novell LAN including severs and workstations. Students set up user directories, security, print servers, and application software. The course has both a lecture/discussion and a lab component.

CIS 234 Microsoft Network Operating Systems

2 cr.

Prerequisites: CIS 220 or concurrent enrollment or instructor permission.

The primary aim of this course is to help students learn to use the desktop interface and tools necessary for implementing an industrial strength workstation that will administer a small or large network. A second purpose is to help prepare students for the implementing and supporting Microsoft network certification credential. The course provides hands-on training in the following areas: planning, installation & configuration, managing resources, connectivity, running applications, monitoring & optimization, and troubleshooting.

CIS 250 Systems Development I

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CIS 155 and CIS 220 (may be taken concurrently). CIS 255 must be taken in subsequent semester.

The first of a two-course sequence is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the systems development process using prototyping, iterative, rapid application development approach.  Emphasis is on the early stages of the system development process presenting the concepts, tools, and methodologies used by the professional analyst.  Students are exposed to the issues and decisions associated with the rigors of managing a systems development project.

CIS 255 Systems Development II

4 cr.

Prerequisites:  CIS 250 (must be taken in prior semester) or instructor permission.

The second of a two-course sequence is designed to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the systems development process using a protyping, iterative, rapid application development approach. Emphasis is on the refinement and implementation of the system development process presenting the concepts, tools, and methodologies used by the professional analyst. Students are exposed to the issues and decisions associated with the rigors of managing a systems development project.

CIS 291 Internship in Computer Information Systems

1-8 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: Completion of the College of Business prerequisite courses and 48 semester hours and approval of internship coordinator.

Appropriate professional work experience at a computer installation. Students are required to document their work experience and fulfill requirements stipulated upon approval of the internship. 

CIS 295 Special Topics in Computer Information Systems

1-4 cr.

Designed for freshmen and sophomores and as a service course. If topic differs, may be repeated for credit with permission of instructors. Topics dependent on the special interests of students and staff.

CIS 297 Directed Studies in Computer Information Systems

1-4 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisite: College of Business permission.

Individual investigations of a special topic in information systems.

CIS 298 Directed Studies in Computer Information Systems

1-4 cr.

Prerequisite: College of Business permission.

Individual investigations of a special topic in information systems.

CIS 330 Novell Certification Preparation

3 cr.

Prerequisites: CIS 230 or concurrent enrollment or instructor permission.

This course is designed as an in-depth study of the most complex functions and features of installing, configuring and maintaining the latest Novell Netware based local area network system with the main goal being preparation for the CNA Exam. The course makes extensive use of practice exam software that simulates the testing environment on which students must perform actions according to a given scenario.

CIS 334 Microsoft Certificate Preparation

3 cr.

Prerequisites: CIS 234 or concurrent enrollment or instructor permission.

This course is designed as a in-depth study of the most complex functions and features of installing, configuring, and maintaining the latest Windows Operating System with the main goal being preparation for the Microsoft Certified Professional Exam. The course makes extensive use of practice exam software that simulates the testing environment, including a mock interface on which students must perform actions according to a given scenario.

CIS 355 Web Applications Programming

3 cr.

Prerequisites: CIS 155 or other programming course and CIS 255 or permission of instructor.

This course teaches students how to program client/server applications for the Web, focusing on database integration using SQL. Topics cover scripting languages such as JavaScript, VBScript, or other current alternatives, using them to read input from Web forms, store and retrieve data from databases, and produce Web output. Emphasis is on business-oriented applications for the Web.

CIS 415 Systems Development Project

3 cr.

Prerequisites: CIS 255, CIS 464 (CIS 464 may be a corequisite with instructor's permission) and junior standing or permission of instructor.

A capstone course whose emphasis is on the development of a computer application by student project teams assigned to local businesses or university departments. Depending upon the project, the entire system development life cycle may occur in one semester, or students may only accomplish one phase per semester. Project teams learn project management skills through job assignments and weekly status meetings with the instructor. Class time is arranged by project.

CIS 416 Advanced Systems Development Project

1-3 cr.

Prerequisites: CIS 415 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

Additional experience with computer application development and implementation. The structure of the course is identical to CIS 415.

CIS 428 Help Desk/Call Center Management

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CIS 228, MGT 228, MGT 240, junior standing or permission of instructor.

This course serves as a capstone experience for students who are interested in management positions in the help desk/call center industry. Techniques for developing and managing a customer support center will be the focus of the course. Students will gain experience with the unique tools and technologies utilized in the support environment and learn how the information is applied to make more effective decisions.

CIS 430 Data Communication

3 cr.

Prerequisites: CIS 155, CIS 250 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

The course covers the theories and technical prerequisites of data communication. Subjects include hardware, fundamental communication concepts, voice communication, configurations, common carrier service offerings, network design, protocols and software, microcomputers and communication, local area networks, network management, and network security.

CIS 440 Management Information Systems

3 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and MKT 230, MGT 240, and FIN 351 or permission of instructor.

A course designed to provide students with majors in the College of Business with adequate background to be able to keep abreast of current developments in the use of computer information systems in supporting management functions.  Information systems have become essential for creating competitive firms, managing global corporations, and providing useful products and services to customers. This course considers the needs of organizations from an information systems standpoint.

CIS 464 Database Management Systems

3 cr.

Prerequisites: CIS 250 and junior standing or instructor permission.

This course provides a broad survey of all of the major topics in the field of database systems from an applied perspective.  The initial emphasis will be on relational database concepts, logical design, physical design, and SQL access but the course will also consider hierarchical and network models, and the advanced object-oriented and object/relational models. Supporting topics will include the entity-relationship model, database administration, data dictionaries and catalogs, backup and recovery, concurrency control, and database security. Also covered will be such contemporary topics as distributed database, client/server database, data warehousing, and data mining.

CIS 470 E-Commerce and E-Business

3 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

This course explores the impact of information technology concepts and advances on the ways in which business is conducted in electronic commerce arena, as well as information technology's impact on business activity in more traditional business markets. This exploration is designed to give the student: a) an appreciation for the scope and performance characteristics exhibited by current information technology as it relates to business, and b) some insight into current changes in the way business strategy is being implemented by E-Commerce firms.

CIS 490 Seminar on Information Systems and Information Technology

3 cr.

Prerequisites:  Junior standing or instructor permission.

This course provides students with an opportunity to cover the latest and emerging topics in the area of information systems and information technology. The course is directly aimed to keep students up-to-date with the changes in the information systems and information technology area. The course covers wide-ranging topics from all concentrations of information systems.

CIS 491 Internship in Computer Information Systems

1-8 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

Appropriate professional work experience at a computer installation. Students are required to document their work experience and fulfill requirements stipulated upon approval of the internship.

CIS 495 Special Topics In Computer Information Systems

1-4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

 Variable topics of current interest.

CIS 496 Special Topics in Computer Information Systems

1-4 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Designed for juniors and seniors and as a service course. If topics differ, may be repeated for credit. Topics dependent on the special interests of students and staff.

CIS 497 Directed Studies in Computer Information Systems

1-4 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and College of Business permission.

Individual research in computer information systems. Work is supervised through conferences with an advisor.

CIS 498 Directed Studies in Computer Information Systems

1-4 cr.

Prerequisite: Junior standing and College of Business permission.

Individual research in computer information systems. Work is supervised through conferences with an advisor.

CJ

(Criminal Justice Department)

CJ 110 Introduction to Criminal Justice

4 cr.

An introduction to the various subcomponents of the justice system: police, courts, and corrections. The course will illustrate how these interrelated components result in the administration of justice in a democratic society. Current problems faced by the criminal justice process will be discussed.

CJ 191 Training Seminar (Specific Topic)

1-4 cr.

Note: No more than 4 credits of CJ 191 and/or CJ 298 may be applied toward the AS or AAS degree programs.  CJ 191 and CJ 298 do not apply toward the bachelor degree.

This course is for criminal justice elective credit and may be applied toward the criminal justice associate or applied science degree program. It cannot be used for the criminal justice minor or the criminal justice bachelor degree program. This is a training course specifically designed for the topic at hand. Course may include lectures, discussions, and field experiences as the specific topic indicates. This course may be taken more than once under a different topic.

CJ 212 The Law Enforcement Function

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CJ 110 or instructor permission.

The role of law enforcement in the criminal justice system and society at large is explored. Emphasis is placed on the history and current practices of policing, the demands and rewards of careers in law enforcement, and the dilemma inherent in policing a free society. The course is designed to provide students with realistic expectations about policing, as well as to promote critical thinking about the appropriate role of the police in society.

CJ 213 The Judicial Function

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CJ 110 or instructor permission.

An examination of the criminal court system and criminal process with an analysis of the major judicial decision-makers, i.e., prosecutors, defense attorneys, judges, and the courtroom work group. Special attention is given the empowerment of the judiciary, from original through appellate jurisdiction.

CJ 214 The Investigative Process I

4 cr.

Note: This course was previously numbered CJ 314 The Investigative Process I.

Prerequisites: CJ 110 or instructor permission.

Theory of investigation, crime scene conduct, collection and preservation of physical evidence; overview of methods used in scientific interpretation of evidence; presentation of evidence to the judicial system.

CJ 220 The Corrections Functions

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CJ 110 or instructor permission, or enrollment in Correctional Officer Certification program.

Introduction to philosophy, theory and practice involved in dealing officially with convicted offenders; appraisal of treatment and post-correctional practices plus functions of probation and parole are analyzed. Problems, trends and issues are identified.

CJ 221 Roles of the Corrections Client

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CJ 110, CJ 220 or instructor permission, or enrollment in Correctional Officer Certification program.

Study of offenders in terms of their personal background and definitional dimensions. Attitudes, behavior, and criminal careers are examined to help develop realistic perspective on crime and criminals.

CJ 227 Correctional Institutions

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CJ 110, CJ 220 or instructor permission, or enrollment in Correctional Officer Certification program.

The development, structure, and function of correctional institutions, including jails. Emphasis is placed on the principles and strategies of custody and treatment as they pertain to the confined offender. The propriety and effectiveness of the custody continuum are examined.

CJ 245 Legal Issues in Corrections

4 cr.

Prerequisites:  CJ 110, CJ 220, or instructor permission, or enrollment in Correctional Officer Certification program.

An overview of the major issues, trends and the political and social dimensions of convictions. An analysis of constitutional law, court decisions, current legislation of the federal and state law affecting prisons and the judicial proceedings. Description of Michigan internal review process in institution and field disciplinary matters. Examination of a forum for the legal rights of prisoners and the responsibilities of the legal system, and the adjudication of juveniles and the alternatives to incarceration. Examination of the impact of federal court review on state and local corrections systems. Description of recent legal decisions affecting Michigan corrections.

CJ 255 Drugs, Crime and the Justice System

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CJ 110 or permission of the instructor.

This course describes and examines the history and current state of the illegal drug problem in the United States from the early 1800's to the present day. This includes the nature of illegal drug use, the drug-crime connection, illegal drug production and trafficking, the structure of illegal drug enterprises, drug user profiles, drug control policy and treatment programs, and the drug legalization debate.

CJ 263 Criminology

4 cr.

Cross-listed with SO 263.

Prerequisites: SO 101 or SO 113 and CJ 110 or instructor permission.

This course explores the nature, extent, causes, and methods of treatment and prevention of crime and criminality. Emphasis is placed on theories and methods of studying crime and criminal behavior as social phenomena.

CJ 275 Legal Aspects of Retail Security

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CJ 110 or permission of the instructor.

This course examines the legal environment surrounding the private security profession. It is critical to realize that there are major legal restraints upon security officers that help ensure both the protection of the public and their employer. As with public police, in the area of private security there is also a need to strike a balance between the protection of one's business and protecting the individual liberty and civil rights of suspects. As a result, it's extremely important for professional security officers to understand how to avoid incurring civil liability when they take action to protect their business and its customers.

CJ 276 Retail Loss Prevention Management

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CJ 110 or instructor permission.

This course focuses on retail loss prevention issues from a supervision and management perspective.  It discusses the role of loss prevention within the corporate management structure.  It explores classic and contemporary management theory along with basic roles and functions of managers and supervisors.  It is designed to assist individuals currently holding or aspiring to management positions in implementing realistic loss prevention strategies in a mass retail environment.  The student will be introduced to fundamental principals of management theory with an emphasis in applying them to current-day issues in a retail setting.  Whenever possible, reference will be made to current cases or incidents that relate to material under discussion.

CJ 280 Criminal Law

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CJ 110 or instructor permission.

Analysis and classification of substantive common law and statutory criminal offenses; defenses and other limitations on criminal capacity.

CJ 290 Methods of Inquiry in Criminal Justice

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CJ 110 or instructor permission.

Note: This course was previously numbered CJ 210.

This course will expose students to the sources of information available about the field of criminal justice; prepare students to be intelligent consumers of criminal justice research; foster the ability to critically evaluate “facts” and findings relevant to the field; and illustrate the difference between empirical findings and “conventional wisdom.”  Students will develop skills necessary for academic and professional growth and competency in accessing, analyzing, and communicating information about criminal justice issues.

CJ 292 Criminal Justice Leadership Development

2 cr.

Prerequisite: CJ 110 Introduction to Criminal Justice. Note: CJ 292 will be a prerequisite for all 300-400-level CJ courses. This course is designed as a mid-point assessment class and must be taken prior to entering into any CJ 300-400 level courses.

This course introduces students to the concept of leadership and the role that it plays in managing criminal justice organizations. It will also explore opportunities for career development and advancement in our system of justice.  Students will first be introduced to the essentials of criminal justice agencies and their management with a special focus on leadership and problem solving.  Skills are developed through the hands-on application of different theories of leadership and participation in exercises emphasizing effective agency design, communication, team-building and group dynamics, conflict resolution, motivation, and organizational design.  Students also learn how to respond to and benefit from organizational change and conflict.  Finally, students will explore the concept and purpose of professional development and advancement strategies for employees within criminal justice agencies.

CJ 295 Special Topics in Criminal Justice

1-4 cr.

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

The study of special issues in criminal justice.

CJ 296 Local Jail Corrections Academy

6 cr.

Graded S/U.

These credits can only be counted toward the Associate of Applied Science in Corrections.

The Local Jail Corrections Academy consists of 160 hours of classroom instruction involving, ethics, stress management, sexual harassment, cultural diversity, prisoner behavior, suicide awareness, correctional law, interpersonal communication, fire safety, report writing, defensive tactics, custody and security, and booking and intake.  This Academy is approved through the Michigan Correction Officers Training Council (MCOTC).  The Academy is a requirement for employment in the field of corrections and, therefore, students who have already completed the Academy will be given 6 advanced placement credits toward this degree.

CJ 297 State Corrections Academy

12 cr.

Graded S/U.

These credits can only be counted toward the Associate of Applied Science in Corrections.

The State Corrections Academy consists of 640 hours of corrections training, including 320 hours of classroom training and 320 hours of specific, supervised, on-the-job training.  This Academy is approved through the Michigan Correction Officers Training Council (MCOTC).  The Academy is a requirement for employment in the field of corrections and, therefore, students who have already completed the Academy will be given 12 advanced placement credits toward this degree.

CJ 298 Directed Study

1-4 cr.

Note: No more than 4 credits of CJ 191 and/or CJ 298 may be applied toward the AS or AAS degree programs.  CJ 191 and CJ 298 do not apply toward the bachelor degree.

Prerequisites: Instructor and department permission.

Individual research on an advanced level in the student’s field of interest as approved and directed by the major professor.

CJ 299 Police Academy

12 cr.

Graded S/U.

Note: These credits can only be applied toward the Associate of Applied Science in Law Enforcement degree.

Prerequisite: Admission to NMU Regional Police Academy.

The Regional Police Academy is a 15 week, 900 hour police training school designed to provide basic law enforcement training to in-service and pre-service recruits. At the successful completion of academy training, a recruit becomes certifiable as a police officer through the Michigan Law Enforcement Officers Training Council. This training is transferable to all states but Hawaii.

CJ 302 Community Relations and Crime Prevention

4 cr.

May not be taken if the student has previously taken LE 300 Police-Community Relations or LE 400 Crime Prevention.

Prerequisites: CJ 110, CJ 290 and junior status or instructor permission.

A survey of the field of relationships between policing agencies and the communities they serve. Emphasis is placed on communication and orientation toward common goals, with a focus on the part that crime prevention techniques play in reducing current community problems.

CJ 303 Victims in Criminal Justice

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CJ 110, CJ 290, junior standing or instructor permission.

The role of the victim of crime in the American criminal justice process including: the needs, wants, expectations of the victim of crime, and how the criminal justice system does or does not address them; survey of the historical development of the place of the victim within the criminal justice process; discussion of victim-oriented programs such as restitution and victim compensation.

CJ 315 Criminal Procedure

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CJ 110, CJ 290, junior standing or instructor permission.

Rules of evidence and legal procedure in important areas such as arrest, force, search and seizure.

CJ 323 Community-Based Corrections

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CJ 110, CJ 290, junior standing or instructor permission.

This is a course on non-institutional corrections which focuses on the contemporary means and philosophy of positive intervention in the lives of selected offenders in an effort to facilitate improved social functioning. Specific attention is given to such critical corrections issues as: resource brokering, problem solving, accountability, and communication. Methods and techniques of service delivery within the context of probation, parole, diversion, halfway houses, and other community settings are stressed.

CJ 412 Crisis Intervention and Stress Analysis

4 cr.

May not be taken if the student has already taken LE 410 Police Crisis Intervention or LE 415 Police Stress Analysis.

Prerequisites:  CJ 110, CJ 290, and junior standing or instructor permission.

The course will examine the challenges and risks of the various “front line” crisis intervention situations encountered by police and corrections officers. Emphasis is on the dynamics of interpersonal relations and intervention techniques, especially in conflict-oriented situations. Alternatives available to officers, as well as the relative roles of other legal and social agencies, will be discussed. The second half of the course will focus on stress issues relative to police and corrections personnel. Basic concepts in the psychological and physiological effects of stress will be discussed. This information will be applied to specific stressors common to police and corrections officers, administrators and officers’ family life.

CJ 414 The Investigative Process II

4 cr.

Prerequisites:  CJ 110, CJ 290, 214, junior standing or instructor permission.

The actual gathering, identifying, preserving, and analyzing of evidence. The course prepares the student to write investigative reports that can be introduced into a court of law. It stresses the legal importance of all types of evidence and the probability of their acceptance in a court.

CJ 426 International Crime and Comparative Criminal Justice Systems

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CJ 110, CJ 290, junior standing or instructor permission.

This course explores the justice systems of various countries in depth, and compares the significant similarities and differences between them and the United States. Both statutory and common law are analyzed, as well as crime rates, prevention, detention, and judicial procedures.

CJ 431 Issues in Criminal Justice Administration

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CJ 110, CJ 290, junior standing or instructor permission.

This course focuses on new management and administrative requirements of the criminal justice complex in transition. Attention is paid to the development of the understanding of the implementation of processes such as job enrichment, leadership and power, planning for change, motivational and communication theory to the administration and coordination of the criminal justice system and the management of its components.

CJ 435 Domestic and International Terrorism

4 cr.

Prerequisite: CJ 110 and CJ 290, Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

This course examines the history and current state of the problem of domestic and international terrorism. This includes the types and nature of terror, profiles of the individuals, organizations, and nation states involved in terrorism, their motivations and targets, the attacks against the United States, strategies currently used to control and prevent terrorism, and the prospects for the future.

CJ 440 Discretionary Justice

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CJ 110, CJ 290, junior standing or instructor permission.

In-depth study of the use of discretion in criminal justice taught in seminar style. Students are required to participate in realistic simulated decision making situations that reveal subjective and subtle influences on the decision makers. Police, institution classification, and parole decision issues are emphasized.

CJ 490 Professional Development and Assessment

2 cr.

Note: This course replaces CJ 489 Theory and Ideology of Criminal Justice.

Prerequisites: CJ 110, CJ 290 and senior standing or instructor permission.

This course is intended to provide students with information and perspectives necessary for a successful career search in criminal justice.  Students will be asked to actively engage in various assignments that will heighten their awareness of the importance of communication skills, interviewing skills, and overall professional preparation.  It will encourage students to explore their values, skills, and competencies in order to come to a better understanding of the unique qualities and abilities that each may contribute in their chosen profession.  Finally students will assist with the accomplishment of the department's assessment objectives by participating in select activities and discussions.

CJ 491 Internship in Criminal Justice

4-16 cr.

Graded S/U.

May be applied as general elective credit only.

Prerequisites:  All 100 and 200 level CJ core courses, junior standing, 2.7 cumulative GPA and permission of the Criminal Justice Internship Coordinator.

Supervised field experience through university-arranged placements in law enforcement, corrections, loss prevention or other criminal justice agencies.

CJ 495 Special Topics in Criminal Justice

1-4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs for 8 credit hours.

Prerequisites: CJ 110, CJ 290, junior standing or instructor permission.

The study of special issues in criminal justice at a more advanced level. Sometimes used to accommodate the training of visiting lecturers.

CJ 497 Teaching/Research Apprenticeship

1-4 cr.

Note: Only 4 credit hours of CJ 497 and/or CJ 498 may be applied toward the major.

Prerequisites: CJ 110, CJ 210, junior standing or instructor permission.

Directed apprentice activities in research or teaching.  Students will work under close supervision of their major professor.

CJ 498 Directed Study

1-4 cr.

Note: Only 4 credit hours of CJ 497 and/or CJ 498 can be applied toward the major.

Prerequisites: CJ 290, junior standing or instructor permission.

Individual research on an advanced level in student’s field of interest as approved and directed by major professor.

CLS

(Clinical Laboratory Science Department)

CLS 100 Obtaining a Blood Specimen

1 cr. (2-0-4)

Graded S/U.

Meets first four weeks of the semester. A course designed to teach any interested student phlebotomy skills by venipuncture and dermal puncture methods. Lecture topics of infection control, safety, ethics, communication, specimen processing, selection of anti-coagulants, order of draw, prioritizing requests, complications, and accidental needlesticks are some of the major areas addressed in this course.

CLS 109 Introduction to Diagnostic Sciences

1 cr. (1-0-1 on alternating weeks)

Prerequisite: High school biology recommended.

The course is designed to introduce the students to a variety of diagnostic tests for various aspects of the clinical laboratory.  The various tests represent analytes commonly measured because of their diagnostic or screening value for major health conditions in society such as diabetes, heart attacks, anemia, and infection.  Other areas of consideration will be blood typing and pregnancy testing.  Accuracy, safety, and quality control will be stressed throughout.

CLS 150 Phlebotomy Practicum

4 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: CLS 100 and 120.

Extensive clinical experience in phlebotomy. The student will log a total of 160 hours at assigned clinical agencies.

CLS 190 Microscopy and Laboratory Techniques

1 cr. (1-0-2 on alternating weeks)

The course is designed to develop basic laboratory skills in the use of laboratory tools that are fundamental to science exploration and practice.  The student will learn the principles of microscopy, the use and adjustment of microscopes, scope maintenance, slide preparation and definition of terms.  Microscopy techniques will be employed using the compound bright-field, phase and dark-field microscopes.  Polarized and Fluorescence microscopy will also be discussed.  Microscopy techniques will include focusing, ocular lens adjustment, achieving Koehler illumination, troubleshooting problems, use of filters, micrometry etc.  Basic generalized laboratory techniques will also be addressed including spectrophotometry and proper pipetting techniques (using a variety of pipettes).

CLS 200 Urine and Body Fluid Analysis

1 cr. (2-0-2)

Course meets last 6 weeks of the semester.

Prerequisites: High school biology recommended.

A study of urine and body fluid examinations. The course will include macroscopic, chemical and microscopic examination of various fluids. Where appropriate, confirmatory and/or supplemental tests will be discussed. Significance, principles, reference ranges, sources of error and data correlation of manual and automated methods will be emphasized in each type of analysis.

CLS 201 Clinical Hematology/Coagulation

3 cr. (2-0-3)

Prerequisites: CLS 120 or BI 104 or BI 202 or instructor permission.

Study of blood-forming organs, the morphologic, biochemical and functional aspects of the cellular components of blood; the mechanisms of hemostasis. Disorders of the blood are discussed and correlated with the abnormal results found in corresponding lab tests. Manual and automated methods are used in the laboratory with emphasis placed on diagnostic procedures and those used to differentiate normal and abnormal states.

CLS 202 Clinical Chemistry

4 cr. (3-0-3)

Prerequisites: One year of high school chemistry and one semester of college chemistry or instructor permission. CLS 120 recommended

Examination of the methods of analysis and clinical significance of a variety of analytes found in an assortment of body fluids. Correlation of results from different laboratory tests, basic statistics, and quality control measures are also explored. Performance of quantitative and qualitative manual and automated clinical chemistry assays typically done in hospital laboratories.

CLS 203 Immunohematology

3 cr. (2-0-3)

Prerequisites: One year of high school biology or one semester of college biology including human anatomy and physiology, or cell biology; CLS 213 or concurrent enrollment or instructor permission. CLS 120 recommended. Winter semester only.

Fundamentals of blood banking in the ABO, Rh and other blood group systems as applied to recipients and donors of blood; blood component preparation and utilization; transfusion; transfusion complications; quality control and problem-solving; new issues in transfusion medicine. Laboratories include techniques used in immunology/serology; blood grouping; compatibility testing; and antibody identification.

CLS 204 Clinical Microbiology

2 cr.

Prerequisites: BI 104 or BI 202, CLS 120 or instructor permission.

Introduction to the medically important bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites. Infectious diseases are discussed by organ systems including the role of normal flora and clinical information relevant to each. Current practices in the collection and transportation of clinical specimens and infection control issues are emphasized.

CLS 213  Clinical Immunology and Serology

 1 cr. (1-0-0)

Prerequisite:  One year of high school biology or one semester of college biology, including anatomy and physiology or cell biology; Or instructor permission; chemistry recommended. Offered Winter semester only. 
An introduction to immunology, the immune response and the application of immunological concepts to serological testing in the clinical laboratory.

CLS 214 Diagnostic Microbiology

3 cr. (1-1-2.5)

Prerequisites: CLS 204 or concurrent enrollment or permission of instructor.

Methods of the isolation and identification of microbial pathogens including clinically significant bacteria, fungi, and parasites. Laboratory diagnostic techniques focus on biochemical characterization, serologic testing, rapid identification methods, susceptibility testing and microscopic examination.

CLS 250 Clinical Practice

1-2 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: Acceptance for a clinical placement by the Clinical Laboratory Sciences Department.

This course is designed for all programs with a clinical practicum that extends into the summer months. This course represents each different discipline identified by the appropriate suffix.

CLS 250A Clinical Practice

2 cr.

Students will practice their clinical assistant skills.

CLS 250T Clinical Practice

2 cr.

Students will practice their skills in phlebotomy and serological testing.

CLS 250S Clinical Practice

1 cr.

Students will practice their skills in specimen processing and routine urinalysis.

CLS 250C Clinical Practice

2 cr.

Students will practice their skills in routine cytology and histologic techniques.

CLS 250G Clinical Practice

2 cr.

Students will become oriented to the cytogenetic or molecular biology laboratory that includes the application of safety policies and learning specialized nomenclature, definitions, and some diagnostic genetic techniques. A review of human chromosome and G and Q band patterns are included for cytogenetic students.

CLS 250H Clinical Practice

2 cr.

Students will practice techniques in advanced histology.

CLS 250M Clinical Practice

1 cr.

Students will practice techniques in advanced diagnostic microbiology.

CLS 251, 252, 253, 254 Sophomore Practicum

14 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: A grade of "C-" or better in CLS 120, 200, 201, 202, 203 and 204; a minimum 2.00 GPA overall, NMU cumulative and in the major, and faculty recommendations.

A six-month practicum in an affiliated clinical laboratory under the supervision of clinical laboratory professionals. Includes practical experience in all areas of the clinical laboratory including LIS. Current affiliates are in Upper Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota. The practicum is represented by CLS 250T and the following four courses:

CLS 251 Clinical Hematology Practicum

3 cr.

Includes hematology and coagulation.

CLS 252 Clinical Chemistry Practicum

4 cr.

Includes chemistry and routine urinalysis.

CLS 253 Blood Banking Practicum

3 cr.

Includes blood banking.

CLS 254 Clinical Microbiology Practicum

4 cr.

Includes bacteriology, mycology, and parasitology.

CLS 298 Directed Studies in Clinical Laboratory Science

1-4 cr.

For associate degree programs. May apply to a baccalaureate degree program with the approval of the student's major department. Usually elected only once.

Individual directed study in a clinical laboratory science topic. Students study topics through laboratory projects, independent reading and/or a written paper.

CLS 301 Advanced Hematology/Coagulation

3 cr.

Prerequisites: CLS 201 and 251 or instructor permission.

Survey of hematopoiesis, blood cell derivation, iron metabolism, erythropoiesis, physiological classification and laboratory investigation of anemias, leukocyte physiology and function, disorders of phagocytosis, and platelet physiology and function. Key laboratory tests are identified with each area of assessment. Learning activities include computer-assisted instruction, laboratory problems, and correlation of clinical data. This course builds upon CLS 201 and the student's clinical experience.

CLS 302 Advanced Clinical Chemistry

2 cr.

Prerequisites: CLS 202 and 252. MA 171 recommended.

A lecture-laboratory course involving a problem-solving orientation to laboratory practice. Learning activities include a laboratory method comparison, laboratory problems of technical and diagnostic focus, written assignments pertaining to hormones and therapeutic drugs, and computer-assisted instruction.

CLS 303 Advanced Immunohematology

2 cr.

Prerequisites: CLS 203 and CLS 253; or instructor permission.

Advanced studies in antibody-antigen interaction in relation to blood component therapy. Learning activities include laboratory problems and CAI focusing on complex blood-banking problems; a written assignment for selection of methods for clinical analysis and special techniques in laboratory practice.

CLS 304 Advanced Clinical Microbiology

2 cr.

Prerequisites: CLS 204, CLS 214 and CLS 254 or instructor permission.

A study of selected topics in bacteriology, mycology, parasitology, and virology utilizing computer-assisted instruction, written assignments and lab problems. Identification techniques and protocol will be evaluated for both common and infrequently isolated pathogens.

CLS 380, 381, 382, 383, 384 Histotechnology Practicum

30 cr.

Prerequisites: Completion of the required courses in the Histotechnician or Histotechnologist curriculum and acceptance by a clinical agency with an accredited histology training program.

A supervised full-time 6 month to 12 month clinical practicum in an accredited histology program. The practicum prepares students to assist in tissue related procedures to establish and confirm a patient's diagnosis. The preparation and staining of tissue involves a variety of procedures including aspects of enzyme histochemistry, electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry and molecular pathology. The practicum is represented by CLS 250H and the following courses:

CLS 380 Histotechnique I (Processing and Microtomy)

7 cr.

 

CLS 381 Histotechnique II (Staining, Clinical Correlation, Instrumentation, QC, etc.)

7 cr.

 

CLS 382 Histotechnique III (Grossing/Embedding, Microscopy)

3 cr.

 

CLS 383 Histochemistry/Pathology (Special stains, Electron Microscopy, DNA)

8 cr.

 

CLS 384 Advanced Histology (Special projects, Management, Clinical, Legal Procedures)

5 cr.

 

CLS 391 Laboratory Experience

1-3 cr.

May be repeated for up to 6 credits if the topic differs.

Prerequisites: Appropriate CLS courses (120, 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 214) for the designated experience, and permission of supervising faculty and Program Director.

A course subtitle on the student's transcript will describe the content for this course, e.g. CLS 391 Laboratory Experience in Hematology Student Laboratory. The course is designed to offer additional experience in the laboratory which may involve the following activities:  perform instrument set-up and shut down, trialing procedures before implementation, laboratory maintenance, implementing quality control procedures, reagent preparation and minor troubleshooting of instruments. Students gain valuable lab experience in a variety of areas beyond the limited exposure in the traditional CLS (non-practicum) classes.

CLS 420 Clinical Educational Practices

1 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Introduction of the laboratory professional to the basic techniques of training students in a clinical setting and presenting laboratory in-services. The principles of learning, the use of goals and objectives, and the analysis of a teaching module will be addressed first. Students will be required to teach two laboratory sessions and present one in-service to the Clinical Laboratory Sciences Department.

CLS 440, 441, 442, 443 Advanced Diagnostic Microbiology Practicum

14 cr.

Prerequisites: A grade of C- or better in all CLS courses, a minimum of 2.6 GPA overall and 2.0 GPA in the minor, CLT certification and CLS faculty recommendation. Junior standing or instructor permission. Students must also enroll in CLS 250M during the summer months.

An intense 5 month practicum in an approved clinical laboratory under the supervision of a clinical laboratory scientist or microbiologist. Includes both practical experience with emphasis on proficiency, special or unique procedures, problem solving, method evaluation, setting policy, and supervisory functions. The practicum is represented by CLS 250M and the following courses:

CLS 440 Advanced Clinical Bacteriology

8 cr.

 

CLS 441 Advanced Clinical Mycology

2 cr.

 

CLS 442 Advanced Clinical Parasitology

2 cr.

 

CLS 443 Advanced Clinical Mycobacteriology/Virology

2 cr.

 

CLS 451, 452, 453, 454 Senior Practicum

14 cr.

Prerequisites: a grade of "C-" or better in all CLS courses; a minimum 2.60 GPA overall and NMU cumulative, a minimum 2.00 GPA in the major, CLT certification and recommendations. Junior standing or instructor permission.

An intense, five month practicum in an affiliated clinical laboratory under supervision of clinical laboratory scientists. Includes both practical experience and further acquisition of theoretical principles in all areas of the clinical laboratory with emphasis on special testing, problem-solving and a variety of supervisory functions. Lectures or CAI will be offered regularly. The practicum is represented by CLS 250S and the following four courses:

CLS 451 Advanced Clinical Hematology Practicum

3 cr.

Includes hematology and coagulation.

CLS 452 Advanced Clinical Chemistry Practicum

3 cr.

Includes chemistry and special testing.

CLS 453 Advanced Clinical Immunohematology Practicum

4 cr.

Includes blood banking and serology areas.

CLS 454 Advanced Clinical Microbiology Practicum

4 cr.

Includes bacteriology, mycology, parasitology and virology.

CLS 460, 461, 462, 463 Cytogenetics Practicum

14 cr.

Prerequisites: Students must achieve a 2.6 GPA overall and cumulative and a minimum of 2.8 GPA in the major; students must achieve a grade of "B" or better in BI 111 and BI 206 or 312. In addition: cytogenetics track: student must achieve a "B" or better in BI 416 and BI 313 and a grade of "C" or better in all other major courses. Completion of the required courses in the diagnostic genetics curriculum and acceptance by an affiliated clinical agency. Junior standing or instructor permission.

An intense 6-month practicum in an affiliated full service laboratory under supervision of appropriately credentialed cytogenetics professionals. Includes both practical experience and theoretical principles in areas of bone marrow, peripheral and other specialized techniques and projects will be addressed. The practicum is represented by CLS 250G and the following courses:

CLS 460 Specimen Processing and Culture

4 cr.

 

CLS 461 Microscopic Analysis

4 cr.

 

CLS 462 Fish Technology

3 cr.

 

CLS 463 Specialized Tech/Projects

3 cr.

 

CLS 470, 471, 472, 473 Molecular Biology Technology Practicum

14 cr.

Prerequisites: Students must achieve a "B" or better in BI 418 and CH 454 and a grade of "C" or better in all other major courses. Completion of the pre-clinical courses in the diagnostics genetics curriculum and acceptance by an affiliated clinical agency. Junior standing or instructor permission.

An intense 6-month practicum in an affiliated full service laboratory under supervision of appropriately credentialed Molecular Biology Technology professionals. Includes both practical experience and theoretical principles in areas of DNA purification, Southern Blot Analysis, and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Analysis. Specialized techniques and projects will also be incorporated. The practicum is represented by CLS 250G and the following courses:

CLS 470 DNA Purification

2 cr.

 

CLS 471 Southern Blot Analysis

5 cr.

 

CLS 472 PCR Analysis

5 cr.

 

CLS 473 MB Specialized Tech/Projects

2 cr.

 

CLS 480, 481, 482, 483, 484, 485, 486 Cytotechnology Practicum

32 cr.

Prerequisites: Completion of required courses in the cytotechnology curriculum and acceptance by a clinical agency with an accredited cytotechnology program. Junior standing or instructor permission.

A supervised full-time 12 month clinical practicum in an accredited cytotechnology program. It includes tissue preparation and staining techniques; microscopic study of cellular alterations indicative of cancer, pre-cancerous conditions, bacterial, viral and parasitic infections and hormonal abnormalities. The practicum is represented by CLS 250C and the following seven courses:

CLS 480 Cytology Orientation

1 cr.

 

CLS 481 Tissue Cytology I

8 cr.

Includes female genital tract.

CLS 482 Tissue Cytology II

8 cr.

Includes respiratory and G.I. tract.

CLS 483 Tissue Cytology III

8 cr.

Includes all other tissues.

CLS 484 Applied Clinical Practicum

5 cr.

 

CLS 485 Advanced Cytology Techniques

2 cr.

 

CLS 498 Directed Studies in Clinical Laboratory Science

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

May apply only to a baccalaureate degree program with the approval of the student's major department. Usually elected only once.

Individual directed study in a clinically related topic. Students study topics through research projects, independent reading, and/or a written paper.

CN

(Technology and Occupational Sciences Department)

CN 107 Construction Documents

3 cr. (2-0-2)

Survey of the content, preparation, application, and interpretation of various construction contract documents. The interrelationship of the documents is also discussed. The three major parts of construction documents are plans, specifications, and construction manual. Sample sets of documents are interpreted and developed using computer applications with word processing.

CN 151 Introduction to Construction

2 cr.

An overview of the industry, the relationships that exist among the various stages of construction, with activities and practices all emphasized.

CN 154 Construction Survey and Layout

3 cr. (2-0-2)

An introductory course covering theory, principles, and techniques of construction surveying.

CN 156 Construction Systems and Methods

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Basic systems and methods of constructing structures.

CN 158 Concrete

3 cr. (2-0-3)

Study and illustration of basic principles of masonry, concrete and concrete forming and procedures.

CN 191 Carpentry Internship

8 cr. (0-0-40)

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites:  DD 100, CN 107, CN 151, CN 154, CN 156, CN 158, WT 161.

This course places the students in an actual construction situation on a live job site. The student will receive hands-on experience in all phases of carpentry construction.

CN 251 Construction Field Operations

2 cr.

Prerequisites: CN 156 and CN 158.

An introductory course to acquaint the student with the requirements necessary to direct the field operations of a construction project.

CN 252 Codes and Inspection

3 cr.

Prerequisites: CN 158 or instructor permission.

Introduction to basic inspections that comply with local building codes and ordinances.

CN 253 Construction Estimating

3 cr.

Prerequisites: CN 107, CN 156 and CN158.

Introduction to estimating, using means and national reporting systems as a guide. Students are provided with theory, principles, and techniques to arrive at a total construction cost for a building project.

CN 278 Mechanical Systems

3 cr.

A course organized to provide basic understanding of design procedures of mechanical systems, flexibilities in each system, space required and at what point the job will be done.

CN 353 Soils and Foundations

3 cr. (2-0-2)

Study of basic theory and application detailed in ASTM (American Society of Testing Materials) procedures, developing a knowledge of fundamental principles and good judgment in foundation design supported by experience and scientific data.

CN 357 Legal Aspects of Construction

3 cr.

Prerequisite: CN 107.

Introduction to legal implications in the building industry.

CN 450 Project Control

3 cr.

Prerequisites: CN 253, junior standing or instructor permission.

Development of a mechanism for cost estimating and its relationship to other project control functions of scheduling, budgeting and cost control.

CN 458 Bidding Strategies

3 cr.

Prerequisites: CN 253 and CN 357, junior standing or instructor permission.

An advanced course involving student contribution on bidding strategies and a professional approach to analyzing this competitive information.

CN 459 Construction Management

3 cr.

Prerequisites: CN 458, junior standing or instructor permission.

In-depth orientation to construction management methods, major engineering and construction management techniques, and practices relating to the organization of a company.

CS

(Mathematics and Computer Science Department)

CS 101 Web Site Construction

4 cr.

This class covers all facets of web site construction, from the creation of a web site's content to technical definitions such as 'hit', and 'page view'.  Audio, video and 3D graphic formats will be explored.  Legal issues will be covered.  This class is designed for students of all majors.

CS 120 Computer Science I

4 cr.

Satisfies the formal communication studies requirement.

Prerequisites: MA 100 or equivalent or permission of instructor.

A first course in computer programming.  An introduction to computer science using the Java programming language.  Students in the course will be introduced to the development of graphical user interfaces and to object-oriented programming.

CS 120A Accelerated Computer Science I

4 cr.

Satisfies the formal communication studies requirement.

Prerequisites: MA100 and one high school computer class or equivalent.

This course covers the same range of topics as CS120, but carries some topics further, adding additional topics as appropriate.

CS 122 Computer Science II

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CS 120 or high school equivalent, or permission of instructor.

A continuation of the study of object-oriented programming with Java. The course will provide opportunity to develop fundamental programming skills. A primary focus of the course will be the study of object-oriented design. Fundamental data structures will be introduced in the course, but a full treatment of them will be given in CS 222.

CS 201 Programming in C++

3 cr.

Prerequisites: CS 122 or concurrent enrollment.

CS 201 teaches how to program in C++.  Topics include pointers, memory management, data structures, object oriented design, and file processing.

CS 222 Data Structures

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CS 122, CS 201 and either MA 240 or MA 340.

This course covers data structures and algorithms in depth. Topics covered include basic data structures (e.g., arrays, stacks, queues, linked lists, trees and graphs), an introduction to basic problem solving strategies and complexity analysis, sorting and searching algorithms, hashing techniques, and some advanced tree structures (e.g.,  AVL trees, B and B+ trees, splay trees and so on).

CS 228 Network Programming

 3 cr.

Prerequisites: CS 122 and CS 201.

This course covers the theory and programming of network applications.  Topics covered include programming Internet applications, client-server programming, and Internet protocols.

CS 255 Computing for the Elementary School Teacher

4 cr.

Satisfies the formal communication studies requirement.

Prerequisites: MA 150 or permission of instructor.

The primary focus of the course is on topics that relate to programming in a multimedia environment including the internet. The course projects concentrate on applications relevant to the school curricula.

CS 295 Special Topics in Computer Science

1-4 cr.

Designed for freshmen and sophomores.

May be repeated if topic differs with permission of instructor.

Topics reflecting the special interests of students and staff.

CS 297 Directed Studies in Computer Science

1-4 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisite: Available only with department head permission.

Individual investigations of a special topic in computer science.

CS 298 Directed Studies in Computer Science

1-4 cr.

Same as CS 297 except that letter grades are given.

CS 302 Unix System Administration

4 cr.

Prerequisites: Six credit hours in CS or CIS numbered 120 or above, system administration experience, or consent of instructor.

This is a hands-on course in Unix system administration. The topics will cover installing an operating system, user account management including the sharing of account information over a network, printer management including networked printing, disk management, including quotas, network connectivity, sharing files over a network, installing various servers including a web server, electronic mail management, security in a networked environment, and performance tuning. In addition, students will learn the substantial troubleshooting skills. Aspects of security will be discussed pertaining to the detection and correction of various attacks against a computer or network.

CS 322 Principles of Programming Languages

4 cr.

Prerequisites: MA 240, CS 222, and CS 330 (concurrent enrollment in CS 330 permitted) or permission of instructor.

This course will survey the concepts and characteristics that are currently employed in modern programming languages. These include the assignment effects, procedure activation, scope, rules, type systems for conventional imperative programming languages, and data encapsulation and inheritance in the object-oriented paradigm. This course will also cover concurrent and non-imperative languages (i.e., functional and logic). The implementation of high-level languages will be examined, including the major components of modern compilers (e.g., lexical analyzers, parsers, and machine code generation), compiler theory (e.g., push-down automata and formal grammars), and translator-based language design issues (e.g., compilers versus interpreters, single-pass versus multi-pass compilers).

CS 326 Object Oriented Design

3 cr.

Prerequisites: CS 222 or consent of instructor.

The aim of this course is to develop a thorough understanding of software engineering principles that support the development of large projects. Object-oriented design patterns will be emphasized in the course.

CS 330 Microcomputer Architecture

4 cr.

Prerequisite: An introductory laboratory course in a natural science or a computer programming course or permission of instructor.

Study of how computer hardware responds to stored instructions. Construction projects with logic circuits lead to the development of interfacing connections and the conceptual designs of microprocessors. Native language programming of the microprocessor functions is introduced in the context of the logic circuitry being controlled. Programming projects emphasize the software needed in common interfacing tasks.

CS 370 Intelligent Mobile Robots

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CS 201 or CS 330, or equivalent software or hardware experience.

This course teaches how to design, build, and program autonomous robots.  Topics include robot architecture (e.g., sensors, effectors, processors, and platforms), as well as adaptive behavior (e.g., navigation, machine learning, and evolutionary robotics).  A significant portion of the course incorporates hands-on experience with real robots as well as simulators.  The second half of the course will involve team-based projects and a final demonstration.

CS 422 Algorithms Design and Analysis

3 cr. 

Prerequisite: CS 222 and MA 161 or MA 271.

This course covers advanced algorithms and data structures, formal analysis of algorithm complexity, and the theory of computation. Topics can include algorithms design technique (e.g., divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming), upper bounds and lower bounds, graph algorithms, geometric algorithms, symbolic and numeric algorithms, string matching, NP-completeness, complexity classes, computability and undecidability and parallel and distributed algorithms.  Students finishing this course will learn the basic skills of designing and analyzing sequential and parallel algorithms.

CS 426 Operating Systems

3 cr.

Prerequisite: CS 228 and CS 330, junior standing or instructor permission.

This course explores the underlying concepts of modern operating systems. Topics include memory management, processor scheduling, security management, and file system design. Design concepts such as the microkernel architecture and object oriented operating systems are covered.  Examples are drawn from a wide variety of operating systems, including Windows NT and Linux. Students will be expected to perform hands on experiments with operating system behavior and make minor modifications to existing operating systems.  Students without CS 330 may enter with consent of instructor.

CS 442 Advanced Networking

3 cr.

Prerequisites: CS 228, junior standing or instructor permission.

The course teaches several higher level computer networking concepts, such as distributed objects and high level communication protocols. Network programming skills will be developed. Students will write and test networked programs using a variety of paradigms. Current topics of industry interest such as CORBA and DCOM will be covered. 

CS 444 Parallel and Distributed Processing

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CS 228, junior standing or instructor permission.

This is an introductory course in the uses and coordination of concurrent processes. Topics include threads, race conditions, mutual exclusion, interprocess communication, deadlock avoidance and parallel architecture (including networked computers).

CS 446 Computer Graphics

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CS 322 and MA 211, junior standing or instructor permission.

This course exposes our students to the concepts and techniques of computer graphics. Topics covered include geometric transformations, viewing, object hierarchy, input and interaction, curves and surfaces,  illumination and shading. In this course, students will design graphics applications.

CS 453 Computer and the Schools

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CS 122, junior standing or instructor permission.

Study of major applications of computing in the schools.

CS 460 Advanced Web Programming

3 cr.

Prerequisites: Six credit hours of computer science courses at the 200 level or above.

This course teaches students how to program client/server applications for the Web focusing on database integration.  Topics cover scripting languages such as Perl, PHP, or other current alternatives, using them to read input from Web forms and produce Web output.  SQL be used to interface with databases as the backend technology.

CS 470 Artificial Intelligence

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CS 222, junior standing or instructor permission.

This course takes students beyond the traditional algorithms of computer science. Students learn techniques for making computers behave more intelligently and adaptively than typical programs. The course includes a survey of the broad and dynamic field of computer intelligence, from the established techniques for automated reasoning, knowledge representation, and machine learning, to the newer areas of stochastic, adaptive systems, such as neural networks, genetic algorithms, or intelligent agents. A few specific methodologies will be explored in depth, through implementation and application to real world problems. The class will cover the topics listed above, recent advances in artificial intelligence, and any necessary background materials.

CS 480 Senior Project in Computer Science

3 cr.

Prerequisites: CS 222, CS 228, junior standing and permission of advisor.

This course involves a significant software development and implementation project.   Students will be expected to create significant new computer applications, typically involving writing more than 1,000 lines of new code, and using algorithms developed from material in earlier courses.  Students are expected to begin the project prior to registering for CS480.  Enrollment in CS480 allows the student to wrap up the project, including testing, documentation, and a demonstration and presentation to an evaluation committee of CS faculty, for feedback and grading.

CS 490 Special Projects in Computer Science

1-4 cr.

May be repeated if project differs.

Prerequisites: Prior arrangement with instructor and junior standing.

Development of projects of an extensive nature, working in small groups and in consultation with the instructor. The project would draw heavily upon, and substantially reinforce and extend, the student’s previous work in computer science and possibly related areas as well. Included would be the delineation of a major computer-related problem, followed by the design and implementation of a maintainable solution.

CS 491 Internship in Computer Science

1-8 cr.

Graded S/U.

May be repeated for credit, not to exceed eight credits total.

Only four credits may be applied to a computer science minor.

Prerequisites: Junior standing, minimum GPA of 3.00 and departmental approval.

The course provides on the job experience in the application of computer science principles. Internship positions are coordinated with the Job Search Office and the Math and Computer Science Department.

CS 495 Special Topics in Computer Science

1-4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs with permission of instructor.

Prerequisites: For upper division students and majors and minors.

Topics reflecting special interest of students and staff.

CS 496 Special Topics in Computer Science

1-4 cr.

Graded S/U.

Cross-listed as CS 495.

CS 497 Directed Studies in Computer Science

1-4 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: Available only with consent of department head.

Individual investigations of a special topic in computer science.

CS 498 Directed Studies in Computer Science

1-4 cr.

Same as CS 497 except that letter grades are given.

DD

(Engineering Technology Department)

DD 100 Technical Drafting with Introduction to CAD

4 cr. (2-1-2)

Introductory drafting and computer-aided design including sketching, lettering, instrument usage, orthographic projection, sectional views, auxiliary views, dimensioning, tolerancing, threads, fasteners, pictorial drawings, and computer graphic applications. This course is designed for students with little or no previous mechanical drafting or CAD experience.

DD 102 Engineering Graphics

3 cr.

Prerequisites: DD 100 or instructor permission.

Graphic problem solving with advanced orthographic projections techniques, including fundamentals of spatial relationships, auxiliary views, revolutions, intersections, developments, and vector analysis.

DD 103 Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing

2 cr. (1-0-2)

Prerequisites: DD 100 or instructor permission.

Principles and practices of using geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GDT) as found in contemporary industry. Interpretation, understanding, and implementation of the concept in design, drawing, and making of mechanical parts for production.

DD 105 Schematic/Diagram Drafting

2 cr. (1-0-2)

Students will learn to produce electrical/electronic, hydraulic/pneumatic, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) and piping drawings in accordance with contemporary industrial standards. Previous drafting experience is not required. Topics included are block diagrams, electronic schematics, wiring diagrams, hydraulic and pneumatics circuits, central air conditioning and related piping. Drawings will be computer generated (CAD) using symbols libraries.

DD 110 CAD Productivity and Customization

2 cr. (1-0-2)

Prerequisite: DD 100.

An introductory level course designed to acquaint the CAD student with drafting efficiency. Program customization will be explored to enhance the productivity of the individual and the office environment. Topics will include: Editing techniques, menu creation, LISP routines, and proper drawing planning.

DD 202 Product Development and Design

4 cr. (2-1-2)

Prerequisites: DD 100 or instructor permission.

Graphic fundamentals, problem solving concepts and the design process are applied toward the development and design of products. The course includes techniques in graphic presentation, computer aided design, and technical illustration.

DD 203 Industrial Drawing and Design

4 cr. (2-1-2)

Prerequisite: DD 100 or instructor permission.

Special areas of industrial drawing are taught. Precision dimensioning-tolerancing, machine drawings, electrical-electronic schematics, pneumatics-hydraulics, tooling, computer assisted graphics, use of handbooks and catalogs, and special drafting.

DD 205 Architectural Presentation Techniques

2 cr. (1-0-2)

Fundamentals of architectural presentation drawings including two-point perspective, elevation rendering, plan presentation drawing, basic shade and shadow techniques, and entourage.

DD 206 Architectural and Industrial Prototypes

2 cr. (1-0-2)

An introductory level course designed to acquaint the student with methods and techniques of preparing industrial form and prototypes. Miniature scale mock-ups are developed and presented to illustrate the design technique.

DD 207 Architectural Design

4 cr. (2-1-2)

Beginning course in architectural design fundamentals. Student develops basic skills and techniques required for the architectural profession. A study of concepts and procedures essential to architectural design including site analysis, programming, schematics, and design development. The student solves a practical design problem and prepares a complete graphic solution.

DD 208 Architectural Detailing

4 cr. (2-1-2)

Introduction to small commercial and industrial building construction techniques, materials, and methods. Included are foundation, wall and roof construction requirements for various building structures, along with comparison of structural materials and methods and suitable application to various structures. The investigation of building uses and functions and consideration of equipment, services and accessory facilities are integral to this course.

DD 214 Structural Design

3 cr.

Prerequisite: IT 211.

Basic approach to the design of structural members in building of usual types of construction, spans and story heights where many of the more sophisticated refinements permitted by modern codes are not warranted. Included are the principles of structural mechanics, design of steel and wood beams and columns; structural connections, and reinforced concrete systems.

DD 295 Special Topics in Computer Aided Design

1-4 cr.

Prerequisite: Advisor permission.

Specialized work not covered by other courses.

DD 298 Directed Study and Research

1-4 cr.

Prerequisite: Department permission.

Selection of problem in area of emphasis, specialized instruction and experiences to reinforce technical skill and knowledge. Written reports of work are required.

DD 302 Architectural Drawing-Residential

4 cr. (2-1-2)

Prerequisites: DD 100 or instructor permission.

Conventions and practices used in modern home building, planning, general knowledge related to consumer housing, and graphic presentation of working drawings and specifications. Emphasis upon vacation-recreational housing and complete exhibits for residential housing.

DD 303 Architectural Drawing-Commercial

4 cr. (2-1-2)

Prerequisites: DD 100 or instructor permission.

Architectural drawing emphasizing conventions and practices used in commercial architecture. Presentation drawings, perspective layout and planning, rendering, commercial prints and structural detailing are stressed.

DD 310 Three Dimensional Computer Modeling/Presentation

2 cr. (1-0-2)

Prerequisites: DD 110 and DD 102 or DD 207 or instructor permission.

This course explores the use of three-dimensional design in both the engineering and architectural disciplines. Through the uses of solids modeling and parametric design, engineered parts are created, and analyzed. Architectural prototypes are created, displayed and analyzed through surface modeling.

DD 402 Senior Design Project

4 cr. (1-0-6)

Prerequisites: IT 380, senior standing or instructor permission and completion of all other minor requirements.

This course will provide the graduating senior in a computer aided drafting minor experience in design of an appropriate project in his or her area of specialization. The course calls upon the student to use all of his previous design and drafting experiences to create the solution to a problem(s).

DD 495 Special Topics in Computer Aided Design

1-4 cr.

Prerequisite: Advisor permission and junior standing.

Specialized work not covered by other courses.

DD 498 Directed Study and Research

1-4 cr.

Prerequisite: Department permission and junior standing.

Selection of problem in area of emphasis, specialized instruction and experiences to reinforce technical skill and knowledge. Written reports of work are required.

EC

(Economics Department)

EC 101 The American Economy

4 cr.

Not open to students who have credit in, or are currently enrolled in, another economics course.

May be counted toward a major or minor in economics.

Satisfies the foundations of social sciences requirement.

Introduction to the structure, processes, and problems of the American economic system. The historical development of the market economy is emphasized with discussion of the major economic institutions, such as corporations, cooperatives, market competition, and the banking system. Some introduction to the functioning of supply and demand in price determination is included.

EC 201 Microeconomic Principles

4 cr.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or EC 101 or instructor permission.

Analysis of price determination and resource allocation in a market economy. Particular attention is paid to individual consumer and producer choice under a variety of market structures.

EC 202 Macroeconomic Principles

4 cr.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and EC 201 or instructor permission.

Continuation of Economics 201. Introduction to theories of national income, money, public finance and international transactions.

EC 320 Money, Banking, and Monetary Theory

4 cr.

Prerequisites: EC 201 and EC 202 or instructor permission.

Institutional description of money, commercial banking, central banking, deposit intermediaries, government finance, and foreign exchange. Theoretical analysis of the effect of monetary institutions on economic behavior, and applications of monetary theory to problems in macroeconomics.

EC 337 American Economic History

4 cr.

Cross-listed as HS 337.

Satisfies the foundations of social sciences requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Prerequisites: Completion of the foundations of communication requirement and sophomore standing.

Transformation of the American economy, with particular emphasis on the modern period of industrialization. The focus is resource allocation within the major theme of economic growth. Special attention is devoted to the role of the corporation, ethics, advertising, environment, labor, public policy decisions, critics and defenders of the economic order.

EC 345 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics

4 cr.

Prerequisites: EC101 or EC201, or instructor permission.

The subjects of this course include air and water pollution, climate change, acid rain, depletion of biodiversity and other environmental, natural resource, and land-use problems. This course allows students to apply tools of economic analysis to the study of current environmental and natural resource issues. Property rights, social welfare maximization, and cost-benefit analysis are some of the key concepts used during the course.

EC 350 Methods and Materials in Teaching Social Studies Education

4 cr.

Does not count toward the non-teaching economics major or any economics minor.

Prerequisite: Admission to methods phase of teacher education.

Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ED 349.

Survey of the concepts, materials, and strategies used in economics at the secondary level. The course includes practice in the construction of units, identification of objectives, selection of materials, and development of activities and procedures. Some discussion of evaluation and classroom management is included.

EC 401 Intermediate Microeconomics

4 cr.

Prerequisites: EC 201 and EC 202, junior standing or instructor permission.

Theoretical analysis of the behavior of the consumer, the firm, and other economic units, and of the determination of product and factor prices under various market structures. Application of theory to contemporary economic problems.

EC 402 Intermediate Macroeconomics

4 cr.

Prerequisites: EC 201 and EC 202, junior standing or instructor permission.  EC 320 recommended.

Analysis of savings, consumption, investment, and other aggregates in the national economy as related to determination of national income, employment, and prices. This is a course in macrostatics.

EC 405 Public Finance

4 cr.

Prerequisites: EC 201 junior standing or instructor permission.

Introduction to the theory of the public economy with emphasis upon the effects of government activity on allocation of scarce resources. Study of theories and practices related to government spending, taxing, borrowing, and management of the public debt.

EC 410 Managerial Economics

4 cr.

Prerequisites: EC 201, MA 171, junior standing or instructor permission.

The application of economic analysis to business problems. Economic techniques and principles used in formulating business policies are considered: forecasting, estimation and analysis of demand functions; estimation of production functions and cost functions; forms of competition, pricing techniques, and profits; application of linear programming and game theory.

EC 415 Labor Economics

4 cr.

Prerequisites: EC 201 junior standing or instructor permission.

Analysis and description of the U.S. labor force and labor markets. Wage determination for the firm, industry, and economy is examined. The impact of unions, licensing, and other institutional forces on wages and employment is evaluated.

EC 420 Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of social sciences requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Prerequisites: Completion of the foundations of communication requirement, junior standing or instructor permission. One course in economics recommended.

Broad view of economic systems, integrating aspects of political and social institutions with traditional and alternative economic theories and institutions. Topics will include worker self-management, class struggles, revolution, redistribution of income and wealth, anarchism, socialism and government control.

EC 425 International Economics

4 cr.

Prerequisites: EC 201 and EC 202, junior standing or instructor permission.

Introduction to the theory of international trade and finance with emphasis on the study of the gains from international specialization and exchange, the mechanisms of intercountry economic relations, the balance of payments, the correction of imbalances in international trade flows, and the effects and purposes of restrictions on trade. Attention is given to major contemporary international trade problems.

EC 435 Law and Economics

4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing or instructor permission. One course in economics (EC 101 or 201) recommended.

An exploration of the interface between the two disciplines of law and economics with emphasis on the economic analysis of law. The course is not so much about what the law is but why the law is as it is. Major topics include property, contract, torts, product liability, common law and crime.

EC 460 Economic Development

4 cr.

Prerequisites: EC 201 and EC 202, junior standing or instructor permission.

The meaning and characteristics of underdevelopment; survey of theories of growth and development; the problem of “disguised” unemployment, factor proportions and optimal techniques of production; the role of capital accumulation and foreign trade in industrialization; planning techniques for economic development.

EC 490 Seminar in Economics

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: EC 201 and EC 202, junior standing and instructor permission.

Topic determined by the specialties of the instructor.

EC 495 Special Topics in Economics

1-4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Prerequisites: Instructor permission and junior standing.

Variable content, depending upon the specialization of the instructor and special needs of the students.

EC 498 Directed Studies in Economics

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: EC 201 and EC 202, junior standing and instructor permission.

Readings and research under faculty supervision. Designed for advanced economics majors.

ED

(School of Education)

See "Teacher Selection and Retention Standards" under the "School of Education" section of this bulletin for minimum grade point average requirements.

ED 201 Introduction to Education

2 cr.

Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education.

An opportunity for the student to explore a career in education. In addition to providing background information on the organization, control, supervision, financing, and professional aspects of American schooling, the course provides a foundation for content presented in other education courses. A central focus of the course is the relationship of school, the workplace, and citizenship in American society. Basic skills and traits necessary for success in the teaching profession are assessed in a number of ways in the course.

ED 222 Classroom Management

1 cr.

A study through a variety of techniques of methods to manage behavior in the classroom. Field experience may be involved.

ED 223 Multicultural Education

1 cr.

A study of how multicultural and global perspectives can be reflected in curricular design and planning; instructional design, practice and evaluation; and teachers’ and students’ knowledge, attitudes and behavior. Field experience may be involved.

ED 230 Teaching and Learning in the Elementary Classroom

4 cr.

Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education.

This course is an introduction to contemporary theories of teaching and learning for elementary education students. The course will focus on the connections of these theories to classroom practice as they relate to children of varying abilities from birth to early adolescence. Teacher-student relationships are observed and discussed. This course includes field experience.

ED 231 Teaching and Learning in the Secondary Classroom

4 cr.

Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education.

This course is an introduction to contemporary theories of teaching and learning for secondary education students. The course will focus on the connections of these theories to classroom practice as they relate to children of varying abilities at early to late adolescence. Teacher-student relationships are observed and discussed. This course includes field experience.

ED 295 Special Topics in Education

1-4 cr.

An opportunity for freshmen and sophomores to study problems in education that are not part of the regular offerings.

ED 301 Dimensions of American Education

2 cr.

Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education and ED 201.

Exploration of historical, philosophical, political, economic, social and legal dimensions of American education in order to gain insight into the nature, purposes, and results of public and private schooling. Consideration is also given to significant current issues such as equality of opportunity, multicultural education and the quest for educational excellence.

ED 306 Children's Literature

3 cr.

Cross-listed as FAML 306.

Prerequisites: Admission to the methods phase of teacher education.

Introduction to the literature available for children, the development of criteria for evaluating books, and a study of the literature program in the elementary schools.

ED 307 Integrating the Arts into the Elementary Curriculum

2 cr.

Prerequisites: Admission to the methods phase of teacher education. Satisfactory completion of MU 149A, AD 310, and PE 203, PE 381, or PE 383.

A capstone course for pre-professional elementary education teachers focusing on: 1.) utilizing creative dramatics and theatre as the medium for integrating the visual and performing arts in K-8 subjects such as science, history, language arts, mathematics, and geography; 2) demonstrating creative teaching and learning strategies from music, art, dance and theatre to motivate students and to enhance their study of school subjects; 3) developing lesson plans and their effective application for integrating the arts in field settings. This course includes a field assignment.

ED 310 Social Studies Methods and Materials for Elementary Teachers

2 cr.

Prerequisite: Admission to the methods phase of teacher education.

Survey of social studies curricula: their content, aims, and objectives in the elementary school (K-8). Includes the use of materials and unit method planning emphasizing basic generalizations and concepts. Basic principles of economics and the roles of economic institutions and business in American society are included. The application of good basic skills and attitudes to careers and the world of work in general are addressed.

ED 311 Language Arts Methods and Materials for Elementary Teachers

3 cr.

Prerequisite: Admission to the methods phase of teacher education.

Survey of theories, research, strategies and activities for incorporating the language arts throughout the elementary school curriculum. A predetermined number of practicum hours in the elementary school are required.

ED 312 Science Methods and Materials for Elementary Teachers

4 cr.

Prerequisites: Admission to the methods phase of teacher education and 12 credits of science.

A survey of science curricula and instructional methodology for the teaching of biological, earth, and physical sciences and technology in K-8 classrooms. Basic concepts of environmental education and teaching children the interdisciplinary nature of the sciences are stressed. Field experience is required.

ED 316 Elementary Reading Instruction I

3 cr.

Prerequisite: Admission to the methods phase of teacher education.

Study of the reading process and introduction to various techniques, with a number of observations of reading instruction in elementary classrooms.

ED 318 Elementary Reading Instruction II

3 cr.

Prerequisites: Admission to the methods phase of teacher education and ED 311 and ED 316.

An in-depth consideration and extension of the content provided in Reading Instruction I: examination of diagnostic techniques, introduction of reading subject matter materials, and a practicum experience.

ED 319 The Teaching of Reading for Secondary Teachers

3 cr.

Prerequisite: Admission to the methods phase of teacher education.

Methods the content area teacher can use to help students comprehend course materials more effectively, to determine reading needs of students and to adapt instruction to their needs. Field experience is required.

ED 327 Directed Study in Children's Literature

1 cr.

Corequisite: ED 306 or instructor permission.

Individual study of a significant topic in children’s literature defined jointly by student and instructor.

ED 349 Teaching for Diversity, Equity and Social Justice in the Secondary School Community

2 cr.

Prerequisites: Completion of Ed 201, Ed 301, ED 231 and admission to the methods phase of teacher education. Co-requisite:  Concurrent enrollment required in ED 319.

This course, which is combined with ED 319 and situated in a school setting, is a study of ethical principles and teaching methods common to all secondary school certification areas.  In particular, the course addresses issues of diversity, equity, and social justice within four major areas of knowledge:  (1) teaching strategies; (2) authentic performance assessment; (3) classroom management; and (4) uses of technology for a variety of curricula at the secondary level.

ED 360 Orientation to Special Education

4 cr.

Prerequisites: ED 230, ED 231 and PY 100.

Study of children with exceptionalities: etiology and characteristics of these individuals and the educational provisions that exist for their care, treatment, training, education, and habitation. Students are assigned to a 20 hour pre-teaching experience.

ED 361 Special Education and the General Classroom Teacher

2 cr.

Prerequisite: Admission to the methods phase of teacher education.

An introductory course covering the range of handicapping conditions, designed for the elementary or secondary teacher, or paraprofessional, who seeks to develop an awareness of the emotional, educational and social implications of handicaps and to formulate some practical applications of this knowledge when working with students with exceptionalities in the general classroom.

ED 400 Mental Impairments

4 cr.

Prerequisites: ED 360, junior standing or instructor permission.

Study of mental impairment, its historical background and etiology, characteristics of students with mental impairments and assistance in habilitation.

ED 401 Curriculum and Methods for Teaching Students with Mental Impairments

4 cr.

Prerequisites: ED 318, ED 400, junior standing or instructor permission.

Lesson construction and methodology for teaching students with moderate and mild mental impairments; includes the use of commercially and teacher-made materials. The teacher’s multiple professional roles are stressed.

ED 402 Teaching Life Skills to Students with Disabilities

2 cr.

Prerequisites: ED 360, junior standing or instructor permission.

Survey of national, state, and community resources in independent living, recreation and socialization opportunities for students with disabilities. In addition, students examine materials and curriculum for educating students with disabilities in social skills, free time activities, and human sexuality.

ED 403 Pre-Vocational Training for Students with Disabilities

2 cr.

Prerequisites: ED 360, ED 400, or ED 407, junior standing or instructor permission.

Study of prevocational curricula within the special education classroom including the development of transition objectives, vocational assessment, and potential vocational options following completion of prevocational training. Emphasis is placed on practical applications and programs as well as theoretical concepts.

ED 404 Assistive Technology for the Impaired

2 cr.

Prerequisites: ED 360, junior standing or instructor permission.

Development of ability to design, order and acquire modern technology and equipment for a variety of handicapping conditions. Emphases are on assisting independent living and enhancing communication, and use of assisting technology for teachers.

ED 405 Diagnosis and Assessment in Special Education

4 cr.

Prerequisites: ED 360, and ED 400, or ED 407, junior standing or instructor permission.

Study of diagnostic process in the assessment of intellectual capacity, educability, behavioral and emotional characteristics, and academic achievement. Students are required to administer, score, and interpret selected instruments and to compile a diagnostic write-up.

ED 406 Supervised Apprenticeship in Teaching Students with Mental Impairments in K-12 Settings

2 cr.

Graded: S/U.

Prerequisites: Completion of all required course work in the mentally impaired preparatory sequence, junior standing or instructor permission.

A four week full-day career related supervised experience. Students are assigned in school based programs for the mildly or moderately mentally impaired. Provides an opportunity to refine goals and polish skills; to translate abstract classroom theory to life application.

ED 407 Emotional Behavioral Impairment

4 cr.

Prerequisites: ED 360, PY 211, PY 203, junior standing or instructor permission.

Students will study the evolution of the field, investigate the biophysical, psychodynamic, behavioral, and ecological models of influence and develop a knowledge of both internalizing and externalizing disorders. Teacher roles will be explored as well as systems that impact in both negative and positive ways.

ED 408 Curriculum and Methods for Teaching Students with Emotional Impairments

4 cr.

Prerequisites: ED 407, junior standing or instructor permission.

Instruction and education structuring for elementary students. Students will obtain knowledge of teaching strategies, service units, and educational assessment unique to the needs of this impaired population. Various roles and strategies used by teachers will be studied as well as prescriptive parent planning.

ED 409 Supervised Apprenticeship in Teaching Students with Emotional Impairments in K-12 Settings

2 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: Completion of all required course work in the preparatory sequence for the emotionally behaviorally impaired program, junior standing or instructor permission.

A career related supervised experience of 144 hour duration during which the student is assigned to facilities for students who are emotionally/socially maladjusted. These may be school-based programs or treatment facilities with an educational service. This is an opportunity for the trainee to refine goals and to translate abstract theory to life application.

ED 410 Legal Rights and Services

2 cr.

Prerequisites: ED 360 and ED 400 or ED 407, junior standing or instructor permission.

This course is designed to introduce students to the legal system, terms and definitions, and the major impact of Section 504 and its interrelativeness with IDEA. It discusses eligibility, assessment, and due process. Abuse, negligence, discipline, and confidentiality as well as excursion and disclosure are studied. Federal and State of Michigan mandates which apply to special education are examined as they impact Early Childhood and Transition Programs as well as the school years.

ED 420 Teaching in the Elementary School

11 cr.

Graded S/U/P.

Prerequisites: See Eligibility for Student Teaching Placement and Teacher Selection and Retention Standards under the School of Education section.

The opportunity for a gradual, guided introduction of students in the elementary education curriculum into assuming responsibility for teaching, together with related activities, while they learn to translate theory into practice.

ED 421 Teaching in Elementary/Secondary Schools Communication Disorders

11 cr.

Graded S/U/P.

Prerequisites: See Teacher Selection and Retention Standards and Eligibility for Student Teaching Placement in the School of Education section of this bulletin.

The opportunity for a gradual, guided introduction of students in the communication disorders curriculum into assuming responsibility for teaching while they learn to translate theory into practice.

ED 423A  Teaching in the Elementary School

5 cr.

Graded S/U/P.

Prerequisites: See Teacher Selection and Retention Standards and Eligibility for Student Teaching Placement in the School of Education section of this bulletin.

The opportunity for a gradual, guided introduction of students in the mentally impaired or emotionally impaired education curriculum into assuming responsibility for teaching in a regular classroom while they learn to translate theory into practice.

ED 423B  Teaching Students with Mental Impairments in K-12 Schools

6 cr.

Graded S/U/P.

Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of ED 423A. See Teacher Selection and Retention Standards and Eligibility for Student Teaching Placement in the School of Education section of this bulletin.

The opportunity for a gradual, guided introduction of students in the mentally impaired education curriculum into assuming responsibility for teaching the educable and/or mentally impaired while they learn to translate theory into practice.

ED 423C Teaching Students with Emotional Impairments in K-12 Schools

6 cr.

Graded S/U/P.

Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of ED 423A.  See Teacher Selection and Retention Standards and Eligibility for Student Teaching Placement in the School of Education section of this bulletin.

The opportunity for a gradual, guided introduction of students in the emotionally impaired education program into assuming responsibility for teaching the emotionally impaired while they learn to translate theory into practice.

ED 424A Teaching Students with Mental Impairments in K-12 Schools

11 cr.

Graded S/U/P.

Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of ED 423A.  See Teacher Selection and Retention Standards and Eligibility for Student Teaching Placement in the School of Education section of this bulletin.

The opportunity for a gradual, guided introduction of students in the educable and/or trainable mentally impaired education program into assuming responsibility for teaching the educable and/or trainable mentally impaired while they learn to translate theory into practice.

ED 424B Teaching Students with Emotional Impairments in K-12 Schools

11 cr.

Graded S/U/P.

Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of ED 423A.  See Teacher Selection and Retention Standards and Eligibility for Student Teaching Placement in the School of Education section of this bulletin.

The opportunity for a gradual, guided introduction of students in the emotionally impaired education program into assuming responsibility for teaching the emotionally impaired while they learn to translate theory into practice.

ED 425 Teaching the K-12 Emotionally Impaired and the Educable and/or Trainable Mentally Impaired

11 cr.

Graded S/U/P.

Prerequisites: ED 406 and 409.

The opportunity for a gradual, guided introduction of students in the emotionally impaired and the educable and/or trainable mentally impaired education program into assuming responsibility for teaching the emotionally impaired and the educable and/or trainable mentally impaired while they learn to translate theory into practice.

ED 430 Teaching in the Secondary School

11 cr.

Graded S/U/P.

Prerequisites: See Eligibility for Student Teaching Placement and Teacher Selection and Retention Standards under the School of Education section.

The opportunity for a gradual, guided introduction of students in the secondary education curriculum into assuming responsibility for teaching, together with related activities, while they learn to translate theory into practice.

ED 440 Student Teaching (Elementary Education, Mentally Impaired, Speech Correction, Secondary Education)

3-6 cr.

Graded S/U/P.

Prerequisites: Department head permission. See also Eligibility for Student Teaching Placement and Teacher Selection and Retention Standards under the School of Education section of this bulletin.

The opportunity for a gradual, guided introduction of students into assuming responsibility for teaching. Variable credit for experienced teachers qualifying for additional certification.

ED 445 Practicum in the Middle School

2 cr.

Prerequisites: Student teaching experience.

A 60 clock hour experience in assisting, observing, directed teaching, and tutoring in skill development laboratories, and participating in team planning sessions in a middle school setting.

ED 450 Seminar in Teaching

1 cr.

Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in student teaching.

This course is designed to help the student teacher better understand and apply education principles and theories in full-time classroom teaching experience. It focuses on the roles, responsibilities, issues, and concerns of student teachers such as classroom management, instruction, assessment, multicultural education, human relations, employment, policy, and practices.

ED 460 The Middle School

3 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

Analysis of the philosophy, structure, curriculum, needs of students, and strategies of teaching of the middle school.

ED 462 Literature for Young Adults

3 cr.

Cross-listed as EN 462.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

A comprehensive study of books for young adults, designed for secondary school teachers. Needs and interests of adolescents are studied in conjunction with the application of selection principles to fiction and nonfiction of all types. Emphasis is placed on developmental reading for the accelerated, the average, and the reluctant student.

ED 483 Educational Media and Technology

2 cr.

Prerequisites: Passing score on the ED 483 prerequisite test or permission of instructor.

Focuses upon the education/instructional uses of audiovisual media including computers and related technologies.  Emphasis will be upon each type of hardware and software and its use as well as the subject matter areas that most easily integrate the technology.

ED 491 Workshops and Seminars in Education

1 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

Opportunities for the concentrated study of selected professional educational problems.

ED 495 Special Topics in Education

1-4 cr.

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

An opportunity for a group of upper division students to study problems in education that are not part of the regular offering.

ED 498 Directed Study in Education

2 cr.

Prerequisites: Advisor and instructor permission.

An opportunity for students to do independent study.

EN

(English Department)

All courses marked with V (variable credit) are available for an additional research credit; students must be registered for the three-credit course before signing up for the additional credit. This additional credit must be added separately.

EN 080 Reading and Writing

4 cr.

Does not apply toward an associate or baccalaureate degree but may apply towards some certificate and diploma programs.

An intensive, integrated review of reading and writing skills, study strategies, and vocabulary development. Designed to prepare students for EN 090, it differs from that course in providing more individualized instruction of various types.

EN 090 Basic Composition

4 cr.

Does not apply toward associate or baccalaureate degrees but may count toward some certificate and diploma programs. A grade of "C-" or better in EN 090 is required to enroll in EN 111.

A review of English grammar, punctuation, and spelling. Through individualized study and frequent practice, students learn to write Standard English sentences and to improve writing fluency. Mastery of these skills is required for enrollment in EN 111 and for success in other college courses.

EN 091 Review of Writing Skills

2 cr.

Prerequisites: EN 211 and demonstrated need (such as repeated attempts to pass the university's Writing Proficiency Examination). Hours do not apply toward any diploma, certificate, associate, or baccalaureate degree but meets the requirement for the writing proficiency exam.

A review of principles of effective writing that provides extensive practice, with special emphasis on those aspects of writing which each student finds most troublesome.

EN 101 Learning Skills Development

2 cr.

Does not count toward an English major or minor.

An emphasis on basic learning skills, especially reading, study techniques, note-taking, and writing. Students are helped to develop perceptions, attitudes, and self-concepts that lead to academic success.

EN 102 Personal Reading Improvement

2 cr.

Does not count toward an English major or minor.

A course to improve reading rate and comprehension, vocabulary, and critical reading skills.

EN 110 Good Books

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

An exploration of a variety of books from the past and present for the general reader. Emphasized are reading and discussing ideas from books with insights into human experiences.

EN 111 College Composition I

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of communication requirement.

Does not count toward an English major or minor.

Development of students’ abilities to read and discuss, and to write paragraphs and short essays about significant subjects. During the semester, each student writes a minimum of 5,000 words.

EN 112 Mythology

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Study of cultural myths, emphasizing Western (Greek, Roman, Norse) but including others such as Eastern (Chinese, Indian) and American Indian mythologies.

EN 169 Introduction to Literature and Film

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

The basic concepts of literature and film with emphasis on the interaction between the two. Literary works and films based on them are studied.

EN 200 Basic English Grammar and Usage for Teachers

2 cr.

A course to familiarize the student with the fundamentals of English grammar. The course is designed to prepare future English and language arts education students to teach these concepts, to prepare students with insufficient knowledge of basic traditional grammar for advanced English language study, or to improve or refresh any student’s knowledge of basic English grammar.

EN 205 Introduction to Professional Writing

1 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 211.

An orientation to areas of study in the field and to employment possibilities; includes discussions of  technical and professional writing, journalism, radio and TV writing, public relations and advertising, drama, poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Students will also receive a thorough grounding in word processing.

EN 206 Survey of Journalism

4 cr.

Theory and history of print journalism. Introduction to the fundamentals of news writing, reporting, and editing.

EN 207 Journalism: News and Reporting

4 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 206 or equivalent.

The mechanics of straight news reporting and writing. Frequent exercises and critiques.

EN 211 College Composition II

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of communication requirement.

Prerequisite: EN 111 with a grade of “C- ”or better, or equivalent. Education students must have a “C” or better in EN 111. Does not count toward the English major or minor.

Continued development of students’ abilities to read closely, to discuss critically, and to write carefully. Writers expand their stylistic range, awareness of form, and ability to deal with complex issues; further, they concentrate on developing a comfortable facility with at least one mode of writing. Longer papers are written with at least one paper using information from other sources. Five thousand words are spread over at least six or seven graded assignments. Sections are offered with the following subtitles:

EN 211A Writing and Literature

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of communication requirement.

Readings and writing assignments using literature as a source and stimulus for composition. Expository and narrative writing are emphasized.

EN 211B Narrative and Descriptive Writing

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of communication requirement.

Readings and writing assignments investigating perception, the ordering of experiences and insights, and methods of expression. Descriptive and narrative writing are emphasized.

EN 211D Technical and Report Writing

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of communication requirement.

Readings and writing assignments treating subjects appropriate for students in scientific, technical, or business fields. Formal expository writing and the preparation of reports are emphasized.

EN 211E Critical Thinking and Writing

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of communication requirement.

Reading and writing assignments focus on critical thinking, articulation of ideas, analysis of audience, and writing an effective argument using library resources to document ideas. Argumentative and critical techniques are emphasized.

EN 215 Introduction to Creative Writing

4 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 211 or instructor permission.

An introduction to the craft of writing poetry, fiction, and drama/script writing, emphasizing the analysis of models and class discussion of student work.

EN 220  Introduction to Shakespeare

4 credits

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Prerequisite:  EN 111.

Introduction to the comedies, tragedies, romances, and sonnets of Shakespeare.

EN 250 Images of Women

4 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 111.

Examination of literatures of different periods and cultures to identify female images, archetypes, and stereotypes; emphasis is on their connections to contemporary popular culture.

EN 260 Popular Culture

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Prerequisite: EN 111.

The arts and artifacts of popular culture from generic and thematic perspectives, emphasizing the spoken and written word, films, radio, and television; the application of critical methods to these arts.

EN 265 Introduction to Folklore

4 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 111.

The genres and themes of American folklore, including folk speech, proverbs, legends, poetry, and ballads. Includes samples of folk narrative dealing with customs, traditions, and work experience.

EN 269 Advanced Study of Literature and Film

4 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 111.

Examination of literature and film through one or more of the following approaches: genres, films of one author’s works, or books and movies of one historical period.

EN 280 Patterns and Continuity of the Literary Past I

1 cr.

Part one of a series of multimedia presentations followed by small group discussions of examples to present an overview of the historical contexts of literature. Examples and discussion will note both the advantages and the difficulties of determining the historical context of literature and note the continuing influences of earlier traditions on current literature.

EN 281 Patterns and Continuity of the Literary Past II

1 cr.

Part two of a series of multimedia presentations followed by small group discussions of examples to present an overview of the historical contexts of literature. Examples and discussion will note both the advantages and the difficulties of determining the historical context of literature, and note the continuing influences of earlier traditions on current literature.

EN 282 Introduction to Literature

4 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 111.

The practice of analysis and interpretation of literature. This first course for English majors introduces students to important terms and concepts relevant to literary study, and improves students’ abilities to read and interpret works of fiction, poetry, and drama.

EN 283 Survey of British Literature I

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Prerequisite: EN 111.

British literature from before the Middle Ages to the eighteenth century, concentrating on major figures and works and on the development of modern issues in literature.

EN 284 Survey of British Literature II

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Prerequisite: EN 111.

A survey of British literature from the Romantic period to the mid-twentieth century, concentrating on major figures and works and on the development of modern issues in literature.

EN 295 Special Topics

1-4 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 111; may be taken more than once with different topics.

Investigation of a significant topic, theme, or group of works. Content varies.

EN 298 College Composition Directed Study

1-2 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of communication requirement.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to transfer students; less than six transfer credits earned toward the liberal studies program foundations of communication requirement; permission of the director of foundations of communication.  Offered every semester; may not be taken more than once.

Independent undergraduate writing, planned by the student in consultation with the instructor, to complete credit for either EN 111 or EN 211.

EN 300 Creative Writing: Fiction

4 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 111, EN 215 or instructor permission.

The art of writing fiction, emphasizing class discussion of student work.

EN 301 Creative Writing: Poetry

4 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 111, EN 215 or instructor permission.

The art of writing poetry, emphasizing individual conferences and class discussion of student work.

EN 302 Nonfiction Writing

4 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 211.

The craft of writing nonfiction, emphasizing the analysis of models and class discussion of student work.

EN 303 Technical and Professional Writing

4 cr.

Prerequisites: EN 211 and junior standing.

Study and practice in the principles of writing for organizations in business, government, and industry. Emphasizes the need for audience analysis, careful document design, and appropriate style in correspondence, proposals, reports, and manuals.

EN 305 Tutoring Writing

2 cr.

Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

A presentation of theoretical knowledge and practical experience to enable Writing Center tutors to help other students with composition. The process of writing and methods of conferencing about writing are studied.

EN 306 Journalism Editing and Design

4 cr.

Prerequisites: EN 211 and EN 207.

Theory and practice of copy and photo editing, headline writing, layout and design.

EN 307 Practicum

2 cr.

May be repeated twice.

Prerequisites: EN 211 and EN 207.

Closely supervised service as a reporter or editor for the student newspaper or other local medium.

EN 309 The Teaching of Writing

4 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 211.

Study of the principles of teaching writing appropriate for teachers in all grade levels and subject areas. Emphasis on the process and product of writing and effective strategies for teaching it, achieved through varied and frequent writing assignments.

EN 310 Literature and the Bible

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Prerequisites: EN 211 and sophomore standing.

Ancient and modern literature inspired and influenced by the Bible; the Bible is studied in literature and as literature.

EN 311 World Literature in English

4 cr.

Cross listed with LG 311.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Satisfies the world cultures requirement when offered as EN 311Z.

Prerequisites: EN 211 and sophomore standing.

A survey of translated works of literature from one country, stressing historical development and comparative analysis.

VEN 312 Medieval British Literature

3-4 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 211.

The study of the literature of England from the beginnings to about 1485.

EN 314 Traditional Oral Literatures: Selected Native American Cultures

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Satisfies the world cultures requirement.

Prerequisites: EN 211 and sophomore standing.

Provides a discussion of Native American traditional teaching stories from several cultures, with additional emphasis on the traditions of the Eastern Woodlands and Great Lakes Anishinabe people, and offers useful background for studies in modern literature written by Native Americans. The course presents poetry, stories and songs that have been transcribed and/or translated from oral tradition, as well as guest teachings by elders and spiritual leaders of the Great Lakes Ojibwa communities, and by elders of other Native cultures when feasible.

EN 315 Native American Literature: Twentieth Century

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Satisfies the world cultures requirement.

Prerequisites: EN 211 and sophomore standing.

A survey of twentieth-century writing by native peoples of the Americas. North American writers are the primary focus; however, occasionally South American native writers whose works are translated into English may be included or may be the focus. The course stresses analysis of how the writers’ native heritage informs the form and content of the works.

EN 316 Native American Novels and Poetry

4 cr.

Satisfies world cultures requirement.

A student who has taken either EN 315 or EN 311Z Native Canadian Literature may take either EN 316 or EN 317 but not both. A student who has taken both EN 315 and EN 311Z Native Canadian Literature is not eligible for either.

Prerequisites: En 211 and sophomore standing.

A survey of novels and poetry in English by indigenous writers of North America. The primary focus of the course will be on modern and contemporary novels and poems by Canadian and US authors with occasional works by earlier writers and/or a few traditional stories and songs translated into English. The course stresses analysis of how the writers' indigenous heritage informs the form and content of the works and how such literature has developed.

EN 317 Native American Drama, Non-fiction and Short Stories

4 cr.

Satisfies world cultures requirement.

Prerequisites: EN 211 and sophomore standing.

A survey of drama, non-fiction, and short stories in English written by indigenous peoples of North America. The primary focus of the course will be on modern and contemporary works by Canadian and US authors with an occasional work by an earlier writer and/or a few traditional works translated into English. The course stresses analysis of how the writers' indigenous heritage informs the form and content of the works and how such writings have developed. A student who has taken either EN 315 or EN 311Z Native Canadian Literature may take EN 316 or EN 317 but not both. A student who has taken both EN 315 and EN 311Z Native Canadian Literature is not eligible for either.

VEN 320 Renaissance British Literature

3-4 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 211.

Several representative authors, trends, or genres prominent between 1495 and 1660, exclusive of Shakespeare or Milton.

VEN 322 Restoration Eighteenth Century British Literature

3-4 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 211.

The rise and development of neo-classical literature between 1660 and 1785 and the beginnings of romanticism.

VEN 330 British Romantic Literature

3-4 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 211.

The important romantic writers in England from 1798 to 1832, including Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats.

VEN 340 Victorian Literature

3-4 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 211.

The important Victorian writers between 1820 and 1900, including Tennyson, Browning, Dickens, and Arnold.

EN 350 Methods and Materials in Teaching English Education

4 cr.

May not be applied toward a non-teaching major or any minor in English.

Prerequisite: Admission to the methods phase of teacher education and instructor permission.

Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ED 349.

Introduction to recent methods and materials to motivate high school students. Presents phases of language, literature, and composition in a classroom situation. Text readings are balanced with professional research tailored to individual interests.

VEN 360 Modern British Literature

3-4 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 211.

British fiction and poetry after 1900, with emphasis on major figures such as Conrad, Joyce, Lawrence, Yeats, and Auden.

VEN 361 Studies in Genre, Poetry

3-4 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 282.

A study of poetry meant to acquaint students with the broad variety of verbal activities in the genre. The course will include an examination of lyric, dramatic and narrative forms. Lyric poems may include hymns, meditations, songs, elegies, odes, and sonnets, as well as contemporary forms of the lyric. Dramatic forms may include monologues, plays, soliloquies and dialogues. Narrative forms may include epic, romance, ballad and satire, as well as contemporary narrative forms. Didactic poetry may fall under either narrative or lyric.

VEN 362 Studies in Genre, Narrative

3-4 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 282.

The course in narrative studies the characteristics that define this varied genre in history. The class provides students with a complex historical knowledge of narrative from the epic to the novel with emphases on the novel, the short story, and theories of narrative, but with some consideration of narrative forms from the epic to the romance.

VEN 363 Studies in Genre, Drama

3-4 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 282.

A study of drama as genre from Greek tragedy to modern drama. The course may be organized according to a history of drama, types of drama, or major themes.

VEN 364 Studies in Genre, Film

3-4 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 282.

An examination of the ways in which film communicates story and experience, emphasizing structure, narrative techniques, and other elements of the cinematic art.

EN 366 Applied Literary Theory

4 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 211.

Examination of contemporary literary theories, emphasizing their ways of redefining literature and the study of literature.  It also explores the application of theory to literary texts.

VEN 369 Literary Criticism and Film

3-4 cr.

Prerequisites: EN 111; EN 169 or EN 269, or instructor permission.

An application of contemporary techniques of literary analysis and criticism to selected films grouped by director or theme.

EN 370 American Literature I: Columbus to the American Revolution (1492-1800)

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Prerequisites: EN 211 and sophomore standing.

Considers issues of colonialism (travel literature and the literature of conquest) and the conflicts between indigenous populations and the European ideas that influenced the literatures of colonial life.  The survey ends with a consideration of the movement from colony to nation.

EN 371 American Literature II: Emergent National Voices (1800-1865)

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Prerequisites: EN 211 and sophomore standing.

Considers the movement toward inventing a “National Voice.” The course will discuss the innovations of the American Literary Renaissance and transcendentalism, the development of slave narratives, the rise of the sentimental novel and the literature of the Civil War period.

EN 372 American Literature III: Realism, Naturalism, to WWI (1865-1930)

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Prerequisites: EN 211 and sophomore standing.

Considers the literature that took shape in the wake of the Civil War up through WWI. The course will focus on literary movements at the turn of the century such as regionalism, realism and naturalism, as well as the impact of World War I upon American writing and the creative output of the Harlem Renaissance.

EN 373 American Literature IV: Contemporary Vistas (1930-Present)

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Prerequisites: EN 211 and sophomore standing.

The final segment of the American survey will begin with the literature of modernism and World War II and conclude with a consideration of American postmodernism. The course will cover definitive movements such as imagism, the Beats, literature of the 60’s and Vietnam, new journalism, minimalism and literature integral to the women’s movement.

EN 375 Diverse Traditions in American Literature

4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Satisfies the world cultures requirement when offered as EN 375Z.

Prerequisites: EN 211 and sophomore standing.

This is a variable content survey course that deals with the writings of minority populations in the U.S. The class will detail the specific historical context of each group and examine their distinct literary contributions. Possible offerings: African American, Asian American, Arab American, Latino American, Jewish American, etc.

VEN 380 Contemporary Literature

3-4 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 211.

Selected British and American literature after 1945, including figures such as Updike, Roth, Lowell, and Fowles.

VEN 381 Contemporary Dramatic Literature

3-4 cr.

Prerequisite: EN 211.

An examination of drama as literature, concentrating on major developments in Europe and America after 1945 and on works by authors such as Albee, Beckett, Pinter, Lonesco, and Shepherd.

EN 385 Theatre in Perspective: The Stratford Festival Stage

3 cr.

Cross-listed with TH 385.

Satisfies the foundations of visual and performing arts requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Prerequisites: EN 211 or instructor’s permission.

This summer session course offers an interdisciplinary approach to four or five plays that will be performed at the Stratford Theatre Festival in Stratford, Ontario.  Students who register for EN 385/TH 385 will be encouraged to register at the same time for TH 493, Field Studies, so that they will also be able to view these same plays in performance in Stratford.

EN 400 Narrative Writing Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: EN 211, EN 300, junior standing or instructor permission.

The study of narrative theory, conventions, and forms, and the further pursuit of excellence in writing narratives.

EN 401 Poetry Writing Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: EN 211, EN 301, junior standing or instructor permission.

The study of poetic theory, conventions, and forms, and the pursuit of excellence in writing poetry.

EN 402 Nonfiction Writing Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: EN 302 or equivalent, junior standing or instructor permission.

The study of nonfiction theory, conventions, and forms, and the further pursuit of excellence in writing nonfiction.

EN 403 Drama and Script Writing Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: EN 211, EN 300 or EN 301, junior standing or instructor permission.

The study of drama and script theory, conventions, and forms, and the pursuit of excellence in writing these forms.

EN 404 The English Language

4 cr.

Prerequisites: EN 211, junior standing or instructor permission.

An overview of the history and present structure of the English language, with emphasis on traditional grammar and other modern theories of linguistic analysis; the definition and status of language; the sounds, inflections, and syntax of modern English; the historical development of grammatical signals; usage, dialect geography; and the position of English among world languages.

EN 405 Technical Writing Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: EN 211, EN 303, junior standing or instructor permission.

The study of technical communication theory, conventions and forms, and the further pursuit of excellence in writing technical documents.

EN 406 Public Affairs Reporting

4 cr.

Prerequisites: EN 211, EN 207, junior standing or instructor permission.

An advanced course in researching and reporting the news, emphasizing access to information and coverage of public meetings.

VEN 411 Topics in World Literature

3-4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Satisfies the world cultures requirement when offered as EN 411Z.

Does not satisfy the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Prerequisites: EN 211, junior standing or instructor permission.

A variable-format course with a general focus on critical reading and comparative analysis that can include team teaching, guest units, and interdisciplinary approaches to intertextual study on a global level.  Special topics will introduce single national or transnational groupings of texts, organized around such principles as genre, theme, canonicity, identity, theory, and intellectual movements.

VEN 412 Chaucer

3-4 cr.

Prerequisites: EN 211, junior standing or instructor permission.

Critical reading, in relation to medieval literary and social background, of Canterbury Tales and other works in the original language.

VEN 420 Shakespeare

3-4 cr.

Prerequisites: EN 211, junior standing or instructor permission. Intended for English majors and minors.

The poetry and plays.

VEN 422 Milton

3-4 cr.

Prerequisites: EN 211, junior standing or instructor permission.

The poetry and several of the major prose works.

VEN 430 Major Authors

3-4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Prerequisites: EN 211, junior standing or instructor permission.

One author or a limited number of British and American authors. Author(s) to be announced in advance.

VEN 440 Topics in Gender in Literature

3-4 cr.

Prerequisites: EN 211, plus two upper division courses in literature, junior standing or instructor permission.

A study of the role and significance of gender in literature, concentrating on a particular genre and/or period. Generally, the emphasis will be on women writers and/or the portrayal of gender.

VEN 462 Literature for Young Adults

3-4 cr.

Prerequisites: EN 211, junior standing or instructor permission.

Cross-listed as ED 462.

A comprehensive study of books for young adults, designed for secondary school teachers. Needs and interests of adolescents are studied in conjunction with the application of selection principles to fiction and nonfiction of all types. Emphasis is placed on developmental reading for the accelerated, the average, and the reluctant student.

VEN 490 Seminar

3-4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Prerequisites: EN 211, junior standing and instructor permission. Limited to 20 students. A strong background in literature is recommended.

The subject, an analysis of a literary genre or a study of literary criticism, is announced in advance.

EN 491 Internship

2-6 cr.

May be taken more than once for up to six credits.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission. Screening by department committee.

Supervised practical work for selected students in newspaper, public relations, or other field.

EN 493 Seminar: Issues in Literature

4 cr.

Prerequisites: EN 282 plus at least 20 additional hours toward the major, junior standing or instructor permission.

Designed as a capstone course to allow students to draw together their experiences with literature and set them in context. Each section will have a particular focus selected by the instructor, but will also include consideration of current issues in literary studies such as debates over the selection of works to be studied in literature courses, multiculturalism and the interactions of literature and culture, specific sub-issues like pornography, censorship, and the political correctness, and the future of literary forms including film, hypermedia, virtual reality and the interactive novel. The course will include a review of each student’s writing portfolio.

EN 495 Special Topics

1-4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Prerequisites: EN 211, junior standing and instructor permission.

Authors’ works or genres not otherwise emphasized in undergraduate courses.

EN 495W Special Topics Writing

1-4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Prerequisites: EN 211, junior standing and instructor permission.

Special writing subjects and methods not otherwise emphasized in undergraduate courses.

EN 496 Special Topics

1-4 cr.

Graded S/U.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Prerequisites: EN 211, junior standing and instructor permission.

Authors’ works or genres not otherwise emphasized in undergraduate courses.

EN 498 Directed Study

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: EN 211, junior standing and department head permission; maximum of four credits.

Independent study by qualified undergraduates in an area defined by the student and the instructor.

ENV

(Individually Created Programs)

ENV 101 Introduction to Environmental Science

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of natural sciences/mathematics requirement.

Does not meet the laboratory course graduation requirement.

Introduction to the basic scientific principles and concepts surrounding Environmental Science. Major components of the natural environment including climate, soils, geologic, and hydrologic processes are described. Important ecological concepts concerning aquatic and terrestrial systems are discussed in relation to air, water, and soil resources. Human influences to these natural systems and processes are evaluated in terms of energy and natural resources management, major pollution issues, research and assessment techniques, and environmental sustainability.

ESPR

(Communication and Performance Studies Department)

ESPR 160 Introduction to Entertainment and Sports Promotion

4 cr.

An introduction to the work of the communication practitioner in the entertainment and sports industry. Course topics include: the public relations process as it exists in entertainment and sports; the role of entertainment and sports in American society as it is created by the communication practitioner; career options in entertainment and sports and the four models of public relations as found in entertainment and sports. Students will begin work on their professional portfolios by researching the career area of their choice, determining what expectations prospective employers have and planning their academic work. Emphasis is on developing professional and ethical standards and understanding the role of the communication practitioner in entertainment and sports publicity and promotional activities.

ESPR 260 Fundamentals of Entertainment and Sports Promotion

4 cr.

Prerequisites: Completion of ESPR 160 and EN 111 with a grade of "C" or higher.

Instruction in the basic principles of research necessary to doing publicity and promotion. Emphasis is placed on learning about data bases relevant to communication practices in entertainment and sports. Students are taught the systematic preparation of background information and materials to facilitate conceptual thinking and creative problem solving. The use of primary and secondary research techniques in discovering necessary information about the five publics (the participant, the spectator, the corporate sponsor, the volunteer and the affinity consumer) critical to communication practice are covered.

ESPR 295 Special Topics in Entertainment and Sports Promotion

2-4 cr.

May be repeated for credit if topic varies.

Prerequisites: ESPR 160 or Instructor permission.

Study of a particular topic area or problem in entertainment and sports promotion that expands on a topic from ESPR 160 or ESPR 260.

ESPR 298 Directed Study in Entertainment and Sports Promotion

1-4 cr.

May be repeated for up to eight credits.

Prerequisites: ESPR 160 and instructor and department head permission. The student must be a major or minor in the ESPR curriculum.

Independent study in an area of Entertainment and Sports Promotion defined by student and instructor.

ESPR 360 Publicity Techniques for Entertainment and Sports Promotion

4 cr.

Prerequisites: Completion of ESPR 260 and EN 211E (or another EN 211 plus SP 200 Argumentation) with a grade of "C" or better, successful completion of the NMU writing exam. Students must be of sophomore standing or higher.

A focus on the basic techniques of publicity and the design of messages used in promoting entertainment and sports activities and events. This course emphasizes writing and planning skills. Basic concepts and fundamental elements from ESPR 160 and ESPR 260 are operationalized as communication practice in this course. Students need to have completed the Writing component of the liberal studies to succeed in this course.

ESPR 431 Promotional Campaigns

4 cr.

Cross listed with PR 431.

Prerequisites: Completion of ESPR 360 and the SP theory course (SP 300, SP 310, or SP 401) requirement with a grade of "C" or better, junior standing.

This is the capstone course in the entertainment and sports promotion major and minor program. Students put together all that they have learned in major course work. Students will be assigned a client from entertainment or sports, depending on their interests, and asked to research the client's promotional needs and design an appropriate campaign. Portfolio review will be done.

ESPR 463 Field Studies in Entertainment and Sports Promotion

1-2 cr.

Prerequisites: Must be a major or minor in entertainment and sports promotion and junior standing or higher.

A site study of an entertainment or sports event that will include travel to the venue and related lecture-discussion of the activity.

ESPR 491 Practicum in Entertainment and Sports Promotion

1-8 cr.

Graded S/U

Prerequisites: ESPR 360 and instructor and department head permission. The student must be a major or minor in the ESPR curriculum.

Projects in entertainment and sports under the supervision of a faculty member and a designated site supervisor.

ESPR 492 Internship in Entertainment and Sports Promotion

1-8 cr.

Graded S/U

Prerequisites: ESPR 360, instructor and department head permission and a minimum GPA of 2.75. The student must be a major or minor in the ESPR curriculum.

Practical, applied experience involving placement in a job situation.

ESPR 495 Special Topics in Entertainment and Sports Promotion

2-4 cr.

May be repeated if topic varies.

Prerequisites: ESPR 260 or Instructor permission.

Study of a particular topic area or problem in entertainment and sports promotion that expands on a topic from the ESPR Curriculum.

ESPR 498 Directed Studies in Entertainment and Sports Promotion

1-4 cr.

May be repeated for up to 8 credits.

Prerequisites: ESPR 260 and instructor and department head permission. The student must be a major or minor in the ESPR curriculum.

Independent study in an area of entertainment and sports promotion defined by student and instructor.

ET

(Engineering Technology Department)

ET 100 Fundamentals of Electricity

2 cr. (1-0-2)

This course is taught during the first seven weeks of the semester.

Prerequisites: MA 090 or higher mathematics course.

The fundamentals of DC, series circuits, parallel circuits, compound circuits, and magnetism are explored. Other topics include Ohm’s Law, the Power Formula, and Kirchoff’s Laws. Emphasis is placed on using standard methods of circuit analysis and basic electrical measuring equipment.

ET 101 Principles of Electrical Wiring

2 cr. (1-0-2)

This course is taught during the second seven weeks of the semester.

Prerequisites: ET 100 or instructor permission.

A study of basic wiring practices and techniques as they apply to residential dwellings and commercial buildings. Emphasis will be placed on wiring practices, the essentials of electrical code requirements, electrical principles of automotive systems, and the principles of electric motors.

ET 110 Introduction to Electricity

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Prerequisites:  MA 100 or higher mathematics course.

The fundamentals of DC, AC, series circuits, parallel circuits, compound circuits, inductance, capacitance, and magnetism are explored. Emphasis is placed on using standard methods of circuit analysis and basic test equipment.

ET 112 DC Circuit Analysis

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Prerequisites:  MA 100 or math placement equivalency.

An introduction to electricity and electronics through applied DC circuit theory. Course content will include topics on Ohms Law, Kirchhoff's Law, and Power Laws as well as discrete electronic components and schematic diagrams. Theory to be reinforced by practical laboratory experimentation emphasizing the use of the volt-ohmmeter (VOM) and the digital multimeter (DMM).

ET 113 AC Circuit Analysis

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Prerequisites:  MA 104, ET 112

An introduction to AC electricity and electronics through applied circuit theory. Course content will include topics on basic AC circuit components, circuit analysis, transformers, pulse and frequency response and polyphase circuits. Theory to be reinforced by practical laboratory  experimentation emphasizing the use of the volt-ohmmeter (VOM) and the  digital multimeter (DMM) and the oscilloscope.

ET 201 Visual Programming for Technicians

4 cr.

Prerequisite: ET 113.

The course introduces the development of industrial and technical software applications with Rapid Application Development (RAD) tools currently used in industry. Students will learn graphical user interface (GUI) concepts, program flow control, and problem solving skills.

ET 210 Discrete Semiconductors

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Prerequisite: ET 113.

Analysis of basic discrete semiconductor devices. Course work and laboratory activities are based on the study of semiconductor diodes, zener diodes, regulators, bipolar transistors, JFET transistors and the application of these devices in power supplies and amplifiers.

ET 211 Digital Electronics

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Prerequisite: ET 210.

Comprehensive coverage of digital integrated circuits including the TTL and CMOS families. Topics include logic gates, decoders, drivers, counters, multiplexers, and RAM memories.

ET 212 Advanced Linear Circuits

3 cr. (2-0-2)

Prerequisite: ET 210.

The fundamentals of active linear monolithic circuits are explored. Emphasis is placed on operational amplifiers and their application as comparators, active filters, and amplifiers. Additional topics include feedback circuits, on/off controls, mathematical operations and instrumentation devices.

ET 250 Industrial Electrical Machinery

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Prerequisites: ET 110 or ET 112.

A study of the principles of operation, applications, and selection of motors, generators, and transformers used in industry today.

ET 252 Industrial Motor Controls

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Prerequisites: ET 110 or ET 112.

Industrial power devices and associated control circuits, including starters, contactors, limit switches, and various types of electric motors. Emphasis is placed on motor control line diagrams as well as wiring diagrams including line voltage control.

ET 281 Computer Systems Servicing

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Study of the techniques and procedures used to service microcomputer systems. Topics covered include troubleshooting techniques, power supplies, option cards, keyboards, disk drives, monitors, and printers.

ET 282 Computer Software Systems

2 cr. (1-0-2)

Thorough coverage of the software maintenance techniques used with microcomputers. Emphasis is placed on file recovery, software modifications, formatting procedures and the installation of various software packages.

ET 283 A+Computer Technician Certification Review

2 cr. (2-0-0)

Prerequisites: ET 281 and ET 282.

A review of the principals and procedures of computer maintenance with the focus on readying the student for the A+Computer Certification Examination.

ET 295 Special Topics in Electronics

1-4 cr.

Prerequisite: Advisor permission.

Specialized work not covered in other courses.

ET 298 Directed Study and Research

1-4 cr.

Prerequisite: Department permission.

Selection of problem in area of emphasis, specialized instruction and experiences to reinforce technical skill and knowledge. Written reports of work are required.

ET 301 Computers in Industry

3 cr. (2-0-2)

Prerequisite: ET 201.

Programming class stressing industrial and technical applications of computers. Emphasis is placed on developing programs using the "C" language with applications related to computer interfacing (I/O), data manipulation, and control of external hardware.

ET 311 Applied Programmable Controllers

2 cr. (1-0-2)

Prerequisite: ET 252.

Practical applications of programmable controllers in motor control and industrial automation situations. Emphasis is placed on applying a commercial grade programmable controller involving I/O applications as well as the use of programming instructions. Applications include A/D, timers, and events counters.

ET 320 Advanced Digital Electronics

3 cr. (3-0-0)

Prerequisite: ET 211.

This course is a continuation of ET 211 Digital Electronics. This new course covers memory, programmable logic, hardware implementation of arithmetic algorithms, simulation of digital systems, and computer architecture.

ET 360 Process Control Systems

3 cr. (2-0-2)

Prerequisite: ET 212.

An introduction to Process Control focusing on industrial instrumentation and processes.  Course content will include basic process control theory, signal conditioning, sensor, and control loop characteristics.  Theory to be reinforced by lab work using actual industrial instrumentation and sensors.

ET 410 Interfacing and Data Acquisition Techniques

3 cr. (2-0-2)

Prerequisites: ET 211, ET 301, junior standing or instructor permission.

A hardware-software oriented course involving use of the microcomputer as an I/O and data gathering device using a “high level language’ for the purpose of process and machine control. Emphasis is placed on various digital sensors and the use of A/D and D/A converters and real-time clocks as integral parts of the control system.

ET 420 Microcontroller Applications

3 cr. (2-0-2)

Prerequisites: ET 301, ET 320, junior standing or instructor permission.

Analysis of the PIC16CXX families of microcontroller products along with the application of 8 bit processors in typical industrial applications involving process control. Emphasis is also placed on a wide range of development tools available for these microcontroller devices.

ET 430 Senior Project

2 cr.

Prerequisites: ET 410,  ET 420, junior standing or instructor permission.

A problem solving and applications course that focuses on the use of electronic systems including microcontrollers, personal computers, PLC's, or other electronic systems to control or otherwise interface between mechanisms and circuitry. The courses will culminate in an oral senior project demonstration with supporting written documentation.

ET 483 Studies in Business and Industry

4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Cooperative work experience to provide up-to-date technical skills in the area of specialization; includes work experience with business and industrial operations, services and materials, processes and techniques.

ET 495 Special Topics in Electronics

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Specialized work not covered in other courses.

ET 498 Directed Study and Research

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Selection of problem in area of emphasis; specialized instruction and experiences to reinforce technical skill and knowledge. Written reports of work are required.

FIN

(College of Business–Finance)

FIN 224 Personal Financial Management

4 cr.

This course is not intended for finance majors.

Development of practical solutions for routine problems faced in personal financial affairs. Major topics to be discussed are tax return preparation, tax planning, insurance, property, consumer credit, financial institutions, investing, and other current topics.

FIN 351 Management of Financial Resources

3 cr.

Prerequisites: ACT 240 or approval of instructor.

Financial management of corporations. Management of capital sources of short and intermediate funds; factors determining the capital structure; sources of long-term capital; the securities market; and financing growth and development. Emphasis on the analysis and interpretation of financial accounting measurements.

FIN 352 Financial Management

4 cr.

Prerequisite: FIN 351.

Study of financial management theories and their applications to complex corporate financial problems. By means of case studies, special emphasis is given to analysis and decision making about all major problems in financial management.

FIN 354 Money and Capital Markets

4 cr.

Analysis of money market instruments in conjunction with monetary policy influences. The markets and their role in channeling liquid and investment funds to the private and public sectors. The roles of major financial institutions (pension funds, insurance companies, banks) as both suppliers and users of market capital.

FIN 355 Insurance Planning

3 cr.

An introduction to the principles of insurance planning including the identification of risk exposures, property and liability analysis, life insurance policy analysis, health insurance policy analysis, social insurance, employee insurance benefits, insurance regulation and taxation.  Discussion and analysis will include evaluation techniques and insurance planning concepts from contract selection to cost benefit analysis.

FIN 413 New Venture Finance:  Capital Formation and Legal Issues

3 cr.

Prerequisites: ACT 325, junior standing or instructor permission.

Summarizes and ties together the materials presented in the entrepreneurship core of classes. Extends the student's knowledge in this area through the incorporation of cases based on creating and managing new business ventures; this includes various methods of raising capital for new and growing ventures and a thorough examination of the legal issues involved in such an undertaking.

FIN 420 Financial Statement Analysis

3 cr.

Prerequisites: ACT 240, junior standing or instructor permission.

An intensive study of the interpretation and analysis of a financial statement. Emphasis is placed on analyzing financial data for investment, credit and managerial decisions.

FIN 424 Personal Financial Planning

3 cr.

Prerequisites: ACT 240, ACT 321, FIN 462, FIN 355, FIN 450, FIN 460, and junior standing or instructor permission.

Intensive study of personal financial affairs and planning. The planning process is emphasized while developing an in-depth understanding of tax planning, retirement, planning, consumer credit and sources of financing, risk and insurance planning, and investment analysis and instruments.

FIN 450 Estate Planning

3 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

A study of various estate planning principles and techniques as they relate to the financial planning process. Included in this course is the study of methods of property transfer, estate planning documentation, principles of estate, gift and trust taxation, features and classification of trusts, the use of life insurance in the estate planning process, and the tools and techniques for general estate planning.

FIN 458 International Financial Management

3 cr.

Prerequisites: FIN 351 and junior standing or instructor permission.

Financial management of multinational firms. Management of international sources of funds; dealing with international exchange; international expansion and investment.

FIN 460 Employee Benefits and Retirement Planning

3 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

A working knowledge of employee benefits and retirement planning tools. Topics covered include: qualified plan characteristics, deferred saving plans, plan distributions and options, group insurance benefits, and retirement needs analysis. The financial planning process is emphasized along with cases, discussions and lectures.

FIN 461 Management of Financial Institutions

3 cr.

Prerequisites: FIN 351 and junior standing or instructor permission. The prerequisites may be waived for students whose work experience or background enables them to understand the basic objectives and operation of the monetary system.

Analysis of the major policy areas of financial institutions including commercial banks, thrifts, insurance companies and pension funds. Liquidity business and credit, asset and liability management and capital structure are discussed in relation to profit objectives and the regulatory and monetary policy environment. Holding companies, financial institution competition and current issues are discussed.

FIN 462 Investment Analysis

4 cr.

Prerequisites: FIN 351,  junior standing or instructor permission.

Types of investment securities; bonds, stock, valuation of common stocks, valuation and grading of bonds and preferred stocks; risks associated with each form of investment. Policies in construction and management of investment portfolio. Current trends and timing of investments.

FIN 463 Portfolio Management

3 cr.

Prerequisites: FIN 462,  junior standing or instructor permission.

A theoretical and empirical discussion of the effect of information and investor preference on investment decisions.

FIN 491 Internship in Finance

1-4 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Professional experience for qualified accounting and finance students. Working relationships will be established with accounting firms and other business organizations. Students are required to write a paper, and will be evaluated by their faculty supervisor in consultation with the employer. Generally, a minimum of 40 hours of internship will be required for each credit hour; however, most students will intern most of a summer or semester and earn four credit hours. Credit hours are over and above any existing catalog requirements for the finance degree.

FIN 495 Variable Topics in Finance

1-4 cr.

May be taken more than once for credit.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Variable topics of current interest.

FIN 498 Directed Study in Finance

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Independent study of some special problem in accounting or finance under the guidance of a faculty member. This study is limited to students with superior grade point averages.

FR

(Modern Languages and Literatures Department)

FR 101 Elementary French I

4 cr.

Satisfies the formal communication studies requirement.

FR 101 is an introduction to the French language and cultures of the people who speak it.  Students learn rudimentary “survival” skills such as social pleasantries, shopping, exchanging money, eating in restaurants, talking about family, school and weather.

FR 102 Elementary French II

4 cr.

Satisfies the formal communication studies requirement.

Prerequisites: FR 101 or one year of high school French.

FR 102 is a continuation of FR 101. Students add to their proficiency in matters such as those related to health, free time, employment, travel, and talking about the past. 

FR 201 Intermediate French I

4 cr.

Satisfies the formal communication studies requirement.

Prerequisites: FR 102 or two years of high school French.

FR 201 reviews all grammar and major topics from FR 101 and FR 102.  This course incorporates more reading, writing and conversation than in first-year courses, and explores more matters dealing with French cultures.  Students expand their proficiency into areas such as expressing opinions and persuading.

FR 202  Intermediate French II

4 cr.

Satisfies the formal communication studies requirement.

Prerequisites: FR 201 or three years of high school French.

FR 202 is a continuation of FR 201.  Students do considerably more reading and writing than in prior courses.  The course expands their cultural and linguistic proficiency.

FR 299 Apprenticeship

1-2 cr.

Graded S/U.

May be taken for a maximum of 2 credits.

Prerequisites: Written department approval.

Directed apprentice work and activities that would require students to use their knowledge of French and develop their competencies in the language. This would include such things as oral expression, appreciation of grammatical structure, proofreading and editing skills, research skills in French, and skills in teaching French to others.

FR 300 Reading and Writing

4 cr.

Prerequisites: FR 202 or instructor permission.

This course teaches essential reading and writing skills in French (mastery of form, content, style and purpose of genre writing, use of dictionary, root analysis, decoding, comparison of sentence structure, identification of meaning through analysis, use of contextual cues). Materials will consist of French newspapers, magazines, short stories and will prepare the student for subsequent upper level courses.

FR 305 Conversational French and Phonetics

4 cr.

Satisfies the formal communication studies requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Prerequisites: FR 202 or instructor permission.

Students improve their conversational abilities through emphasis on natural forms of speech and by learning how to use language in social encounters. Students learn to communicate and respond to problems as well as discuss major social issues. A variety of contexts is used to create authentic situations.

FR 310 Introduction to French Civilization and Culture

4 cr.

FR 310 is taught in English.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and completion of  EN 211.

An overview of early European history; a comprehensive view of France’s geography and 2,000 years of social customs and how they are reflected in the arts, music, architecture, and literature. The course includes aspects of the interaction between France and the U.S.

FR 315 Medieval Culture and Literature of France

4 cr.

FR 315 is taught in English.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and completion of EN 211. For those taking this course for a major or minor in French, FR 202 is a prerequisite.

This course is an introduction to Medieval life in France. The period covered is from the 5th to the 15th century. It covers three major aspects: historical background, everyday life, and literature.

FR 361 Survey of French Literature from the Medieval Period to the 17th Century

4 cr.

Prerequisites: FR 300 or instructor permission.

Students examine some of the masterpieces of French literature from the medieval period through the seventeenth century. The texts studied serve as springboards to consideration of art, culture, language, history, and humanity.

FR 362 Survey of French Literature of the 18th and 19th Centuries

4 cr.

Prerequisites: FR 300 or instructor permission.

An examination of some of the masterpieces of French’s eighteenth and nineteenth century literature.  The texts studied serve as springboards to consideration of art, culture, language, history, and humanity.

FR 363 Survey of French Literature of the 20th Century

4 cr.

Prerequisites: FR 300 or instructor permission.

A study of some of the masterpieces of France’s twentieth century literature.  The texts studied serve as springboards to consideration of art, culture, language, history, and humanity.

FR 400 Advanced French Composition and Grammar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: FR 300, or instructor permission.

A review of all major points of the French grammar system, with an especially intense focus on the rich verb system and common problems native English speakers have in French.  In an interrelated way, it also provides the opportunity for students to refine their writing skills through composition of essays, letters, and resumes.

FR 426 Eighteenth Century French Literature

4 cr.

Prerequisites: FR 300, or instructor permission.

Students examine some of the masterpieces of France’s eighteenth century literature. The texts studied serve as springboards to consideration of art, culture, language, history, and humanity.

FR 428 Twentieth Century French Novel

4 cr.

Prerequisites: FR 300, or instructor permission.

Students examine some of the masterpieces of France’s twentieth century literature. The texts studied serve as springboards to consideration of art, culture, language, history, and humanity.

FR 495 Special Topics in French

1-4 cr.

May be repeated for credit if topic varies.

Prerequisites: Instructor permission and junior standing.

This is an experimental course based on topics of authors, genres, or literature periods not covered in other regularly approved French courses. 

FR 498 Directed Study in French

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Instructor and department head permission, junior standing.

Independent study by qualified students. A directed study course is designed to meet a specific academic requirement of the student who is unable to earn the credit during regularly scheduled course offerings. The student and professor agree to the specific topic and requirements needed to earn the credit.

GC

(Geography Department)

GC 001 Geographic Information Science Certified

0 cr.

Graded S/U

Indicates that the student has successfully completed all of the core and elective classes in the GIS minor with a minimum grade point average of 3.0. Student registers in this course during the semester in which they complete the requirements for the minor.

GC 100 Physical Geography

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of natural sciences/mathematics requirement.

Does not meet the laboratory course graduation requirement.

Examination of the earth’s physical phenomena to develop a knowledge and appreciation of the relationships between human activities and environmental processes.

GC 164 Human Geography

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of social sciences requirement.

Satisfies the world cultures requirement.

Examination of the culturally induced differences in the world pattern of population growth, resource utilization, language, religion, agriculture, industry, political systems, and environmental impact.

GC 200 North America

4 cr.

Analysis of the physical and cultural geography of Canada and the United States.

GC 202 Soils

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Prerequisites: GC 100 or permission of instructor.

Study of soil classification, soil survey applications, laboratory and field procedures, and soil management.

GC 205 Introduction to Geographic Research

4 cr.

Prerequisites: AIS 101, completion of the foundations of communication requirement and sophomore standing.

An introduction to geographic thought and geographic research methods. Included are a survey of the history and philosophy of changes in the discipline of geography, and an introduction to the writings of historical and contemporary geographers. Research includes an examination of professional journals, book reviews, proposal development, and literature searches.

GC 220 Economic Geography

4 cr.

Analysis of the spatial characteristics of the economic environment and the economic principles related to resource use in the private and public sectors.

GC 225 Introduction to Maps

2 cr. (1-0-2)

Prerequisite: MA 100 or instructor permission.

Maps are important tools for understanding geographic patterns. This course introduces students to major concepts and applications in the reading, use, and interpretation of maps. It is designed to provide a foundation in maps as well as to prepare students for upper level courses in spatial sciences.

GC 235 Quantitative Methods

4 cr.

Prerequisites: CIS 110 and MA 103.

Presentation and interpretation of data, descriptive statistics and measures of spatial patterns, introduction to statistical inference and measures of association, with particular reference to geographic examples.

GC 246 Earth Science

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Satisfies the foundations of natural sciences/mathematics requirement.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Analysis of essential observations and concepts in meteorology, astronomy, oceanography and geology and their significance in understanding human kind’s relation to the environment. Does not count toward a major or minor in geography or earth science.

GC 255 Physical Geology

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Satisfies the foundations of natural sciences/mathematics requirement.

The structures of the earth, minerals, rocks, and the development of landforms.

GC 260 Minerals and Rocks

4 cr. (3-0-2)

This course meets over the first half of the semester.

Prerequisite: GC 255.

The study of common rocks and minerals. Special attention is given to Michigan rocks and minerals, their occurrence, formation, and economic importance. Field trips are required and are commonly taken in the laboratory period.

GC 280 Field Techniques and Mapping

5 cr.

Prerequisites: GC 225 and MA 103 or MA 104 or MA 105.

Examination of the techniques and tools used to gather spatial data, and the application of this knowledge to a problem.

GC 300 Regional Studies: World Cultures

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of social sciences requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Satisfies the world cultures requirement.

Prerequisites: Completion of the foundations of communication requirement and sophomore standing. May be taken more than once, but not for the same region.

Regional focus determined by demand and faculty availability.

GC 305 Regional Studies

4. cr.

Satisfies the foundations of social sciences requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Prerequisites Completion of the foundations of communication requirement and sophomore standing. May be taken more than once, but not for the same region.

Regional focus is determined by demand and faculty availability.

GC 310 Urban Geography

4 cr.

Prerequisites: GC 220 and GC 205, or successful completion of the writing proficiency exam, or instructor permission.

Study of the development, form, and function of urban places, and the interactions of humans, cities, and regions.

GC 316 Geography of Tourism

4 cr.

Prerequisites: GC 164 and GC 205 or permission of instructor.

Understand the historical development of tourism, its importance to local and national economies, and the impact that tourists have upon the environment, economy, and local cultures.

GC 317 Geography of Food Systems

4 cr.

Prerequisites: GC 205 or EN 211 or instructor's permission.

This course examines the different forces acting upon commodity flows from producer to consumer.  Particular attention is given to the following topics:  the transition from agriculture to food manufacturing, globalization and food production, and the environmental impact of food manufacturing.

GC 320 Environmental Policy and Regulation

4 cr.

Prerequisites: Eight hours of GC credit, including  GC 101, and junior standing.

Examination of the history and status of land use and environmental laws in the U.S. at the national, regional, and state levels. Included is an introduction to the policy-making process in the U.S. as related to the area of environmental policy. The paradox of that policy in terms of short vs. long-term solutions will be investigated.

GC 330 Planning Theory and Practice

2 cr.

Prerequisite: GC 205.

Study of land use planning from its beginnings through contemporary comprehensive and policy plans. The focus is on planning as a technical, political, and economic process.

GC 335 Geographic Information Systems

4 cr.

Prerequisites: GC 225 and GC 235 or instructor permission.

The study of computer-based manipulation of geographic data. Introduction to geographic information systems and sciences including geographic data modeling, hardware, software, GIS data integration, visualization, cartographic modeling, basic and advanced GIS analysis methods, organizational issues, GIS project development and emerging geographic information science issues.

GC 337 Computer Cartography

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Prerequisites: GC 335 or instructor permission.

The study of computer-based visualization of geographic data.  Introduction to computer cartography including thematic mapping, cartographic projections for map designers, basemap compilation, cartographic symbols, statistics for cartography, mapping in GIS environment, data classification, legend design, mapping point, line, aereal and volume phenomena, cartogram, color mapping, map composition technique, interactive mapping and mapping on the world wide web.

GC 340 Land Use Controls

2 cr.

Prerequisites: GC 205, GC 330 and junior standing.

Study of land-use controls and the relationship of these controls to planning theory and practice.

GC  350 Methods and Materials in Teaching Social Studies Education

4 cr.

May not be applied toward a non-teaching major or any minor in geography.

Prerequisite: Admission to the methods phase of teacher education.

Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ED 349.

Strategies, methods, materials, and media that can be used to improve the teaching-learning process of geography in grades seven through 12.

GC 360 Population Geography

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of social sciences requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Prerequisite: Completion of the foundations of communication requirement and sophomore standing; GC 164 and/or GC 220 recommended.

Examination of demographic processes and how these vary from one society to another. Considers, in depth, data sources, population geography literature, and techniques used in analyzing population characteristics and distributions.

GC 365 Historical Geology

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Prerequisite: GC 255.

Examination of the techniques used by geologists in interpreting earth history. Particular attention is given to the physiographic provinces of the United States with particular attention to the Canadian Shield and interior plains and plateaus.

GC 370 Geomorphology

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Prerequisite: GC 100  or GC 255 or instructor permission.

The study of earth surface processes and landforms. Surface features created by streams, glaciers, shorelines, groundwater and wind will be studied. Topographic maps, aerial photographs, the Atlas of Landforms, and satellite imagery will be used in labs. Field trips are part of the course.

GC 385 Weather and Climate

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Prerequisite: GC 100 or instructor permission.

Introduction to climatology, including principal processes of the global climatic systems and their variation over space and time. Topics will include: introduction to the atmosphere and global atmospheric circulation, including tropical, mid latitude, and polar subsystems; radiation/heat exchanges, the hydrologic cycle, global climate patterns, climate change, measurement and data sources and urban climatic systems and interactions.

GC 390 Oceanography

2 cr.

Prerequisite: none.

Examination of historical, chemical, and physical, aspects of the world’s oceans and seas. The course also deals with the interaction of water bodies with the atmosphere, solar energy, and gravity.

GC 401 Biogeography

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Prerequisites: GC 100, BI 111, junior standing or instructor permission.

Examination of the spatial distribution of life forms on a global scale from ecological and historical perspectives.  Topics include diversity, extinction, and dispersal of species.

GC 425 Remote Sensing

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Prerequisites: GC 225 and a course in statistics (GC 235 or equivalent), junior standing or instructor permission.

The study of remotely sensed imagery and datasets for spatial analysis. Introduction to aerial photographic interpretation techniques and computer digital image processing of satellite and other spatial datasets, including preprocessing techniques, enhancements, classification, and GIS modeling.

GC 428 Spatial Analysis

4 cr.

Prerequisites: GC 335 or GC 425 or instructor permission.

Examines the collection and management of spatial data. The application of appropriate quantitative and cartographic tools for the analysis of geographic and planning problems is emphasized.

GC 435 Geography of Michigan

4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Study of the physical, historical, and cultural geography of Michigan.

GC 445 Advanced Aerial Photograph Interpretation and Photogrammetry

2 cr. (1-0-2)

Prerequisites: GC 100, GC 225, GC 425 and junior standing or instructor permission.

An advanced examination of the principles of aerial photograph interpretation and photogrammetric methods. Applications in several disciplines including geography, soils, forestry and ecological studies, geology and geomorphology, engineering, urban, and industrial studies, and archaeology and cultural resource management are examined. Comprehension of natural and cultural processes that have produced landscape features and geographic patterns visible on aerial photographs are stressed. Personal student interests are encouraged through completion of an individual air photo interpretation and mapping project.

GC 455 Digital Image Processing

2 cr. (1-0-2)

Prerequisites: GC 225, GC 425 and junior standing or instructor permission.

Digital image processing of satellite and aircraft derived remotely sensed data for earth resource management applications.

GC 465 Hydrology

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Prerequisites: GC 235 or MA 171, junior standing or instructor permission.

Study of the hydrologic cycle. Precipitation, runoff, interception, and groundwater processes are addressed. Measurement techniques and analytical methods are also presented. Informed decision-making with regard to the water cycle is stressed. Some field work required.

GC 470 Environmental Ethics

4 cr.

Prerequisites: Twelve hours of GC credit, including ENV 101, GC 205 and senior standing or instructor permission.

Various perspectives and philosophies concerning the natural environment and resource utilization are explored in order to give the student a basis on which to develop an ethical perspective.  An in-depth survey of both historical and contemporary viewpoints will be conducted. The human factor in addressing natural resource issues is emphasized.

GC 475 Environmental Impact Assessment

4 cr.

Prerequisites: GC 205, GC 320 and senior standing or instructor permission.

A field course in which the student develops and organizes an environmental impact assessment for a local project. Involves the laws governing environmental decision, and the laws governing the content of environmental impact statements (as mandated by NEPA).

GC 485 Planning Practicum

4 cr.

Prerequisites: GC 205, GC 330, GC 335, GC 340 and senior standing or instructor permission.

Development of planning skills by working through planning problems in a real world context.

GC 489 Human Impact Upon the Environment

4 cr.

Prerequisites: GC 205, GC 235 and 24 GC credit hours,  junior standing or instructor permission.

Examination of historical and contemporary roles of humans as a major agent of environmental change on Earth. Emphasis will be placed on anthropogenic changes to plant and animal communities; water, air, and soil resources; and the  potential for human induced global climate change.

GC 490 Seminar

2-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Departmental major and junior standing or instructor permission.

The opportunity to apply skills and concepts developed within departmental programs.

GC 491 Internship

2-6 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: Overall GPA of 2.75 and 88 credits hours or instructor permission.

A practical experience with a private, municipal, county, state, and/or federal agency.

GC 492 Research in Water Science

2 cr. (0-0-6)

Prerequisites: Water science major and junior standing or instructor permission.

Introduction to environmentally related research. Projects are pursued in cooperation with a faculty research advisor. The research advisor and research problem must be selected a semester prior to registration. Students must submit a written and oral final report.

GC 495 Special Topics in Geography

2-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Special study of problems and/or regions which are not part of the regular offerings.

GC 498 Directed Studies in Geography

1-4 cr.

Prerequisite: Major or minor in geography, earth science, conservation, or planning, junior standing or instructor permission.

An opportunity for the student to work on a specific topic.

GR

(Modern Languages and Literatures Department)

GR 101 Elementary German I

4 cr.

Satisfies the formal communication studies requirement.

GR 101 is an introduction to the German language and cultures of the people who speak it. Students learn rudimentary “survival” skills such as social pleasantries, shopping, exchanging money, eating in restaurants, talking about family, school and weather.

GR 102 Elementary German II

4 cr.

Satisfies the formal communication studies requirement.

Prerequisites: GR 101 or one year of high school German.

GR 102 is a continuation of GR 101. Students add to their proficiency in matters such as those related to health, free time, employment, travel, and talking about the past. 

GR 201 Intermediate German I

4 cr.

Satisfies the formal communication studies requirement.

Prerequisites: GR 102 or two years of high school German.

GR 202 is a continuation of GR 201. Students do considerably more reading and writing than in prior courses. The course expands their cultural proficiency.

GR 202 Intermediate German II

4 cr.

Satisfies the formal communication studies requirement.

Prerequisites: GR 201 or three years of high school German.

GR 202 is a continuation of GR 201. Students do considerably more reading and writing than in prior courses. The course expands their cultural and linguistic proficiency.

GR 299 Apprenticeship

1-2 cr.

Graded S/U.

May be taken for a maximum of 2 credit hours.

Prerequisites: Written department approval.

Directed apprentice work and activities that would require students to use their knowledge of German and develop their competencies in the language. This would include such things as oral expression, appreciation of grammatical structure, proofreading and editing skills, research skills in German, and skills in teaching German to others.

GR 300 German Reading and Writing

4 cr.

Prerequisites: GR 202 or instructor permission.

This course teaches essential reading and writing skills in German (use of dictionary, comparison of sentence structure, identification of meaning through analysis, use of contextual cues). Readings will include literary works in three genres. Student writings and revisions will serve as the basis for developing grammatical and stylistic skills.

GR 305 Conversational German

4 cr.

Satisfies the formal communication studies requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Prerequisites: GR 202 or instructor permission.

GR 305 focuses on improving the conversational abilities of students through reinforcement of three basic language functions: description, narration, and opinion.  Students learn how to communicate and respond to problems, and discuss major social issues.

GR 310 Introduction to German Civilization and Culture

4 cr.

GR 310 is taught in English.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Prerequisites: GR 300 or instructor permission for students applying course to a German major or minor. Completion of the EN 211 and sophomore standing when taken for liberal studies credit.

This course is a multidisciplinary introduction to the culture and civilization of Germany. It offers a comprehensive view of the historical, geographical, political and economic factors which have helped shape today’s German society. Students who minor or major in German will be asked to do reading and writing assignments in German. All subsequent German courses are conducted in German.

GR 400 Advanced German Composition and Grammar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: GR 300, or instructor permission.

A review of all major points of the German grammar system, with an especially intense focus on the rich verb system and common problems native English speakers have in German. In an interrelated way, it also provides the opportunity for students to refine their writing skills through composition of essays, letters, and resumes.

GR 495 Special Topics in German

1-4 cr.

May be repeated for credit if topic varies.

Prerequisites: Junior standing, instructor and department head permission.

This is an experimental course based on topics of authors, genres, or literature periods not covered in other regularly approved German courses. 

GR 498 Directed Study in German

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing, instructor and department head permission.

Independent study by qualified students. A directed study course is designed to meet a specific academic requirement of the student who is unable to earn the credit during regularly scheduled course offerings. The student and professor agree to the specific topic and requirements needed to earn the credit.

GRN

(Sociology and Social Work Department)

GRN 001 Internship Completion

0 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites:  Completion of 4 credits of GRN 490 or GRN 490 plus additional field placement credits to equal 4 credits.

Indicates that the student has completed the internship requirement for the gerontology minor.

GRN 101 Introduction to Gerontology

 4 cr.

This course is designed to provide an overview of the physical, psychological and social aspects of aging.  It examines the aging process as experienced by the individual and how aging impacts the entire society. Theories related to aging are studied and students gain exposure to the use of the scientific method to investigate biological, psychological and social aspects of aging. Some of the topics covered in the course include the distinction between normal and abnormal aging and the impact class, race, ethnicity and gender exert on the life course. Societal attitudes and beliefs about growing old will be explored and how these social constructs influence the development of policies designed to assist this population.

GRN 490 Gerontology Field Placement

 1 - 4 cr.

Prerequisites: Gerontology minor, completion of gerontology minor core.

Students who are required to take a field placement for their major would have to enroll for at least one GRN 490 credit and make the additional three credit hours up with an approved gerontology minor course substitution.

Provides students in the gerontology minor with the opportunity to interface with older adults in a social or health care setting. It provides a learning experience for the student, in cooperation with the professional community serving older adults. It provides hands-on experience designed to benefit the student as they move toward their own career objectives.

HL

(Health, Physical Education, and Recreation Department)

HL 101 Medical Terminology for Health Educators

1 cr.

A course specific to the needs of health educators in which a search is made into the terms and abbreviations commonly found in health related literature and medical usage.

HL 110 Introduction to Health and Fitness Education

2 cr.

An introduction to the logic of health promotion and health education, which includes discussions concerning historical context, professional organizations, behavior change models, professional ethics, and programming models.

HL 111 Personal Wellness

4 cr.

Study of the intellectual, emotional, social, physical, occupational, environmental, and spiritual components of wellness with a view to addressing developmental tasks related to decisions concerning self-direction and self-management.

HL 150 Health Education for the Elementary School Teacher

2 cr.

Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education.

A course designed to acquaint prospective elementary teachers with a framework for comprehensive school health education. Emphasis on background information and strategies for teaching health promoting and disease preventing behaviors. Including an understanding of the physical, social, emotional, and intellectual factors which influence health issues and health behaviors.

HL 211 Health Aspects of Aging

3 cr.

An exploration of preventive health behaviors that impact normal aging and common age related disease processes. Adaptations to these preventive behaviors to accommodate advancing age will be discussed. Theoretical issues in promoting the health of older adults will be introduced and applied to the health promotion needs of older adults.

HL 212 Suicide Education

2 cr.

Introduction to child, adolescent, and adult suicides, the suicide personality, basic intervention techniques, and the professional’s personal values and attitudes toward suicide.

HL 213 Death Education

2 cr.

An interdisciplinary view of death and grieving, development of insights into our personal values and attitudes, as well as an understanding of the involvement others experience in the death and grieving process.

HL 215 Cardiovascular Risk Factor Education

1 cr.

Exploration of factors that contribute to the development of diseases of the vascular system, including heart disease.

HL 240 Community Health

2 cr.

Study of community and public health organization and practice, with special emphasis on the individual’s responsibility to a community health program.

HL 242 Emergency Health Care

2 cr.

Study of basic concepts and techniques for administering Emergency First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation to those who are sick or injured. Satisfactory completion of the course entitles the student to the American Red Cross certificate for "Responding to Emergencies".

HL 245 Basic Emergency Medical Technician Training I

4 cr. (4-0-4)

May not be applied toward the secondary education major or secondary education minor in health education.

Prerequisites: HL 101 and BI 104, or instructor permission.

Instruction in pre-hospital emergency medical care of the sick and injured; beginning from the time of the initial call for help through the transfer of care to the receiving medical facility, including scene management, patient packaging and care during transport. Successful completion of both HL 245 and HL 246 is required before the student may apply to take the National Registry Basic EMT licensing exam for the State of Michigan.

HL 246 Basic Emergency Medical Technician Training II

4 cr. (4-0-4)

May not be applied toward any major or minor in health education other than the minor in Emergency Medical Services.

Prerequisite: HL 245.

A continuation of HL 245.

HL 296 Special Topics in Health Education

1-4 cr.

Graded S/U.

Detailed study of one or more special problems in health education.

HL 311 Health Communication

2 cr.

Prerequisite: HL 111 and HL 240.

The course provides theoretical and practical communication techniques required for individuals in health professions. Various modes of oral, body and written communication will be addressed.

HL 315 Consumer Health and Quackery

3 cr.

Introduction to the health care delivery system in the United States and the use of that system by the consumer. Special emphasis on questionable health practices, health practitioners and health products.

HL 322 International Health Issues

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of social sciences requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Satisfies world cultures requirement.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and completion of the foundations of communication requirement.

A survey of the cultural, economic, environmental, historical, and political concepts associated with the delivery of health care to various world populations. Major determinates of health status in several regions of the world are studied in concert with patterns of intervention at the local, community, national, and international levels.

HL 340 School Health Program

3 cr.

Survey of the total school health program for elementary and secondary schools, including health instruction, school health services, and the school health environment.

HL 350 Methods and Materials in Teaching Health Education

3 cr.

May not be applied toward a non-teaching major or any minor in health education.

Prerequisites: Admission to the methods phase of teacher education and HL 340.

Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ED 349.

Study of methods and scientific materials that support health instruction programs in the secondary schools, and their measurement and evaluation.

HL 367 Planning and Evaluation in Health and Fitness

4 cr.

Concepts of program planning and evaluation and how they apply to programming in the area of health promotion and health education for assessing individual and community needs for health education; planning safe, relevant, and effective health programs; implementation of programs; and evaluation of programs.

HL 368 Programming in Health and Fitness

2 cr.

Prerequisite: HL 367

Survey of programming models in health promotion in corporate, commercial, residential, community, university, governmental, entrepreneurial settings for several target populations over a variety of topic areas (fitness, stress management, ergonomics, etc.). Explores how health promotion experts use planning and evaluation concepts/models to determine the effectiveness of their programs.

HL 440 Critical Issues in Health Education

3 cr.

Prerequisites: HL 111, junior standing or instructor permission.

An in-depth, multidisciplinary approach to the study of health related problems within our changing society.

HL 450 Human Sexuality: Educational Issues

3 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Study of materials relevant to sex education programs found in public school systems, as well as materials related to human sexuality.

HL 460 Human Disease Education

4 cr.

Prerequisites: HL 101, HL 111, and a course in human anatomy and physiology, junior standing or instructor permission.

Introduction to the rudiments of disease processes and basic components of diseases commonly found in our society.

HL 470 Electrocardiography

1 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

The course provides a study of the electrophysiological basis of the ECG. The development of a conceptual understanding of cardiac anatomy, events, and metabolism underlying various ECG responses will be stressed.

HL 485 Drug Use and Abuse

3 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Survey of the psychosocial, medical, and legal aspects of drug use as it exists in our country. Emphasis is placed on the non medical use of drugs as well as upon the self-destructive use of drugs leading to chemical dependencies.

HL 490 Seminar in Health Education

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Detailed exploration of special topics and faculty research.

HL 491 Internship in Management of Health and Fitness

2-8 cr.

Graded S/U.

Up to 4 credit hours may be earned for on campus internship, up to 8 credit hours may be earned through an off-campus internship. If off-campus internship is chosen, approval of internship site and supervisor is required. (See off-site internship packet.)

Prerequisites: Open only to management of health and fitness majors, HL 471, HL 472, Junior standing or instructor permission.

Supervised experience enabling the student to apply theoretical knowledge in a practical situation.

HL 492 Field Experience in Community Health

2-4 cr. (Arr.)

Prerequisites: Prior approval of Coordinator for Health Education, junior standing or instructor permission. Approval of fieldwork site and supervisor required.

Students will be assigned to work 6 to 12 hours per week in a community health agency. This will give students an opportunity to practice inter-professional collaboration within the community.

HL 495 Special Topics in Health Education

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Detailed study of one or more special topics in health education.

HL 496 Special Topics in Health Education

1-4 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Detailed study of one or more special topics in health education.

HL 497 Directed Studies in Health Education

1-4 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Independent study or research in health education.

HL 498 Directed Studies in Health Education

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Independent study or research in health education.

HM

(Technology and Occupational Sciences Department)

HM 000 Work Experience

0 cr.

Prerequisite: Open only to associate degree students.

300 hours of industry related on-the-job experience in an authorized restaurant or institutional management operation.  Students must complete a minimum of 300 hours of field experience prior to graduation with the associate degree.  All work sites must be approved by the department and require verification of work submitted by the student.

HM 001 Work Experience

0 cr.

Prerequisite: Open only to baccalaureate students.

900 hours of industry related on-the-job experience in an authorized restaurant or institutional management operation.  Students must complete a minimum of 900 hours of field experience prior to graduation with the baccalaureate degree.  All work sites must be approved by the department and require verification of work submitted by the student.

HM 100 Food Selection and Preparation

4 cr. (3-0-2)

The student will be introduced to the principles of food selection, composition and preparation. This includes purchasing guides and nutritional principles. The lab portion will serve to reinforce the lecture sessions.

HM 111 Food Service Sanitation

3 cr.

A study of all aspects of food service sanitation, proper sanitation, and sanitizing procedures and the role management must play in the instruction of employees in proper sanitation methods. Successful completion of an examination administered by the Educational Foundation for the Food Service Industry will result in certification from the National Restaurant Association.

HM 112 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry

4 cr.

Prerequisite or corequisite: HM 111.

This course provides a basic understanding of the hospitality industry and its various segments as they relate to organizational dynamics and career paths.

HM 115 Professional Cooking I

4 cr.  (1-0-9)

Prerequisite or corequisite: HM 111.

Students gain practical experience in quantity production by operating the Jacobetti Center Cafeteria, rotating through front and back of the house stations, learning to cook and serve quantity foods for public consumption. Emphasis is on creating eye appeal, texture, and palatability of quantity cooking and the proper techniques of preparation, cooking, holding, and serving.

HM 116 Baking I

4 cr. (1-0-6)

Prerequisite or corequisite: HM 111.

Topics covered include ingredients and their purpose, mixing methods, the basic steps to baking and general procedures in the production of cookies, muffins, biscuits, breads, rolls and specialty items. Students gain practical experience by preparing baked goods for the Jacobetti Center cafeteria operation and special function orders.

HM 120 Professional Cooking II

4 cr. (1-0-9)

Prerequisites: HM 111 and HM 115.

Experience in restaurant food production by participating in the operation of the Jacobetti Center Chez Nous restaurant. Students will gain hands-on experience with the production side of the restaurants computerized point-of-sale system.

HM 125 Professional Baking II

4 cr. (1-0-6)

Prerequisites: HM 111 and HM 116.

Students further their knowledge of baking in learning the techniques and the preparation of cakes, pies, pastries, tortes, danish, puff pastry, croissants, and specialty items. Practical experience is provided by preparing baked goods for the Jacobetti Center Chez Nous restaurant operation, special functions, and customer orders.

HM 210 Supervision in the Hospitality Industry

4 cr. (1-0-9)

Prerequisites: HM 111 and HM 120.

A study of the supervisory skills necessary to manage a staff of hospitality employees. Students get hands-on supervisory experience in the Jacobetti Center production area.

HM 214 Cost Control for the Hospitality Industry

4 cr.

Prerequisites: MA 100 or department permission.

This course presents practical techniques for protecting profits in the hospitality industry, by building a sound foundation of management cost control procedures.

HM 221 Hospitality Services Management

4 cr. (1-0-6)

Prerequisite: HM 210.

This course provides the student with knowledge and experience in the hospitality industry while operating the program's restaurant. The student will be exposed to the proper styles of service, the manager's role in the dining room, and the restaurant's computerized point-of-sale system.

HM 225 Banquets and Catering

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Prerequisites: HM 210 or instructor permission.

Hotel banquet operations and catering organization procedures including setup, layout, pricing, costing, on- and off- premise events, bar and wine service will be discussed in depth.

HM 226 Purchasing for the Hospitality Industry

2 cr.

This course examines purchasing from a management viewpoint including both food and non-food expense items such as furniture, fixtures, and equipment. Topics concerning receiving storage and security will be discussed.

HM 240 Hotel and Lodging Operations

3 cr.

Covers the organizational structure within which a hotel operates. This course examines the economic and financial aspects of lodging operations. Basic information about departmental development, pre-opening, marketing and operations will be provided. Students will examine trends in new areas of hotel development.

HM 298 Special Topics in Hospitality

1-4 cr.

Various topics of current interest tot he student. Topics will require departmental approval and will pertain to the food service and hospitality industry.

HM 310 Menu Analysis and Design

4 cr.

Prerequisite: HM 211.

A study of the essential elements necessary for developing a successful food service menu. Aspects of design, sales mix, marketing, and menu analysis. Exercises will result in the student designing a restaurant and cycle menu.

HM 315 Multi-Cultural Foods

4 cr. (3-0-2)

Prerequisite: HM 221 or instructor permission.

A study of the national and regional cooking styles found around the world. This course will expose the student to the culinary practices of various cultures through a lecture format and then provide practical experience as the student prepares and tastes the foods of selected cultures in a laboratory situation at the Jacobetti Center kitchen.

HM 318 Resort Development

4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or department approval.

This course is a study of the world of resorts and resort management. The resort industry will be examined from a managerial point of view, with emphasis on project planning, marketing, promotion and recreational activities.

HM 330 Beverage and Bar Management

4 cr.

Prerequisites: HM 214 or instructor permission.

This course provides a study of the purchase, receipt, storage, control, and retail sales of both alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages. A thorough overview of wines, beers, and spirits is provided.

HM 401 Internship

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Practical, applied experience involving placement in a job situation.

HM 450 Hospitality Operations Plan and Design

4 cr.

Prerequisite: HM 221, junior standing or instructor permission.

This course will teach the student about planning and design techniques used in the construction of a hospitality facility from the initial concept to the opening of the facility for business.

HM 480 Current Issues in the Hospitality Industry

4 cr. (1-3-0)

Prerequisites: Senior status or instructor permission.

A capstone course for students in the hospitality management program. This course will look at contemporary issues in the field of hospitality management and address their implications for the hospitality professional.

HM 495 Special Topics in Hospitality

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval, junior standing.

Various topics of current interest to the student. Topics will require departmental approval and will pertain to the hospitality industries.

HM 498 Directed Study in Hospitality Management

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and instructor permission.

Individual study of a significant topic or problem in the practice of hospitality management.

HN

(Health, Physical Education, and Recreation Department)

HN 210 Nutrition for Humans

4 cr.

Survey of dietary requirements and processes, sources of the various nutrients, the relationships of food to health, the role of diet in prevention of diseases, and methods of improving eating habits at different age levels and in different cultures. The course assumes and expands on some high school science background.

HN 297 Directed Studies

1-4 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: Instructor and department head permission. For freshmen or sophomore students only.

Individual study.

HN 298 Directed Studies

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Instructor and department head permission. For freshmen or sophomore students only.

Individual study.

HN 301 Nutrition for Health Professions

4 cr.

Principles of normal and therapeutic nutrition as they relate to the treatment of various physical and mental disorders and to various medications.

HN 362 Cultural Food Patterns

4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Consideration of economic, environmental, historical, and psychological aspects of food habits; influence of national and international dietary patterns on nutrition of individuals.

HN 415 Obesity and Weight Management

4 cr.

Prerequisites: HN 210, BI 202 junior standing or instructor permission.

Study of current theories surrounding the causes of and control of obesity. Students will apply their understanding of the fundamentals of human nutrition and exercise to construct programs containing sound principles of weight management and total fitness.

HN 451 Advanced Nutrition

4 cr.

Prerequisites: Students are encouraged to select a total of eight credits from the following: CH 107, CH 108, BI 104, BI 202, HN 210. Junior standing or instructor permission.

Study of human nutrition based on fundamental knowledge of biochemistry and physiology. Lectures and reports of current research.

HN 495 Special Topics

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Basic course in area of study.

HN 496 Special Topics

1-4 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Basic course in area of study.

HN 497 Directed Study

1-4 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and instructor and department head permission.

Individual study.

HN 498 Directed Study

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and instructor and department head permission.

Individual study.

HON

(Honors Program)

HON 001  Honors Program Completion

0 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites:  Enrollment in the honors program, senior status, completion of core and cognate honors courses.

Indicates that the student has successfully completed all of the requirements of the honors program, including the honors thesis or equivalent.  Student registers in this course during the semester in which they complete the honors program requirements.

HON 101 Origins of Western Values-Antiquity

4 cr.

Prerequisites: Course enrollment is restricted to students admitted to the honors program.

The course will investigate the origins in the worlds of the Hebrews, Greeks, and Romans of ideas and values central to western culture. Readings will be drawn from primary sources in the Jewish and Christian scriptures and from the writings of Greek and Roman philosophers, poets, and playwrights. The course will have a heavy writing component, including written responses to and reflections on the readings.

HON 102 Origins of Western Values-Medieval to Modern

4 cr.

Prerequisites: Course enrollment is restricted to students admitted to the honors program and who have successfully completed HON 101.

The course will be of the same format as HON 101, except that the writing component will include a major paper. Readings, almost entirely from primary sources, will be drawn from major writers and thinkers of the medieval, renaissance, reformation, enlightenment, and romantic periods.

HON 111 Modern Art-European Sources

4 cr.

Prerequisites: Course enrollment is restricted to students admitted to the honors program.

This course will investigate the primarily European aesthetic theories and art forms that influenced contemporary music, performance, and the visual arts.

HON 112 Modern Art-American Sources

4 cr.

Prerequisites: Course enrollment is restricted to students admitted to the Honors Program who have successfully passed HON 111.

This course is a continuation of HON 111 which then explores the aesthetic concepts that were refined and others that were developed in American music, performance, and the visual arts.

HON 211: The Social Sciences

4 cr.

Prerequisites: Sophomore status and enrollment in the honors program.

The course introduces the student to some of the major ideas and developments in the social sciences from antiquity to the present.  The goal of the course is to explore the development of the scientific method as well as some of the major intellectual ideas and scientific discoveries in the social sciences.  The course also explores the impact of science and scientific thought on society and shows how the social sciences have been a powerful force in shaping the modern world.

HON 212: The Natural Sciences

4 cr.

Prerequisites: Sophomore status and enrollment in the honors program.

This is an honors interdisciplinary course based on topical issues of current interest in areas such as biology, chemistry, physics, psychology or earth sciences and related topics.  The goal of the course is to understand the scientific method as well as some of the major ideas and scientific discoveries in the natural sciences.  This course also explores the interconnection of science and scientific thought and shows how the natural sciences have been a powerful force in shaping contemporary life.

HP

(Health, Physical Education, and Recreation Department)

HP 090 Geriatric Swimming

1 cr.

Swimming exercise for senior citizens.

HP 091 Geriatric Exercise

1 cr.

Conditioning exercise for senior citizens.

HP 200 Physical Well Being

1 cr.

A lecture class on the foundations and principles of physical fitness and health.  Students will learn to recognize the hazards of being unfit and inactive; to determine individual levels of physical fitness; and, to acquire the knowledge and skills to achieve and maintain a personal satisfaction level of physical fitness.

HP 205 Archery

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of archery.

HP 206 Backpacking

1 cr.

Students learn about backpacking and planning a trip. A weekend trip off campus is required.

HP 208 Basketball

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of basketball.

HP 209 Bicycling-Mountain

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of off-road bicycling.

HP 211 Bowling-Beginning

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of bowling. Lab fee required.

HP 212 Flatwater Canoeing

1 cr.

Emphasis is on tandem flatwater canoeing, although solo paddling is also introduced. Students learn equipment handling on land and water; terminology; hull control; power; turning and bracing strokes; maneuvers for going ahead, abeam, and astern; rescue of self and others, wind paddling; day tripping. A swimming test must be passed at the first course session to continue in the course.

HP 212S Solo Flatwater Canoeing

1 cr.

Students learn equipment handling on land and water; terminology; hull control; power; turning and bracing strokes; maneuvers for going ahead and abeam; rescue of self and others; wind paddling; day tripping. Prior canoeing experience not needed. ACA certification is offered. A swimming test must be passed at the first course session to continue in the course. Course usually meets on two weekends.

HP 212F Freestyle Canoeing

1 cr.

Prerequisite: HP 212 or HP 212S.

Students learn equipment handling; rescue of self and others; new strokes and review; on-side and off-side maneuvers for going ahead, astern and abeam. Students may emphasize solo or tandem freestyle. ACA certification may be offered. A swimming test must be passed at the first course session to continue in the course. Course usually meets on two weekends.

HP 213 Sea Kayaking

1 cr.

Students learn sea (coastal) kayaking equipment handling; strokes, maneuvers and other techniques; rescue of self and others; trip planning and navigation; weather and environmental hazards and safety. ACA or BCU certification may be offered. Students provide their own equipment or may rent through the instructor. A swimming test must be passed at the first course session to continue in the course. Course meets on weekends.

HP 216 Skating-Beginning

1 cr.

Students learn basic skills and techniques of skating.

HP 216A Skating-Figure

1 cr.

Students learn basic skills and techniques of figure skating.

HP 216B Skating-Intermediate Figure

1 cr.

Designed for the figure skater who already has basic skills.

HP 217 Fly and Bait Casting

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of fly and bait casting.

HP 218 Folk Dance

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of folk dance.

HP 219 Golf-Beginning

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of golf.

HP 222 Hiking

1 cr.

Students learn about hiking in the wilderness and planning hiking trips.

HP 223 Individually Prescribed Program

1 cr.

Individually designed activity for someone who is physically unable to participate in any other HP activity.

HP 224 Jogging

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of jogging.

HP 226 Modern Dance-Beginning

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of modern dance.

HP 226A Modern Dance-Intermediate

1 cr.

Designed for the student who already has basic modern dance skills.

HP  226C Aerobics

1 cr.

Students learn and participate in various forms of aerobic exercise, including step aerobics.

HP 227 Orienteering

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of running in wooded terrain utilizing maps and compasses.

HP 228 Power Skating and Hockey

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of power skating and hockey.

HP 229 Racquetball

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of racquetball.

HP 230 Rock Climbing

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of rock climbing.

HP 230A Rock Climbing-Intermediate

1 cr.

Designed for the climber who already has basic skills.

HP 231 Skiing-Beginning

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of downhill skiing. Lab fee required. Students may rent equipment if needed.

HP 231A Skiing-Intermediate

1 cr.

Designed for the skier who already has basic skills. Lab fee required. Students may rent equipment if needed.

HP 231B Skiing-Cross Country

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of cross country skiing. Lab fee required. Students may rent equipment if needed.

HP 232 Snowboarding-Beginning

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of snowboarding.

HP 233 Snowshoeing

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of snowshoeing.

HP 234 Soccer

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of soccer.

HP 235 Social and Country Dancing

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of social and square dancing.

HP 236 Softball

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of softball.

HP 238 Winter Camping

1 cr.

An introduction to winter camping. Major topics include: clothing, equipment, food and outdoor cooking, trip planning, shelters, health and safety, basic principles of outdoor living, and winter travel techniques. Two weekend trips are required.

HP 239 Swimming-Beginning

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of swimming.

HP 239A Swimming-Intermediate

1 cr.

Designed for the swimmer who already has basic skills.

HP 239B Swimming-Lifeguard Training

1 cr.

American Red Cross training for lifeguard certification.

HP 239C Swimming-WSI

1 cr.

American Red Cross training for certification as a swimming instructor.

HP 239D Swimming-SCUBA

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of SCUBA.

HP 239E Swimming-Advanced SCUBA

2 cr.

Prerequisite: HP 239D or instructor permission.

Designed for the diver who already has basic skills.

HP 241 Tennis-Beginning

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of tennis.

HP 241A Tennis-Intermediate

1 cr.

Designed for the tennis player who already has basic skills.

HP 244 Volleyball-Beginning

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of volleyball.

HP 244A Volleyball-Intermediate

1 cr.

Designed for the volleyball player who already has basic skills.

HP 245 Weight Training and Conditioning

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of weight training and conditioning.

HP 245A Weight Training and Conditioning-Intermediate

1 cr.

Designed for the student who already has basic weight-training skills.

HP 246 Karate

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of karate.

HP 247 Yoga-Beginning

1 cr.

Students learn skills and techniques of yoga.

HP 249 Hunter Safety Education

1 cr.

Students learn basics of hunting safety and receive a Michigan Hunter Safety certificate.

HP 250 Physical Fitness

1 cr.

Prerequisite: A major in management of health and fitness, physical education, sports science, or outdoor recreation leadership and management. This course is a substitution for HP 200.

HP 253 Adventure Based Learning

1 cr.

Involves active participation and experiential learning in a variety of adventure-based activities (games, initiatives, climbing wall, ropes course) with an emphasis on the development, application, and transfer of individual and group skills.

HP 259 Tai-Chi

1 cr.

Students will learn the techniques of Tai Chi Chuan, a soft style Chinese martial art that involves low impact exercises.

HP 260 Rape Aggression Defense Systems

1 cr.

The Rape Aggression Defense approach to personal safety education embodies a practical blend of threat avoidance strategies and real-world assault resistance tactics for women.

HR

(Technology and Occupational Sciences Department)

HR 001 Theory of Cosmetology I

8 cr.

Corequisite: HR 020.

Textbook study covering 120 theory hours of twelve cosmetology curriculum subjects as prescribed by the Michigan State Board of Cosmetology and listed in the Cosmetology Laws and Rules Book.

HR 002 Theory of Cosmetology II

8 cr.

Prerequisite: HR 001.

Corequisite: HR 021.

The intermediate level of 120 theory hours in an in-depth study of the complete cosmetology curriculum, covering all subjects prescribed by the Michigan State Board of Cosmetology.

HR 003 Theory of Cosmetology III

8 cr.

Prerequisite: HR 002.

Corequisite: HR 022.

Final phase of 120 theory hours, stressing preparation for the state examination and including a mock test. The actual State Board of Cosmetology examination for licensing as a cosmetologist is given at the conclusion of the course.

HR 020 Practice of Cosmetology I

9 cr.

Corequisite: HR 001.

The first phase of 405 hours of practical training, covering 218 assignments performed upon mannequins or classmates.

HR 021 Practice of Cosmetology II

9 cr.

Prerequisite: HR 020.

Corequisite: HR 002.

The intermediate level of 405 hours of practical work involving the public patron clinic. Students are assigned a work service station and serve public patrons under the supervision of an instructor. A minimum of 322 practical assignments is required.

HR 022 Practice of Cosmetology III

9 cr.

Prerequisite: HR 021.

Corequisite: HR 003.

The advanced level of 405 hours of cosmetology practice, refining skills previously learned and practiced in the patron clinic and introducing advanced techniques in preparing students for the salon.

HR 030 Science of Cosmetology I

1 cr.

Development of proper personal appearance, attitude, cooperativeness, good work habits, abilities, and performance. Attendance and dependability are also stressed to prepare the student for the world of work. Skills development is based upon systematized training.

HR 031 Science of Cosmetology II

1 cr.

Prerequisite: HR 030.

Further development of skills in cosmetology based upon systematized training in attitudes, work habits, personal appearance, personality development, attendance and dependability, and the ability to work comfortably with public patrons.

HR 032 Science of Cosmetology III

1 cr.

Prerequisites: HR 031.

The final phase of refinement of personal appearance and personality to cope with the cosmetologist’s business world.

Instruction in the application of false nails and build-a-nail techniques as well as ornamental use of glitter and jewels. Consists of 5 hours of theory and 40 hours of practical applications.

HR 055 Theory of Health Safety and Law

4 cr.

The theory of sanitation and safety in the practice of the art of manicuring. Reference is made to Michigan laws and rules which were promulgated for the safe practice of this occupation and to prevent the spread of infectious/contagious disease. Curriculum meets criteria set by the State of Michigan for successfully passing the written and practical state test for licensure.

HR 056 Theory of Manicuring

4 cr.

The discussion of the body and underlying structures affected by the manicuring techniques, the massage, application techniques, chemistry and special artistic effects needed to perform the tasks of a manicurist. In addition, techniques for building a client base and successful practice are discussed. Curriculum meets State of Michigan standards for application for licensure.

HR 057 Practical Application

4 cr.

The practical application and practice of sanitary, safety and application of all tasks related to manicuring. Procedures meet Michigan standards for licensure.

HR 060 Theory of Cosmetology Fundamentals

4 cr.

An orientation and review of all cosmetology curriculum. The curriculum discussed is set by the State of Michigan. The related knowledge is necessary for successful completion of the state test for licensure.

HR 061 Theory of Cosmetology Supervision

4 cr.

Applications and awareness are discussed regarding the monitoring of students practicing cosmetology application on the general public and mannequins. In addition, strategies for presenting practical and theoretically related to the practice of cosmetology are also discussed. The procedures presented meet State of Michigan standards for licensure.

HR 062 Theory of Cosmetology Administration

2 cr.

An awareness of the laws and rules required by the State of Michigan for cosmetology school administration and record keeping are discussed.

HR 063 Practice of Cosmetology Fundamentals

4 cr.

Assisting students in developing competencies in all practical and theory related areas set by the State of Michigan curriculum.

HR 064 Practice of Cosmetology Supervision

4 cr.

Monitoring student activities in all classroom and lab situations for the safe and sanitary practice of cosmetology activities. In addition, attention to compliance with State law is observed.

HS

(History Department)

HS 101 History of Western Civilization to 1600

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Development of culture from the earliest times to 1600. Emphasis is distributed equally among the Ancient, Medieval, and Renaissance worlds.

HS 102 History of Western Civilization Since 1600

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Development of culture from 1600 to the present day. Cultural, social, economic, and political ideas and institutions are traced as background to the understanding of contemporary problems.

HS 104 The Third World in Historical Perspective

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of social sciences requirement.

Satisfies the world cultures requirement.

Survey of Asia, Africa, and Latin America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including the colonial pattern, the anti-colonial movements for national independence, the reassessment of tradition, the strategies for development, the understanding of human rights.

HS 126 The United States to 1865

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of social sciences requirement.

Survey of early American history from the colonial period through the Civil War. Emphasis on political developments within a broad economic, social, and cultural context.

HS 127 The United States Since 1865

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of social sciences requirement.

Survey of recent American history from Reconstruction to the present. Political, economic, social, cultural, educational, and diplomatic facets of the American experience are emphasized.

HS 200 Historical Thinking and Writing

4 cr.

Prerequisites: EN 111 with grade of “C” or better.

The study of the past as a way of thinking and writing about evidence, interpretation, and explanation. Explores difficulties inherent in examining the human past and asks basic questions about historical study as both a social science and an art.

HS 233 Native American History

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of social sciences requirement.

Satisfies the world cultures requirement.

Study from origins to the present. Central theme is the persistence of Native American ethnic identity in the face of white conquest and efforts at elimination or assimilation.

HS 234 Indigenous People of Latin America

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Satisfies the world cultures requirement.

A study of the Indians of Latin America which traces their general development from the pre-Columbian era to the contemporary period. The national Indian policies of the 19th and 20th centuries will be stressed.

HS 244 The American Labor Movement

2 cr.

This course provides an historical perspective on the history of the American worker's response to the Industrial Revolution, the origins and development of the union movement, and an analysis of the current problems facing the American worker and the union movement today.

HS 245 The American West

4 cr.

Development and settlement of the trans-Mississippi west from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Myths and realities are contrasted in order to understand and appreciate the role of the West in the past and present and its influence on the American character.

HS 251 Latin American Civilization

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Satisfies the world cultures requirement.

Introduction to the development of culture, society, and values through a study of pertinent topics from the colonial origins to the present.

HS 252 Arab-Islamic History

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Satisfies the world cultures requirement.

Introduction to the political, social, economic, intellectual, and artistic history of the Arabic-speaking peoples from the seventh century to the present. The religious history of Islam and the Islamic way of life is intrinsic to the whole course.

HS 254 Introduction to the History of Africa

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Satisfies the world cultures requirement.

Survey of the history of the continent south of the Sahara Desert. Consideration of pre-colonial African peoples, cultures, and ecology. Emphasis on nineteenth-century imperial rivalries, the rise of nationalism, and the creation of present day independent states.

HS 256 Approaching China

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Satisfies the world cultures requirement.

Historical introduction to the distinctive cultural integration of pre-revolutionary China, approached comparatively as an original style of thinking, feeling, and organizing life.

HS 258 The Emergence of Modern Japan

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Satisfies the world cultures requirement.

The main emphasis is on a study of the changes in Japanese ideas and institutions since the country was forced open by the West in 1853 to the present day. In order to set the stage there is a brief overview of ancient and medieval Japan, with somewhat more attention given to the Tokugawa Period (1603-1868).

HS 283 The American Woman

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

The story of American women. Emphasis on the accomplishments and contributions of women in history, on understanding the historical relationship between women and men, and on the individual perception associated with these relationships.

HS 293 Minorities in American History

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Examination of the origin, development, and significance of selected minority groups. Emphasis on women, African Americans, Chicanos, Japanese, and Native Americans as well as on such problems as cultural identity, racism, and sexism.

HS 295 Special Topics in History

1-4 cr.

May be repeated for credit if topic differs.

Investigation of a significant topic or problem in history. Content varies depending upon the intention of the instructor and the needs of the students.

HS 300 Ancient Egypt

4 cr.

Survey of culture in the Age of the Pharaohs (3100 B.C. to 300 B.C.) and into the Ptolemaic, Roman, and Christian eras, with an epilogue on Muslim Egypt from the conquest to the present.

HS 302 Ancient Rome

4 cr.

Rome from the earliest times, the republic, the conquest of the Mediterranean world, the Roman revolution, Caesar and Augustus, the Pax Romana, and the later empire. Cultural, political, and social institutions are reviewed.

HS 304 The Middle Ages

4 cr.

Europe from the fall of the Roman Empire (300 A.D.) to the beginning of modern civilization with the Renaissance (1400 A.D.). Topics include the barbarian invasions, Carolingian times, feudalism, the growth of the Catholic Church, the Crusades, philosophy, and the arts.

HS 305 Renaissance-Reformation

4 cr.

Europe from 1300 to 1600: the transition from the medieval to the modern world. The development of the modern state, society, and economy; the age of humanism, Renaissance art, exploration, and science; the protestant, catholic, and counter reformations.

HS 307 Early Modern Europe, 1600-1815: A Thematic Approach

4 cr.

The course provides in-depth study both in terms of content and historiography of some of the main themes of early modern European history. Topics include overseas expansion; reform of religion; the royal state; the intellectual revolution; society and economy in the pre-industrial age; and the French Revolution. The number of topics and the approach will vary according to instructor.

HS 308 Modern Europe, 1815-Present: A Thematic Approach

4 cr.

The course provides in-depth study both in terms of content and historiography of some of the main themes of modern European history, 1815 to the present. Topics may include industrialization and its consequences; the creation of the modern nation state; the new imperialism; the road to war; the age of total war; and post-war world; and epilogue. The number of topics and the approach will vary according to the instructor.

HS 312 Revolutionary Russia

4 cr.

Study of autocracy, nationality, and orthodoxy in imperial Russia and the reformist movements culminating in the Revolutions of 1917; the theory and practice of communism from 1917 to the present.

HS 314 Modern Britain, 1485-Present

4 cr.

A survey of the history of Great Britain and Ireland from the accession of the Tudor dynasty in 1485 to present times. Attention is given to political development and reform, economic life, empire, foreign relations, and changes in society and culture.

HS 315 Imperialism

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Prerequisite: Completion of the foundations of communication requirement and sophomore standing.

The course investigates the development of modern imperialism from the eighteenth century to the present, from the rise of European economic interests in Asia and Africa to the process of decolonization in the twentieth century. It examines the responses of both colonizers and colonized to the forces of imperialism, with emphasis placed upon primary readings in history, politics, and literature.

HS 316 The Holocaust

4 cr.

The course concerns the mass murder of approximately six million Jews by the Nazi regime and its allies from 1939-1945. Students will investigate the way in which the German government attempted to impose “the final solution,” as well as its causes and consequences with reference both to its victims and perpetrators. The course employs literature and psychology as well as historical works in its discussion of the “Shoah.”

HS 325 Colonial American History

4 cr.

This course looks at such topics as European expansion and colonization in the New World and the social, political, and economic foundations of American society.

HS 326 The American Revolution and the Constitution

4 cr.

Begins with the origins of the War of Independence; traces the war and its leaders, and then follows the nation through the Confederation. The development and implementation of the Constitution of 1787 and the Bill of Rights is then discussed.

HS 327 Civil War and Reconstruction

4 cr.

A study of the social, political, economic, and military developments starting with the causes and the background of the Civil War, carrying on through the war itself and the Reconstruction after the war. The impact of the Civil War on the development of major issues in United States history since the war, such as racism, constitutionalism, and economics also will be considered.

HS 328 Turbulent Decades, 1930-1950

4 cr.

This course will focus on two major events that changed American life: The Depression and World War II. Emphasis will be on economics, political, and social developments.

HS 335 Michigan History

4 cr.

Survey of state developments from the coming of the European to the present. Emphasis on its regional and national context.

HS 336 History of the Upper Peninsula

4 cr.

Survey of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula from its Indian origins to the present.

HS 337 American Economic History

4 cr.

Cross-listed with EC 337.

Satisfies the foundations of social sciences requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Prerequisites: Completion of the foundations of communication requirement and sophomore standing.

Transformation of the American economy, with particular emphasis on the modern period of industrialization. Special attention will be devoted to the role of the corporation, ethics, advertising, environment, labor, public-policy decisions, critics, and defenders of the economic order.

HS 340 American Foreign Policy to 1900

4 cr.

Key episodes of American diplomacy from 1776 to 1900. Both policy formulation and implementation are emphasized via critical analysis.

HS 341 American Foreign Policy Since 1900

4 cr.

Examination of the salient aspects of American diplomacy in the twentieth century and America’s role in the world as it becomes a world power.

HS 350 Methods and Materials in Teaching Social Studies Education

4 cr.

May not be applied toward a non-teaching major or any minor in history.

Prerequisite: Admission to the methods phase of teacher education.

Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ED 349.

Teaching of the social studies at the secondary level. The objectives, the organization of subject matter, the evaluation and use of materials, and the development of classroom procedures and techniques.

HS 352 African American History

4 cr.

An overview of African American history in the United States with particular emphasis on such topics as the slave experience, the civil rights movement, and significant contributions to the nation’s history.

HS 353 The Finnish Immigrant in America

4 cr.

Focus on the inner meaning of immigration for Finnish Americans and on the institutional pattern they created in the new environment of America, particularly the Upper Peninsula. Written project consisting of a social history of a Finnish-American family spanning three generations is required.

HS 360 Chinese Revolution, 1800-Present

4 cr.

The transformation of life patterns in China induced by the collision between China and the West. Emphasizes the causes and implications of this collision for China and ourselves.

HS 361 History of the Americas

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Prerequisite: Completion of the foundations of communication requirement and sophomore standing.

A comparative and thematic history of the people and history of the Western Hemisphere. The topical approach will concentrate on the comparison and contrast of concepts and ideas throughout the hemisphere from the prehistoric Native American cultures to the contemporary scene.

HS 362 History of Mexico

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Satisfies the world cultures requirement.

Prerequisite: Completion of the foundations of communication requirement and sophomore standing.

A history of the Mexican people from their prehistoric origins, through the colonial development, independence, the rise of national Mexico, and the era of Diaz. Special attention will be paid to the Mexican Revolution (1910) and the development of modern Mexico.

HS 363 Canadian History and Culture

4 cr.

Survey of geography, history, and culture from the arrival of the white man to the present, with considerable emphasis on contemporary Canada.

HS 372 American Urban History

4 cr.

Survey of the history of the American city. Topics will include the development of cities, immigration and migration to cities, the relationship of urban and rural areas, and the reasons for the growth and/ or decay of cities.

HS 373 History and Life History

4 cr.

Satisfies the foundations of humanities requirement.

Satisfies the upper division liberal studies requirement.

Prerequisites: Completion of the foundations of communication requirement and sophomore standing.

Interdisciplinary study of the intersection of history and psychology. Topics drawn from nineteenth and twentieth-century world history; readings include autobiographies as well as theoretical studies.

HS 380 Public History

4 cr.

This course provides a background in public history which deals with historical administration, grantship and fund-raising, editing, preservation, management, and use of historical resources in historical societies, museums, galleries, and governmental agencies and private consulting firms.

HS 382 Historical Role Playing

2 cr.

May be repeated for credit if the site differs.

Prerequisites: HS 126 and HS 127 highly recommended.

Required for Michigan Bureau of History living history role players.

Study of role playing in America with special concentration on a specific site such as Fort Wilkins State Park, Fayette State Park, or other parks.  Students study the philosophy of role playing, the role of park interpretation, and the social history of the period.

HS 444 Research in Labor History

2 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

An examination of case studies in American Labor History to ascertain the dimensions of the human struggle in achieving organizational goals concerning working conditions, compensation, and the labor market.

HS 481 Oral History

1 cr.

May be taken only once.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Study of the history, techniques, and application of interviewing individuals for historical purposes.

HS 490 Junior/Senior Seminar in History

4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Prerequisites: HS 200 and 12 additional credits in history. Junior standing or instructor permission.

Seminar dealing with an important historical problem or with important historians or texts as determined by the instructor. Major work will consist of researching and writing an article-length, student-critiqued historical essay.

HS 491 Internship in History

1-6  cr.

May be taken more than once for up to 6 credits with a maximum of 3 counting for the minor.

Prerequisites: HS 200, 2.5 GPA, junior standing and departmental permission.

Professional internship experience, such as in a museum, historical society, archives, or in historical preservation advocacy.

HS 495 Special Topics in History

1-4 cr.

May be repeated if topic differs.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Investigation of a significant topic or problem in history. Content varies depending upon the intentions of the instructor and the needs of the students.

HS 498 Directed Study in History

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and department permission.

Individual investigation of a significant topic or problem in the study, teaching, or writing of history.

HV

(Technology and Occupational Sciences Department)

HV 170 Applied Electricity for Trades

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Basic concepts of electricity as applied to heating, ventilation, air conditioning, refrigeration, construction, industrial maintenance and related trade areas.  Introduction to electrical circuit fundamentals, electrical safety, meters, basic circuit components and symbols, single and three phase power supply systems, wiring installation, circuit protection, motors, capacitors, relays, and wiring diagrams.

HV 171 Basic Heating

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Prerequisites: HV 170 or concurrent enrollment.

An introduction to the principles and components used in heating systems. Pipe and tube fitting, theory of heat flow, sources of energy, combustion, electrical controllers, humidification, air filtering, venting, and code requirements.

HV 172 Basic Refrigeration

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Prerequisites: HV 170 or concurrent enrollment.

Introduction to the components necessary for mechanical refrigeration. Students become familiar with the functions, operations and relationship of the components. Emphasis is placed on designs, operations, and variations of component parts and control systems.

HV 173 Heating Systems I

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Prerequisites: HV 170 and HV 171 or instructor permission.

Gas heating systems, gas piping design and installation, mid-and high-efficiency gas heating equipment, basic and advanced gas heating controls, integrated microprocessor controls, venting, installation, troubleshooting, service and code requirements.

HV 174 ACR Systems I

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Prerequisites: HV 172 or instructor permission.

This course is a continuation of the study of mechanical air conditioning systems. It will include sequence of operation, electrical systems, psychometrics and specialized tools and techniques used to service these types of equipment. Specific emphasis will be on principles of operation and applications of heat pumps, and ventilation equipment including residential and commercial equipment.

HV 175 Air Delivery Systems

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Study of psychrometrics (the properties of air), air flow principles and duct system configurations and fabrication. Emphasis will be placed on testing (measuring), adjusting and balancing air delivery systems.

HV 270 Heating Systems II

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Prerequisites: HV 170 and HV 171 or instructor permission.

Oil heating systems, hydronic (hot water) controls and circuits, hydronic heating system components and design, zoned systems, system control strategies, installation, troubleshooting, service and code requirement.

HV 271 ACR Systems II

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Prerequisites: HV 172 or instructor permission.

This is an advanced mechanical refrigeration course that includes the study and application of total system operation with specific emphasis on: accessories, defrost systems, pressure controls, pressure regulating devices, multiple systems, commercial pipe sizing, motor starters and controllers.

HV 273 Comfort Systems Design

4 cr.

Prerequisites: HV 171 and HV 172, or concurrent enrollment in HV 172 and HV 173.

This course is designed to teach the basic principles and techniques needed to accurately calculate heating/cooling loads and size duct for a residential building. Standard industry methods used are based on Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) manuals “J” and “D”. The student is introduced to computer programs used for residential system design.

HV 275 HVACR Technical Problems

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Prerequisites: HV 173 and HV 174; HV 270 and HV 271 or concurrent enrollment.

Advanced laboratory experience in installation and service of air conditioning and refrigeration systems. Emphasis is placed on completion of specialized laboratory projects involving application, installation, and service of equipment.

IM

(Technology and Occupational Sciences Department)

IM 110 Tool Usage

2 cr. (1-0-2)

Proper use and care of industrial maintenance tools. These include pullers, bearing heaters, oxyacetylene torches, taps, dies, portable and stationary drill presses, metal brake, punch, shears, cutoff saws, grinders, hydraulic press, band saw, measuring tools, levels, and power hand tools.

IM 214 Alignment, Power Transmission and Conveyors

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Prerequisites: IM 110, and IT 215 or instructor's approval.

Principles of operation and applications of industrial conveyors, power transmission equipment and alignment. Component examples are couplings, sheaves, bushings, bearings, housings, belts, chains, sprockets, seals, variable speed drives, and gear reducers. Includes installation and maintenance.

IM 220 Pumps, Piping and Valves

4 cr. (2-0-4)

Prerequisites: IM 110 and IT 215 or instructor's approval.

Principles of design, operation and maintenance of pumps, industrial valves and piping systems used to move liquids and materials in industry.

IP

(Modern Languages and Literatures Department)

IP 285 Study Abroad: Special Topics

1-12 cr.

Courses taken abroad in the student's area of study. NMU credits determined by applicable departments.

IP 286 Study Abroad: Special Topics

1-12 cr.

Graded S/U.

Courses taken abroad in the student's area of study. NMU credits determined by applicable departments.

IP 485 Study Abroad: Special Topics

1-12 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Courses taken abroad in the student's area of study. NMU credits determined by applicable departments.

IP 486 Study Abroad: Special Topics

1-12 cr.

Graded S/U.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor permission.

Courses taken abroad in the student's area of study. NMU credits determined by applicable departments.

IP 490 International Studies Seminar

4 cr.

Prerequisites: Completion of study abroad experience and 75 credit hours, junior standing or instructor permission.

The objective of the course is to discuss and analyze the various experiences of traveling, studying and living in a foreign culture. Discussion focuses on the various stages of "culture-shock" and the adaptation process that a person experiences while abroad.

IP 498 Directed Study in International Studies

1-4 cr.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of advising department.

Individual research in international studies. Final report must be filed with the instructor.

IS

(College of Business–Information Systems)

CIS majors or minors must earn a minimum grade of C- in each CIS/IS course applying to their CIS major/minor.

CIS 110 is the equivalent of IS 100, IS 101, IS 102 and IS 104.

IS 100 Introduction to Windows, E-mail, and the Internet

1 cr.

Satisfies 1 credit hour of the formal communication studies requirement.

This course will introduce students to the use of Microsoft Windows operating system, e-mail, and the Internet.  Students must successfully complete this course or pass the waiver exam to enroll in any of the other IS software application courses.

IS 101 Beginning Word Processing

1 cr.

Satisfies 1 credit hour of the formal communication studies requirement.

Prerequisite: IS 100.

Students will develop basic skills in the operation of word processing software. Emphasis is on creating, formatting, and revising documents and tables, merging documents, and working with graphics.

IS 102 Beginning Spreadsheets

1 cr.

Satisfies 1 credit hour of the formal communication studies requirement.

Prerequisite: IS 100.

Students will develop basic skills in the operation of spreadsheet software.  Emphasis is on the principles of spreadsheet design and creating and formatting basic spreadsheets and charts.

IS 104 Beginning Database

1 cr.

Satisfies 1 credit hour of the formal communication studies requirement.

Prerequisite: IS 100.

Students will develop basic skill in the use of database software. Emphasis is on database terminology, manipulating database files, and creating queries.

IS 105 Presentation/Multimedia Software

1 cr.

Satisfies 1 credit hour of the formal communication studies requirement.

Prerequisite: IS 100.

Students will develop proficiency in the use of presentation and multimedia software.  Emphasis is on the principles of presentation design and development of multimedia presentations.  In addition, students will learn how to utilize projection devices for audience viewing.

IS 107 Beginning Desktop Publishing

1 cr.

Satisfies 1 credit hour of the formal communication studies requirement.

Prerequisite: IS 100.

This course will introduce students to desktop publishing, including the principles of page layout and design. The emphasis will be on the elements of design through hands-on applications.

IS 111 Computerized Personal Accounting

1 cr.

Satisfies 1 credit hour of the formal communication studies requirement.

Prerequisite: IS 100.

This course will provide students with an ability to use a computerized software program to manage their personal finances.

IS 112 Computerized Small Business Accounting

1 cr.

Satisfies 1 credit hour of the formal communication studies requirement.

Prerequisite: IS 100.

This course will provide students with basic "business literacy" by having them operate a business using a popular small business accounting software program. Students develop confidence in recording business transactions using an up-to-date commercial software program designed for small to mid-size businesses.

IS 120 Computer Concepts

2 cr.

Satisfies 1 credit hour of the formal communication studies requirement.

Prerequisite: IS 100.

Students will develop an understanding of basic computer concepts. Computer technology, hardware and software, security, and technology in organizations will be covered.  No hands-on computer applications are included.

IS 201 Advanced Word Processing

1 cr.

Satisfies 1 credit hour of the formal communication studies requirement.

Prerequisites: IS 100 and IS 101.

Students will develop advanced skills in the operation of word processing software. Emphasis is on working with large documents, arranging text and text objects, and creating and modifying charts and forms.

IS 202 Intermediate Spreadsheets

1 cr.

Satisfies 1 credit hour of the formal communication studies requirement.

Prerequisites: IS 100 and IS 102.

Students will expand their skills in the operation of spreadsheet software. Emphasis is on manipulating large spreadsheets, applying advanced formulas and functions to solve problems, and sorting and querying lists of data.

IS 203 Advanced Spreadsheets

1 cr.

Satisfies 1 credit hour of the formal communication studies requirement.

Prerequisites: IS 100, IS 102 and IS 202.

Students will develop advanced skill in applying spreadsheet software tools to work-related problems.  Emphasis is on working with macros, custom charts, data tables, and pivot tables.

IS 204 Advanced Database

1 cr.

Satisfies 1 credit hour of the formal communication studies requirement.

Prerequisites: IS 100 and IS 104.

Students will expand their skills in the use of database software.  Emphasis is on creating databases and creating and modifying reports.

IS 206 Software Integration

1 cr.

Satisfies 1 credit hour of the formal communication studies requirement.

Prerequisites: IS 100, IS 101, IS 102, IS 104 and IS 105.

Students will develop skills in integrating word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation graphics documents.  Emphasis will be on merging word processing and database files, linking and embedding work sheets and charts in word processing documents, and integrating word processing, spreadsheet, and database documents with presentation graphics documents.

IS 207 Intermediate Desktop Publishing

1 cr.

Satisfies 1 credit hour of the formal communication studies requirement.

Prerequisites: IS 100 and IS 107.

This course will provide students with more advanced application in desktop publishing, including design concepts, working with multiple pages, and advanced graphics.  The emphasis will be on the elements of design through hands-on applications.

IS 208 Web Page Development

1 cr.

Satisf